2019 Tennessee Nurses Association Book of Reports

emiller

NURSES

THE REAL

SUPER HEROES

2019 TNA & TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE

OCTOBER 18-20, 2019

Memphis Hilton

939 Ridge Lake Blvd.

Memphis, TN 38120

TENNESSEE STUDENT NURSES ASSOCIATION


2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

October 18-20. 2019

Memphis - Hilton — Memphis, TN

Table of Contents

Welcome from the TNA President ..................................................................3

Welcome from the TNA Executive Director ..........................................................5

Welcome from the Tennessee Student Nurses Association ............................................9

TNA Conference Schedule .........................................................................11

TSNA Conference Schedule .......................................................................17

Hilton-Memphis Floor Plan Meeting Rooms ..........................................................21

General Announcements .........................................................................23

Meet Our Keynote and Plenary Speakers ...........................................................24

Meet the Presenters .............................................................................26

Tennessee Nurses Political Action Committee (TNPAC) ..............................................29

2019 Membership Assembly Rules and Information .................................................33

111 th Membership Assembly Agenda ................................................................34

Disclosures to Participants, Continuing Nursing Education Instructions ................................35

Introduction to Robert’s Rules of Order ............................................................36

TNA Proposed Bylaws ...........................................................................40

2018-2020 Legislative and Health Policy Statements ................................................50

Nightingale Tribute & Memoriam ..................................................................55

TNA District Map ................................................................................57

TNA Board of Directors & Staff ...................................................................58

2019 Slate of Candidates .........................................................................59

Poster Abstracts ................................................................................68

TNA Financials ..................................................................................88

TNA Leadership Opportunities ....................................................................92

Area of Interest Form ............................................................................93

TNA Past Presidents .............................................................................94

Tennessee Nurses Foundation (TNF) Scholarships ..................................................95

TNF Board of Trust Roster ........................................................................96

TNA Member Benefits ...........................................................................97

TNA 2020 Events ...............................................................................101

Printed and Published for the Tennessee Nurses Association by:

Arthur L. Davis Publishing Agency

517 Washington, P.O. Box 216, Cedar Falls, IA 50613 • (319) 277-2414

www.tnaonline.org

Published by:

Arthur L. Davis

Publishing Agency, Inc.

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Welcome from the TNA President

Haley Vance, DNP, APRN, CPNP-AC

On Behalf of the Tennessee Nurses Association Board of Directors & Staff, I want to

welcome you to the 2019 Tennessee Nurses Association (TNA) & Tennessee Student

Nurses Association (TSNA) Joint Conference.

This year’s conference theme is “Nurses: The Real Super Heroes.” As a profession,

we have an incredible opportunity to advocate for, influence, and empower both

our nurse colleagues and the patients we provide care for. We want to celebrate this

and encourage nurses across the state to speak loudly with one unified voice. We

are excited to be in Memphis this year! Many long hours have gone into planning

conference to provide you with intentional and thoughtful time for open dialogue

regarding healthcare issues in Tennessee, excellent continuing education, poster

sessions, and networking opportunities.

We are thrilled to have several distinguished guests joining us this year. Rose Sherman, EdD, RN, NAE-BC,

FAAN is the editor of Nurse Leader journal. She will join us on Friday evening to share insight on building

leadership and trust throughout your nursing career. We will have a dynamic session Saturday on pain

management and opioids led by Theresa Mallick-Searle, MS, ANP-BC. Our keynote speaker on Saturday is

Ernest J. Grant, PhD, RN, FAAN, our newly elected 36 th president of the American Nurses Association. Dr.

Grant will share with us from a national perspective and inspire us to pursue avenues of leadership within

the nursing profession. Our closing speaker on Sunday is Lynn Pierce, BSN, RN, CPHRM who serves as a

risk consultant for CNA. Her expertise on healthcare risk management will provide practical information for

preventing malpractice in our day-to-day practices.

Forming relationships with key stakeholders and legislators is crucial to the success of TNA’s legislative

agenda. We look forward to hearing from local legislators regarding healthcare related issues and priorities

for the upcoming session. As an organization, we will also dive deep into our bylaws and seek to engage in

thoughtful discussion regarding the future direction of the association.

Thank you for making this weekend a priority. I look forward to meeting and interacting with you. Welcome

to conference!

Sincerely,

Haley Vance

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Welcome from the Executive Director

Tina Gerardi, MS, RN, CAE

Welcome to the 2019 Tennessee Nurses Association (TNA) & Tennessee Student Nurses

Association Joint Conference. This year is the first year of our endeavor to move the

annual conference to different regions of the state. We are so happy to be in West

Tennessee and look forward to alternating our future conference sites. I am confident

that we will learn together, exchange ideas, chart the course for nursing for the

upcoming year, share our wisdom with our colleagues and with the profession’s future,

our students. I think we will also have some fun along the way!

This year’s theme, Nurses: The Real Super Heroes, recognizes the extraordinary work

registered nurses do every day whether at the bedside, in the classroom, in the board

room, or in the Capitol. Each day as we promote public trust for the nursing profession,

we consistently provide quality patient care, quality nursing practice, quality nursing education, quality

nursing research, quality nursing leadership, and quality health for all Tennesseans. Our opening plenary

speaker Rose Sherman will share key attributes needed to be an effective leader and the role of trust and

psychological safety in leadership today. Ernest Grant, ANA President and our keynote speaker, will articulate

his vision for his presidency as well as ANA’s current priorities and initiatives. Our closing plenary speaker,

Lynn Pierce will highlight ways to avoid malpractice while assuring safe nursing practice in our daily work. In

addition to our concurrent sessions, we will be introducing the use of general sessions this year - one on the

topic of opioids and one on the topic of when medical errors become criminal charges.

We have a very busy 2 1 /2 days together! The Membership Assembly will convene to do the work of the

Association – reviewing bylaws proposals and setting direction and priorities for the upcoming year. TNA will

elect new members of the board of directors, support the work of the Tennessee Nurses Foundation and the

Tennessee Nurses Political Action Committee, and confer awards on outstanding nurses from across the state.

I look forward to meeting you and working together to make TNA the unifying voice for nursing in Tennessee.

2019 Conference Planning Committee

This year’s conference has been diligently planned under the direction of Nancy Stevens

(TNA Board Director of Education) and our 2019 Conference Planning Committee.

Please thank the following individuals for their yearlong effort in planning our annual conference:

Sheila Bouie

Diane Cunningham

Kathryn Denton

Hugh Friar

Tina Gerardi

Sharon Hinton

Teresa Johnson

Tina McElravey

Jordan Miller

Kathleen Murphy

Laura Reed

Alyssa Soto

Nancy Stevens

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Welcome from the TSNA President

Alyssa Soto, RN, BSN

Welcome to the 2019 TNA and TSNA Joint Conference. I want to personally thank

each and every one of you for attending this conference and being passionate about

the advancement in nursing. As nursing students, we have a unique opportunity to

speak change and foster growth in the educational field prior to embarking on our

journey as a registered nurse. TSNA provides us with this platform to gather our

voices together, pass legislation, change school policy, or even state requirements, and

connect with other students across the state.

TSNA provides a platform for connecting students to make a change. As a member

of TSNA you are able to meet students from across the state and sometimes, across

the nation. In being here today, you have chosen to grow and make a difference in the

nursing field. I want to thank you for making this choice.

Over the next two days, you will have the opportunity to hear from experts throughout the nursing field, ask

questions to those who may already be working in the field you desire, meet other students embarking on

the same journey, take part in an NCLEX review, and talk with vendors from across the state. Stop by the

TSNA registration table for more information and to see what event is next on the agenda!

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Tennessee Nurses Association

Conference Schedule*

*Schedule subject to change without notice

Friday, October 18 Activity/Event Location Contact Hours

8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. TNA Registration Open TN Grand Ballroom Foyer

10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. TNF & TN Nurse PAC Silent Auction

Open

10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Membership Assembly

Candidates Forum

Southeast Ballroom A

TN Grand Ballroom A

11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Concurrent Session A

“A Haven and a Nest” Caregivers’

Early Experience at the Nurse-Led

Dementia Medical Home - Mariya

Kovaleva, Vanderbilt University

Concurrent Session B

Does Premature Birth Contribute

to the Increase in Chronic Kidney

Disease? - Bobby Bellflower, UTHSC

Concurrent Session C

The Macroeconomic Benefits of

TN APRNs Having Full Practice

Authority - Tracy Stansberry, Cyril

Chang, David Mirvis, Carole Myers

TN Grand Ballroom A

TN Grand Ballroom D

TN Grand Ballroom E

1.0 Contact

Hour

1.0 Contact

Hour

1.0 Contact

Hour

12:15 p.m. – 12:45 p.m. Lunch TN Grand Ballroom A

12:15 p.m. – 12:45 p.m. TN Nurse PAC Membership Meeting TN Grand Ballroom E

1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Opening Session

Building Leadership and Trust

Throughout Your Career

Rose O. Sherman, EdD, RN, NEA-BC,

FAAN Editor of the Nurse Leader

journal; Graduate Coordinator for

the Nursing Administration Master’s

Program

Florida Atlantic University

TN Grand Ballroom A

1.0 Contact

Hour

2:15 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Issues Forum

Bylaws Forum

Break

Legislative Forum – Nurse Practice Act

6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Welcome Reception with Music &

Exhibits

Students are welcome to attend any activity

Green indicates business meeting

Blue font indicates TNA CE activity

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TN Grand Ballroom A

TN Grand Ballroom BC

3.0 Contact

Hours


2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Saturday, October 19 Activity/Event Location Contact Hours

7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Registration Open TN Grand Ballroom Foyer

7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. Poster Set-Up TN Grand Ballroom D

7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Sunrise Snack Foyer

7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. TNF and TN Nurse PAC Silent

Auction Open

Southeast Ballroom A

8:30 a.m. - 10:15 a.m. Membership Assembly TN Grand Ballroom A

10:15 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Break Foyer

10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Concurrent Session D

Poster Presentations

Presenters will be available to

answer questions or discuss poster

content

Concurrent Session E

Suicide Risk and Prevention Among

Nurses - Leslie Hopkins, Vanderbilt

University

TN Grand Ballroom D

TN Grand Ballroom A

1.0 Contact

Hour

1.0 Contact

Hour

Concurrent Session F

A Dualistic Potential for Danger—

When Nurse and Person with

Substance Use Disorder Vulnerability

Collide - Kendrea Todt, ETSU

TN Grand Ballroom E

11:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Transition to Lunch TN Grand Ballroom BC

11:45 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Exhibits & Schools of Nursing

Luncheon

2:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. General Session

Pain Management and Opioids:

Balancing the Risks and Benefits

Tracey Mallick-Searle, MS, ANP-BC

4:15 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Break

Visit Posters for Self Study CE

TN Grand Ballroom A

TN Grand Ballroom D

4:30 p.m. Silent Auction Closes Southeast Ballroom A

4:30 p.m. – 5:15 p.m. Membership Assembly

TN Nurse PAC Live Auction

5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Keynote Session

Ernest Grant, PhD, RN, FAAN

President, American Nurses

Association

TN Grand Ballroom A

TN Grand Ballroom A

6:45 p.m. – 7:15 p.m. TNA Achievement Awards TN Grand Ballroom A

7:15 p.m. – 8:45 p.m. TNA Awards Reception TN Grand Ballroom BC

7:15 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. TNF & TN Nurse PAC Silent Auction

Payment & Pick up

8:30 p.m. – 9:15 p.m. TN Nurse PAC Fundraiser

(Ticketed Event)

Students are welcome to attend any activity

Green indicates business meeting

Blue font indicates TNA CE activity

Southeast Ballroom A

TBD

1.0 Contact

Hour

2.0 Contact

Hours

1.0 Contact

Hour

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Sunday, October 20 Activity/Event Location Contact Hours

7:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m. Visit Posters for Self-Study CE TN Grand Ballroom D

7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Sunrise Snack Foyer

7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. TNA Registration Open TN Grand Ballroom Foyer

7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Voting for TNA Elections Southeast Ballroom A

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. General Session

When Medical Errors become

Criminal Charges - Presenting

attorneys to be announced

10:00 a.m. – 10:15 a.m. Break Foyer

Breakdown and Remove Posters

10:15 a.m. – 11:15 a.m. Closing Plenary Session

Stay a Real Superhero: Don’t

Become a Malpractice Case Study

Lynn Pierce, BSN, RN, CPHRM

Nurses Service Organization

TN Grand Ballroom A

TN Grand Ballroom D

TN Grand Ballroom A

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Membership Assembly/Adjournment TN Grand Ballroom A

Students are welcome to attend any activity

Green indicates business meeting

Blue font indicates TNA CE activity

1.0 Contact

Hour

1.0 Contact

Hour

The Tennessee Nurses Association is approved as a provider of nursing continuing professional

development by the South Carolina Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses

Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

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Nurses

Building a Culture of Health Across Tennessee

• Do you have a passion to make a difference in a population you care deeply about?

• Are you curious about how to create a Culture of Health where you live, learn,

work, play or worship?

• Have you thought about serving on a board or other body but don’t know where to start?

• Do you want to develop your leadership and advocacy skills for board or other work?

Come learn, work and lead with us as we

build a Culture of Health!

The Tennessee Action Coalition works with other

state action coalitions across the country to carry out

recommendations from the IOM Future of Nursing report.

For more information, check out the

Future of Nursing Campaign for Action website:

campaignforaction.org/about/


2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Tennessee Student Nurses Association

Conference Schedule*

*Schedule subject to change without notice

Friday, October 18 Activity/Event Location Contact Hours

10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. TNF & TN Nurse PAC Silent

Auction

Southeast Ballroom A

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. TSNA Board of Directors Meeting Southeast Ballroom BC

12:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. TSNA Registration Open Southeast Ballroom Foyer

1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. TNA Opening Session

Building Leadership and Trust

Throughout Your Career - Rose O.

Sherman, EdD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN

Editor of the Nurse Leader journal;

Graduate Coordinator for the

Nursing Administration Master’s

Program Florida Atlantic University

TN Grand Ballroom A

1.0 Contact

Hour

4:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. TSNA Open Session Southeast Ballroom BC

5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. TSNA House of Delegates I

Mandatory for Delegates, Open

Session

6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Welcome Reception with Music &

Exhibits

Southeast Ballroom BC

TN Grand Ballroom BC

Saturday, October 19 Activity/Event Location Contact Hours

7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. Poster Set-Up TN Grand Ballroom D

7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Sunrise Snack Foyer

7:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. TSNA Registration Open Southeast Ballroom Foyer

7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. TNF & TN Nurse PAC Silent

Auction

8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. TSNA House of Delegates II

Mandatory for Delegates, Open

Session

Southeast Ballroom A

Southeast Ballroom BC

9:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. TSNA Candidate Presentations Southeast Ballroom BC

9:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. TSNA Picmonic Southeast Ballroom BC

10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Poster Presentations

Presenters will be available to

answer questions or discuss poster

content

TN Grand Ballroom D

10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. TSNA Breakout Groups Southeast Ballroom BC

Blue font indicates TNA and TSNA activity/event.

1.0 Contact

Hour

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

11:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. TSNA Election Overview

Mandatory for Delegates &

Candidates

11:45 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Exhibits & Schools of Nursing

Luncheon

Southeast Ballroom BC

TN Grand Ballroom BC

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. TSNA NCLEX Review Southeast Ballroom BC

3:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. TSNA Nursing Specialty Panel Southeast Ballroom BC

4:15 p.m. – 5:15 p.m. TSNA Closing Session

Mandatory for Delegates &

Candidates

Southeast Ballroom BC

4:30p.m. Silent Auction Closes Southeast Ballroom A

5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Keynote Session

Ernest Grant, PhD, RN, FAAN

President, American Nurses

Association

TN Grand Ballroom A

1.0 Contact

Hour

6:45 p.m. – 8:15 p.m. TSNA Board of Director Meeting

2019-2020 New Board Members

Required to Attend

7:15 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. TNF & TN Nurse PAC Silent

Auction Payment & Pick Up

Southeast Ballroom BC

Southeast Ballroom A

Sunday, October 20 Activity/Event Location Contact Hours

7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Sunrise Snack Foyer

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. General Session

When Medical Errors become

Criminal Charges - Presenting

attorneys to be announced

10:00 a.m. – 10:15 a.m. Break Foyer

Breakdown and Remove Posters

10:15 a.m. – 11:15 a.m. Closing Plenary Session

Stay a Real Superhero: Don’t

Become a Malpractice Case Study

Lynn Pierce, BSN, RN, CPHRM

Nurses Service Organization

TN Grand Ballroom A

TN Grand Ballroom D

TN Grand Ballroom A

1.0 Contact

Hour

1.0 Contact

Hour

Blue font indicates TNA and TSNA activity/event.

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Hilton-Memphis Meeting Rooms

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

General Announcements

Welcome to the 2019 TNA & TSNA Joint Conference. Please follow the conference schedule, and download

the conference app, so you don’t miss any of our planned activities, events, educational sessions, or

Membership Assembly meetings. Please greet and make welcome the new members and first-time

attendees to our conference. New members have lavender ribbons, and First Timers have turquoise ribbons.

Donations for the Tennessee Nurses Foundation Silent Auction can be accepted up until 11 a.m. on Saturday.

Donations can be dropped off in the Southeast Ballroom A room.

There is no assigned seating for any general sessions, plenary speakers, or the keynote held in Tennessee

Grand Ballroom A, but please sit near the front of the room to make our speakers feel welcome. However,

during the Membership Assembly business sessions it is important that you sit in the designated area for

TNA members and non-members. This is necessary for voting on any issues brought forward during the

business meeting.

Not a TNA member? Join TNA now and receive $29 off your Full membership annual dues. Don’t miss out

on this opportunity to become part of the Voice for all nurses in Tennessee.

To receive the 1.0 contact hour for attending the poster presentations, you must visit ten posters. Poster

presenters will be present during Concurrent Session D on Saturday morning to answer questions or discuss

poster content. You will be able to do poster self-study during other times throughout Saturday and Sunday

morning.

Registration Hours

Friday: 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Saturday: 7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Sunday: 7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

VOTE on Sunday

Vote Sunday morning between 7:30 – 9:00 a.m. in

Southeast Ballroom A . Election results will be announced

during the closing Membership Assembly session beginning

at 11:30 a.m.

HILTON MEMPHIS WELCOMES

Tennessee Nurses Association!

We Appreciate Your Business!

A Community Built on Care

Seeking Experienced & New Grad RNs to join our team!

Advance Your Nursing Career with a Master of

Public Health or Graduate Certificate

100% Online or On Campus

MPH Concentrations:

• Biostatistics

• Community Health

• Epidemiology

• Health Services

Administration

Graduate Certificates:

• Biostatistics

• Epidemiology

• Gerontology

• Global Health

• Health Care Management

• Public Health

Contact: Jennifer Hunt,

MPH Coordinator and Academic Advisor

Email: mphcoordinator@etsu.edu

https://www.etsu.edu/cph/academics/graduate.php

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Meet the Keynote and Plenary Speakers

Opening Plenary Speaker

Friday, 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m

Rose O. Sherman, EdD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN

Rose O. Sherman is a Professor Emeritus in the Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing,

Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, Florida and currently serves as an adjunct

professor in the Marian K. Shaughnessy Leadership Academy at Case Western Reserve

University. She is nationally known for her work in the development of current and

future leaders and teaches the ANA new nurse manager program. Rose is an alumnus

of the Robert Wood Johnson Executive Nurse Fellowship Program and is a Fellow in

the American Academy of Nursing. She is author of a popular leadership blog www.

emergingrnleader.com designed for emerging nurse leaders, and is Editor in Chief

of AONE’s journal Nurse Leader. She received the 2018 AONE Nurse Researcher of

the Year Award. Her first book, The Nurse Leader Coach: Become the Boss No One Wants to Leave was

published in February 2019.

General Session

Saturday, 2:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.

Pain Management and Opioids: Balancing the Risks and Benefits

Tracey Mallick-Searle, MS, ANP-BC

Sponsored by the Nurse Practitioner Healthcare Foundation, this dynamic session

addresses the nature and pathophysiology of pain, assessing patients in pain, risks

and benefits of immediate release and extended release opioids, patient and family

counseling on safe use and disposal, complications associated with misuse and

diversion, as well as recognizing opioid use disorder (addiction).

This program meets most states’ requirements for opioid education and is fully

compliant with the Opioid Analgesic Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS)

education requirement issued by the FDA in September, 2018. The FDA has added RNs

as a target group for this important education in an effort to expand and improve knowledge about the

significant healthcare challenge of opioid use and misuse. This program is designed for all RNs and APRNs

to help address the Opioid Crisis, we are excited to be able to provide cutting-edge information on such an

important issue.

The Nurse Practitioner Healthcare Foundation is a non-profit organization with the mission of improving

health status and quality of care through NP innovations in clinical care, research, education, health policy,

and philanthropy.

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Keynote Speaker

2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Saturday, 5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Ernest J. Grant, PhD, RN, FAAN

Dr. Ernest J. Grant is the 36th president of the American Nurses Association (ANA),

the nation’s largest nurses organization representing the interests of the nation’s 4

million registered nurses. Ernest will speak on nursing leadership. A distinguished

leader, Dr. Grant has more than 30 years of nursing experience and is an internationally

recognized burn-care and fire-safety expert. He previously served as the burn outreach

coordinator for the North Carolina Jaycee Burn Center at University of North Carolina

(UNC) Hospitals in Chapel Hill. Grant also serves as adjunct faculty for the UNC-Chapel

Hill School of Nursing, where he works with undergraduate and graduate nursing

students in the classroom and clinical settings. Grant is frequently sought out for his expertise as a clinician

and educator.

Grant holds a BSN degree from North Carolina Central University and MSN and PhD degrees from the

University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He was inducted as a fellow into the American Academy

of Nursing in 2014. He is the first man to be elected to the office of president of the American Nurses

Association.

General Session

Sunday, 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

When Medical Errors Become Criminal Charges

Closing Plenary Speaker

Sunday, 10:15 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

Lynn Pierce, BSN, RN, CPHRM

Lynn Pierce is a risk control consultant for CNA. Prior to joining CNA, she worked

in such clinical settings as emergency, surgical and critical care, and cardiac and

orthopedic rehabilitation services. Lynn will present “Stay a Real Super Hero: Don’t

Become a Malpractice Case Study.”

She has served as a director of risk management in acute care hospitals and integrated

health care systems and has held leadership positions in risk management, quality,

HIPAA privacy, environmental and patient safety, case management, corporate

compliance, Workers’ Compensation and infection prevention. She earned her BSN

from the University of West Georgia in Carrollton, Georgia and is currently pursuing a MSN-FNP with an

expected graduation of Spring 2020.

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Friday

2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

2019 Presenters

A Haven and a Nest” Caregivers’ Early Experience at the Nurse-Led Dementia Medical Home

Presenter: Mariya Kovaleva, RN, PhD, AGPCNP-BC

Post-Doctoral Scholar, Research

Vanderbilt University School of Nursing

Does Premature Birth Contribute to the Increase in Chronic Kidney Disease?

Presenter: Bobby Bellflower, DNSc, APRN, NNP-BC, FAANP

Associate Professor and Director,

Doctor of Nursing Practice Program

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center

College of Nursing

The Macroeconomic Benefits of Tennessee APRNs Having Full Practice Authority (FPA)

Presenter: Tracey Stansberry, MSN, APN, AOCN

Advanced Practice Nurse

Tennessee Plateau Oncology

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

The Macroeconomic Benefits of Tennessee APRNs Having Full Practice Authority (FPA) - Continued

Co-Presenter: Cyril Chang, Ph.D

Professor of Economics, Emeritus and Former Director

Methodist Le Bonheur Center for Healthcare Economics,

University of Memphis

Co-Presenter: David Mirvis, MD

Physician and Professor Emeritus

University of Tennessee Health Science Center

Co-Presenter: Carole Myers, PhD, RN, FAAN

Professor

University of Tennessee - Knoxville

College of Nursing

Saturday

Suicide Risk and Prevention Among Nurses

Presenter: Leslie Welch Hopkins, DNP, APRN, BC, FNP-BC, ANP-C

AGPCNP Academic Director/Assistant Professor

Vanderbilt University School of Nursing

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Saturday - Continued

A Dualistic Potential for Danger — When Nurse and Person with Substance

Use Disorder Vulnerability Collide

Presenter: Kendrea Todt, PhD(c ), MSN, RN

Instructor - Undergraduate Programs

East Tennessee State University

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Will you

take the pledge?

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

msu.rnbsn@murraystate.edu

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

2019 Membership Assembly Rules & Information

Membership Assembly (MA) General Rules of Order

1. All TNA members may speak. Before addressing the MA, it is necessary to secure the floor by going to a

nearby microphone. After recognition by the President, the member shall state his or her name and district

before speaking.

2. Any TNA member may make motions.

3. All motions shall be presented to the President in writing on the forms provided.

4. Only emergency motions or courtesy resolutions may be presented outside of the reference process.

5. TNA members shall be limited to three minutes when speaking.

6. No member who has already had the floor in debate on the immediate pending question shall be entitled to

the floor a second time until others who wish to be heard on the question have had an opportunity to speak.

7. The voting body shall consist of the Board of Directors, and TNA members in attendance.

8. Only the resolves of resolutions/proposals shall be acted upon by the MA.

9. The President may suspend the Rules in order to allow a nonmember to speak.

10. All cell phones, pagers and other devices shall be silenced throughout meetings during MA.

Guidelines for Discussion on Resolutions/Proposals

1. To facilitate discussion, comments will be limited to three minutes, and no member may speak more than

once to a question if someone who has not spoken wishes to do so.

2. Individuals who suggest substantial changes in the wording of any proposal are asked to submit those

changes in writing before the hearing is adjourned.

3. Sponsors or the Reference Committee may perfect the resolution/proposal for presentation to the MA

after completion of the hearings.

4. The sponsor may withdraw a resolution/proposal at any point in the review process.

5. Only the resolves of resolutions/proposals shall be acted upon by the MA.

Continuing Nursing Education (CNE) Credit

RN participants attending CE sessions will be awarded contact hours. The procedure is as follows:

1. Complete the CNE Evaluation and leave it in the tray at the registration desk before you leave.

2. Complete an Attendance Verification of CNE Activity listing the sessions you attend. Participants

must attend an entire CNE session to receive credit.

3. Detach the yellow copy of the Attendance Verification form and leave it in the tray at the registration desk.

4. Retain the white copy for your professional portfolio.

Conference Badges

All meetings of the conference are open to registered participants. Badges must be worn to gain admission

to all sessions and activities. Exclusive of invited guests, attendance at any meeting other than the Awards

Reception, Welcome Reception or School of Nurses Luncheon requires the payment of at least one day’s

registration.

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

111th Membership Assembly Agenda

October 18-20, 2019 | Memphis Hilton | 939 Ridge Lake Blvd | Memphis, TN 38120

Friday, October 18, 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 p.m.

Call to Order and Pledge of Allegiance – Haley Vance, TNA President

Greetings – Haley Vance

Greetings – Alyssa Soto, TSNA President

Recognition of members or those with family members in the Armed Forces – Haley Vance

Introduction of Reference Committee – Alvin Jeffery, Chair

Adoption of the Membership Assembly Agenda – Haley Vance

Adoption of Rules of Order – Donna Copenhaver, TNA Secretary

Treasurer’s Report – Heather Jackson, TNA Treasurer

Nightingale Tribute/Moment of Silence – Julie Hamm, TNA Vice President

Slate of Candidates/Nominations – Diane Butler, Nominating Committee Chair

Candidate Statements

Announcements – Tina Gerardi, TNA Executive Director

Recess – Haley Vance

Saturday, October 19, 8:30 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

Call to Order – Haley Vance

Introduction of Parliamentarian – Haley Vance

Updates on 2018 Resolutions – Haley Vance

Introduction of 2019 Resolutions – Alvin Jeffery

Introduction of Staff – Tina Gerardi

Executive Director Remarks – Tina Gerardi

Introduction of Bylaws Proposals – Trish Baise

Announcements – Tina Gerardi

Recess – Haley Vance

Saturday, October 19, 4:30 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.

Call to Order – Haley Vance

Bylaws Proposals Continued – Trish Baise

Recess – Haley Vance

TN Nurse PAC Live Auction

Sunday, October 20, 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Call to Order – Haley Vance

Unfinished Business – Haley Vance

President’s Address – Haley Vance

Report of Tellers – Diane Butler

Introduction of New Board President and Members – Haley Vance

Board of Directors Oath of Office – Tina Gerardi

Announcements, PAC and TNF Contributions – Tina Gerardi

Remarks/Adjournment – Carla Kirkland

SEE YOU IN FRANKLIN, OCTOBER 30 – NOVEMBER 1, 2020 | COOL SPRINGS MARRIOTT

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Disclosures to Participants

Outcome

Participants will gain knowledge and new tools to integrate into their practice.

Contact Hour Credit

Participants at the 2019 TNA & TSNA Joint Conference can earn a maximum of 10-11 contact

hours for attending.

Official Accreditation Statement

The Tennessee Nurses Association is approved as a provider of nursing continuing professional

development by the South Carolina Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses

Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

Requirements for Successful Completion for Continuing Education Credit

To receive contact hour credit for each session attended, attendees must

• Visit at least ten posters

• Be seated in the session room no later than five minutes after it has started.

• Remain in the session until the scheduled ending time.

• Complete and submit the Evaluation Form(s) and the Verification of Attendance/Certificate

Form listing each session attended. Turn in the yellow copy before you leave the conference.

Conflicts of Interest

The ANCC has established guidelines whereby all speakers must disclose any affiliations which may

cause a conflict of interest.

A Conflict of Interest occurs when an individual has an opportunity to affect educational content about

health-care products or services of a commercial interest with which she/he has a financial relationship.

No conflicts of interest were disclosed.

Commercial Support

Sponsors have made contributions to Tennessee Nurses Association in support of the 2019 TNA & TSNA

Joint Conference. See handout included in the conference packet for a final list.

Non-Endorsement of Products

The Tennessee Nurses Association’s approved provider status refers only to continuing nursing education

activities and does not imply that there is real or implied endorsement of any product, service, or company

referred to in this activity nor of any company subsidizing costs related to the activity.

Off-label Product Use

This CNE activity does not include any unannounced information about off-label use of a product for a

purpose other than that for which it was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Introduction to Robert’s Rules of Order

What Is Parliamentary Procedure?

It is a set of rules for conduct at meetings that allows everyone to be heard and to make decisions without

confusion.

Why is Parliamentary Procedure Important?

Because it’s a time tested method of conducting business at meetings and public gatherings. It can be

adapted to fit the needs of any organization. Today, Robert’s Rules of Order newly revised is the basic

handbook of operation for most clubs, organizations and other groups. So it’s important that everyone

know these basic rules!

Organizations using parliamentary procedure usually follow a fixed order of business.

Below is a typical example:

1. Call to order.

2. Roll call of members present.

3. Reading of minutes of last meeting.

4. Officers reports.

5. Committee reports.

6. Special orders – Important business previously designated for consideration at this meeting.

7. Unfinished business.

8. New business.

9. Announcements.

10. Adjournment.

The method used by members to express themselves is in the form of moving motions. A motion is a

proposal that the entire membership take action or a stand on an issue. Individual members can:

1. Call to order.

2. Second motions.

3. Debate motions.

4. Vote on motions.

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

There are four Basic Types of Motions:

1. Main Motions: The purpose of a main motion is to introduce items to the membership for their

consideration. They cannot be made when any other motion is on the floor, and yield to privileged,

subsidiary, and incidental motions.

2. Subsidiary Motions: Their purpose is to change or affect how a main motion is handled, and is voted

on before a main motion.

3. Privileged Motions: Their purpose is to bring up items that are urgent about special or important

matters unrelated to pending business.

4. Incidental Motions: Their purpose is to provide a means of questioning procedure concerning other

motions and must be considered before the other motion.

How are Motions Presented?

1. Obtaining the floor

a. Wait until the last speaker has finished.

b. Rise and wait in line at microphone.

c. Wait until the Chairman recognizes you.

2. Make Your Motion

a. Speak in a clear and concise manner.

b. Always state a motion affirmatively. Say, “I move that we ...” rather than,

“I move that we do not ...”.

c. Avoid personalities and stay on your subject.

3. Wait for Someone to Second Your Motion

4. Another member will second your motion or the Chairman will call for a second.

5. If there is no second, your motion is lost.

6. The Chairman States Your Motion

a. The Chairman will say, “it has been moved and seconded that we ...” Thus placing your motion

before the membership for consideration and action.

b. The membership then either debates your motion, or may move directly to a vote.

c. Once your motion is presented to the membership by the chairman it becomes “assembly

property”, and cannot be changed by you without the consent of the members.

7. Expanding on Your Motion

a. The time for you to speak in favor of your motion is at this point in time, rather than at

the time you present it.

b. The mover is always allowed to speak first.

c. All comments and debate must be directed to the chairman.

d. Keep to the time limit for speaking that has been established.

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

e. The mover may speak again only after other speakers are finished, unless called upon

by the Chairman.

8. Putting the Question to the Membership

a. The Chairman asks, “Are you ready to vote on the question?”

b. If there is no more discussion, a vote is taken.

c. On a motion to move the previous question may be adapted.

Voting on a Motion:

The method of vote on any motion depends on the situation and the by-laws of policy of your

organization. There are five methods used to vote by most organizations, they are:

1. By Voice – The Chairman asks those in favor to say, “aye”, those opposed to say “no”. Any member

may move for an exact count.

2. By Roll Call – Each member answers “yes” or “no” as his name is called. This method is used when a

record of each person’s vote is required.

3. By General Consent – When a motion is not likely to be opposed, the Chairman says, “if there is no

objection ...” The membership shows agreement by their silence, however if one member says, “I

object,” the item must be put to a vote.

4. By Division – This is a slight verification of a voice vote. It does not require a count unless the chairman

so desires. Members raise their hands or stand.

5. By Ballot – Members write their vote on a slip of paper; this method is used when secrecy is desired.

There are two other motions that are commonly used that relate to voting.

1. Motion to Table – This motion is often used in the attempt to “kill” a motion. The option is always

present, however, to “take from the table”, for reconsideration by the membership.

2. Motion to Postpone Indefinitely – This is often used as a means of parliamentary strategy and allows

opponents of motion to test their strength without an actual vote being taken. Also, debate is once

again open on the main motion.

Parliamentary Procedure is the best way to get things done at your meetings.

But, it will only work if you use it properly.

1. Allow motions that are in order.

2. Have members obtain the floor properly.

3. Speak clearly and concisely.

4. Obey the rules of debate.

Most importantly, BE COURTEOUS.

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

TNA Proposed Bylaws

Amendment

Number & Section

Amendment #1

Article I. Name,

Purposes and

Mission

Section 2. Mission

and Purposes

Amendment #2

Article I. Name,

Purposes, and

Mission

Section 3.

Functions

Amendment #3

Article II.

Membership

Section 3.

Qualifications

Amendment #4

Article IV. TNA

Membership

Assembly

Section 2.

Composition and

Appointment

Section 6.

Quorum and

Voting

CURRENT BYLAW LANGUAGE PROPOSED BYLAW CHANGE RATIONALE

The mission of the TNA shall

be to promote and protect the

registered nurse and to advance

the practice of nursing to in order

to assure a healthier Tennessee.

Ensure adherence to the “Code of

Ethics for Nurses” established by

ANA.

The TNA Membership Assembly

shall be composed of TNA

Members registered present.

A quorum for the transaction of

business by the TNA Membership

Assembly shall consist of fifty (50)

percent of the total TNA members

registered and present at the

Membership Assembly, plus five

members of the Board of Directors,

one of whom shall be the president

or vice-president.

The mission of the TNA shall

be to empower the registered

nurse; advocate for the practice

of nursing and champion quality

healthcare for all Tennesseans.

Promote and protect the

registered nurse and to advance

the practice of nursing in order

to assure a healthier Tennessee.

Promote Ensure adherence

to the “Code of Ethics for

Nurses” established by ANA.

d)Premier and Standard

membership pricing option

will be available in Tennessee

for as long as ANA sanctions

value pricing membership and

TNA has a written agreement

with ANA to participate in

this membership option. e)

State only membership will

be available in Tennessee for

as long as ANA sanctions

leveled membership and TNA

has a written agreement with

ANA to participate in this

membership option.

The TNA Membership

Assembly shall be composed

of TNA Members registered

and present.

A quorum for the transaction

of business by the TNA

Membership Assembly shall

consist of fifty (50) percent

of the total TNA members

registered and present at the

Membership Assembly, plus

five members of the Board of

Directors, one of whom shall

be the president or vicepresident.

Reflects change

made to the

TNA mission

statement

The TNA does not

have a mechanism

in place to

monitor and

police compliance

with the “Code of

Ethics for Nurses

established by the

ANA.

Reflects change

passed at ANA

membership

assembly

adopting

value pricing.

Allows for

potential future

change within

membership

options.

Presence not

registration

establishes

both the

composition of

the membership

assembly and

the basis for a

quorum.

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Amendment #5

Article V.

Nominations and

Elections

Section 1.

Nominations

Amendment #6

Article V.

Nominations and

Elections

Section 1.

Nominations

Amendment #7

Article V.

Nominations and

Elections

Section 2.

Elections

Amendment #8

Article VI. Board

of Directors

Section 2.

Composition

Amendment #9

Article VI. Board

of Directors

Section 5.

Responsibilities

The TNA President will serve

as a representative to the ANA

Membership Assembly and the

ballot will reflect it. Additional

representative(s) and alternate(s)

will be elected from the TNA/

ANA membership at large.

No member shall serve in

more than one elected office

at the same time. A member

serving in an elected office

which is not expiring may be

nominated for election to the

office of president-elect but shall

automatically vacate the first held

office upon assuming the duties

of president-elect.

ANA representatives and

alternates shall serve two-year

terms or until their successors are

elected.

The Board of Directors shall

consist of the elected officers of

the Association, the Immediate

Past President, and five Directors,

one each for Operations, Practice,

Government Affairs, Membership

and Education, plus the Chair of

the Presidents’ Council and the

Tennessee Nurses Foundation

(TNF) President.

confer district association status

on groups meeting qualifications

established in these Bylaws

The TNA President will

serve as a representative

to the ANA Membership

Assembly by virtue of

elections as the President.

and the ballot will reflect it.

Additional representative(s)

and alternate(s) will be

elected from the TNA/ANA

membership at large.

No member shall serve in

more than one elected office

at the same time. Election as

a representative to the ANA

membership assembly is

exempt from this restriction. A

member serving in an elected

office which is not expiring

may be nominated for election

to the office of presidentelect

but shall automatically

vacate the first held office

upon assuming the duties of

president-elect.

ANA representatives and

alternates shall serve two-year

terms or until their successors

are elected or appointed.

The Board of Directors

shall consist of the elected

officers of the Association,

the Immediate Past President,

and five Directors, one each

for Operations, Practice,

Government Affairs,

Membership and Education.

plus the Chair of the

Presidents’ Council and the

Tennessee Nurses Foundation

(TNF) President.

confer district association

status on groups meeting

qualifications established in

these Bylaws and remove

association status as deemed

appropriate for failure to

meet district qualifying

requirements

Clearer wording.

ANA membership

assembly

representative is

an expectation

of the role of

President.

Clarifies

that ANA

membership

assembly

representation is

not considered a

second elected

office.

Allows for

scenario when

appointment is

indicated rather

than election.

All chapter

presidents are

invited to board

meetings. The

presidents’ council

is no longer active.

The TNF president

is ex-officio with

full voice with no

vote.

Clarifies the role

of the board in

holding districts

accountable

for meeting

requirements.

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Amendment #10

Article VI. Board

of Directors

Section 7.

Vacancies

a) In the event of a vacancy

1) in the office of President, the

vice-president shall become

president for the remainder of

the term but shall not fill the ANA

Member Assembly Representative

position;

2) in the office of President-Elect,

the office shall remain vacant until

the next election of the President

unless the Board of Directors, at its

discretion, orders a special election

by the membership;

3) in an elective office, the Board

of Directors shall fill the vacancy

by appointment for the unexpired

portion of the term;

4) in the office of the Immediate

Past President, the office shall

remain vacant.

5) The TNA officer who fills

the vacancy in the office of the

President will not serve as the

TNA representative to the ANA

membership assembly.

a) In the event of a vacancy

1) in the office of President, the

vice-president shall become

president for the remainder

of the term but shall not fill

the ANA Member Assembly

Representative position unless a

full ANA/TNA/DNA member;

2) in the office of President-

Elect, the office shall remain

vacant until the next election of

the President unless the Board

of Directors, at its discretion,

orders a special election by the

membership;

3) in an elective office, the

Board of Directors shall fill the

vacancy by appointment for the

unexpired portion of the term;

4) in the office of the Immediate

Past President, the office shall

remain vacant.

5) The TNA officer who fills

the vacancy in the office of the

President will not serve as the

TNA representative to the ANA

membership assembly

The appointed

President can

assume the

ANA member

assembly

representative

position

provided they

meet the same

requirement

as an elected

President.

Amendment #11

Article VI. Board

of Directors

Section 8. Duties

a) The President shall

1) serve as the official

representative of this association

and as its spokesperson on matters

of association policy and positions;

2) serve as the chair of the TNA

Membership Assembly, the

Board of Directors, the Executive

Committee of the Board, and as an

ex-officio member of all standing

committees except the Nominating

Committee;

3) appoint committees of the

Board as designated by the Board

and fulfill other duties as may be

required;

4) serve as the TNA representative

to the ANA Membership Assembly

and the ANA Leadership Council;

5) upon completing a term in the

office of president, shall serve as

the Immediate Past President on

the Board of Directors with full

voice and vote until replaced by

his/her successor.

a) The President shall

1) serve as the official

representative of this association

and as its spokesperson on

matters of association policy and

positions;

2) serve as the chair of the TNA

Membership Assembly, the

Board of Directors, the Executive

Committee of the Board, and

as an ex-officio member of all

standing committees except the

Nominating Committee;

3) appoint committees of the

Board as designated by the

Board and fulfill other duties as

may be required;

4) serve as the TNA

representative to the ANA

Membership Assembly and the

ANA Leadership Council;

5) upon completing a term in the

office of president, shall serve as

the Immediate Past President on

the Board of Directors with full

voice and vote until replaced by

his/her successor.

6) Facilitate the evaluation of the

executive director.

The President

has responsibility

to facilitate

the evaluate of

the Executive

Director.

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Amendment #12

Article VI. Board

of Directors

Section 8. Duties

e) The Treasurer shall

1) monitor the fiscal affairs of

the association, provide for the

expenditure of funds, and report to

the Board of Directors and the TNA

Membership Assembly; and

2) serve as chair of the Committee

on Operations.

e) The Treasurer shall

1) monitor the fiscal affairs of

the association, provide for the

expenditure of funds, and report

to the Board of Directors and

the TNA Membership Assembly;

and

2) serve as chair of the Finance

Committee on Operations.

The title of

“operations

committee” is

not reflective

of the scope of

the committee

which is focused

primarily on

finance.

Amendment #13

Article VI. Board

of Directors

Section 8. Duties

f) The Immediate Past President

shall

1) facilitate the annual evaluation

of the Executive Director;

2) serve on the Finance

Committee

3) serve on projects or other

committees at the request of the

President or Board of Directors;

f) The Immediate Past

President shall

1) facilitate the annual

evaluation of the Executive

Director;

2) serve on the Finance

Committee

3) serve on projects or other

committees at the request

of the President or Board of

Directors;

The facilitation

of the annual

evaluation of

the Executive

Director is the

responsibility of

the President.

Reorder

remaining

Amendment #14

Article VI. Board

of Directors

Section 11.

Meetings

a) Meetings of the Board of

Directors shall be held at least

twice annually at a time and

place determined by the Board

of Directors. Meetings can be

conducted electronically. Special

meetings may be called by the

President and shall be called

upon written request of at least

five (5) district associations or

five (5) members of the Board of

Directors.

a) Meetings of the Board of

Directors shall be held at least

twice annually at a time and

place determined by the Board

of Directors. Meetings can

be conducted electronically.

Meeting electronically will

constitute full attendance to

include quorum requirements

and voting. Special meetings

may be called by the President

and shall be called upon

written request of at least five

(5) district associations or five

(5) members of the Board of

Directors.

Specifically

articulates

that electronic

attendance

meets

requirements.

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Amendment #15

Article VII.

Directors

Section 3.

Responsibilities

Director of Operations

Has general oversight for

1)Review of TNA Policies and

Procedures

2) developing new policies and

procedures, as needed

3) participating in long range

planning

4)the work of the Bylaws

Committee, serving as the Chair

5) the work of the Operations

Committee

6) the work of the Nominating

Committee

7)the work of the Reference

Committee

Director of Operations

Has general oversight for

1)Review of TNA Policies and

Procedures

2) developing new policies

and procedures, as needed

3) participating in long range

planning

4)the work of the Bylaws

Committee, serving as the

Chair

5) the work of the Operations

Committee

6) the work of the Nominating

Committee

7)the work of the Reference

Committee

Participates in

1) review of TNA policies and

procedures

2) development of new

policies and procedures, as

needed

Nominating

committee

moved to

Executive

Director.

Operations

Committee

changed

to Finance

Committee

and moved

to Treasurer.

Policies and

procedures

are part of

the finance

committee

responsibilities.

Amendment #16

Article VII.

Directors

Section 3.

Responsibilities

Director of Government Affairs

Has general oversight for

1) development of a legislative

platform and health policy

agenda in collaboration with

other directors

2) monitoring legislation and

making recommendations to the

Tennessee Nurses Association

3) identifying legislative priorities

for introducing legislation

4) the work of the TNPAC

committee

Director of Government Affairs

Has general oversight for

1) development of a legislative

platform and health policy

agenda in collaboration with

other directors the GOVA

committee, serving as the chair;

2) monitoring legislation and

making recommendations to the

Tennessee Nurses Association

development of a legislative

platform, health policy agenda,

and legislative priorities in

collaboration with the GOVA

committee, the Board of

Directors and TNA staff;

3) identifying legislative

priorities for introducing

legislation

4) the work of the TNPAC

committee

More clearly

defines the

collaboration

of the director

with the GOVA

committee,

BOD and staff in

defining political

direction and

action.

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Amendment #17

Article VII.

Directors

Section 3.

Responsibilities

Director of Education

Has general oversight for

1) promoting and supporting

professional development and

education through statewide

planning and implementation;

2) participates in the planning of

provider CE events

3) the provider unit for Continuing

Nursing Education

4) the work of the CE review

committee

The Committee on education

review shall

1) implement the policies and

procedures of the continuing

education approval process;

2) review the continuing education

approval process and recommend

needed changes to the Board of

Directors;

3) serve as the approver unit for

continuing education; and

4) evaluate and advise the Board

of Directors on other issues as

deemed appropriate.

Director of Education

Has general oversight for

1) promoting and supporting

professional development and

education through statewide

planning and implementation;

2) participates in the planning

collaborates with staff to ensure

compliance with standards of

provider CE events

3) the provider unit for

Continuing Nursing Education

4) the work of the CE review

committee

The Committee on education

review shall

The work of the CE Review

Committee:

1) implementing the policies and

procedures of the continuing

education approval process;

2) reviewing the continuing

education approval process and

recommend needed changes to

the Board of Directors;

3) serving as the approver unit

for continuing education; and

4) evaluating and advising the

Board of Directors on other

issues as deemed appropriate.

Clean up of

language

and reflects

collaboration

with TNA staff on

event planning

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Amendment #18

Article VII.

Directors

Section 3.

Responsibilities

G) Nominating Committee

a) The Nominating Committee shall

be composed of five (5) elected full

(ANA/TNA/DNA) members

b) Membership will represent

diversity of scope of practice and

geographic location.

c) Members of the Nominating

Committee shall serve one (1)

two-year term. Two members shall

be elected in even years and three

members in odd years.

d) If a member of the Nominating

Committee is unable to serve,

the position shall be declared

vacant and the person next in line

according to the number of votes

received shall serve the remainder

of the term.

e) The Committee shall

1) request the names of candidates

for elective offices;

2) prepare a slate of nominees and

publish such slate at least sixty (60)

days prior to the annual meeting;

3) implement the policies and

procedures for nominations and

elections as established by the

Board of Directors; and

4) assume other responsibilities

for nominations as provided for in

these Bylaws

G) Nominating Committee

a) The Nominating Committee

shall be composed of five (5)

elected full (ANA/TNA/DNA)

members and report to the TNA

Executive Director

b) Membership will represent

diversity of scope of practice

and geographic location.

c) Members of the Nominating

Committee shall serve one (1)

two-year term. Two members

shall be elected in even years

and three members in odd years.

d) If a member of the

Nominating Committee is unable

to serve, the position shall be

declared vacant and the person

next in line according to the

number of votes received shall

serve the remainder of the term.

e) The Committee shall

1) request the names of

candidates for elective offices;

2) prepare a slate of nominees

and publish such slate at least

sixty (60) days prior to the

annual meeting;

3) implement the policies and

procedures for nominations and

elections as established by the

Board of Directors; and

4) assume other responsibilities

for nominations as provided for

in these Bylaws.

Reporting to

the Executive

Director

limits concern

regarding

the Board

of Directors

influencing the

slate of nominees

Amendment #19

Article VIII.

Presidents’

Council

Eliminate the entire Article

Presidents’

Council has not

been in practice

is not needed. All

district Presidents

are invited to BOD

meetings and

have full voice

with no vote.

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Amendment #20

Article X. District

Association

Section 3.

Responsibilities

a) The Bylaws of each district shall

1) provide that members meet the

qualifications as specified by these

Bylaws;

2) provide for the obligation

of members to pay dues in

accordance with adopted policies;

3) provide for the district president

to serve as a member of the TNA’s

presidents’ council. And, if the

president is unable to attend the

meeting, the President Elect or

Vice President shall attend the

President’s council meetings as an

alternate with full voice and vote of

the district president.

4) protect members’ rights to

participate in TNA and the district

association; and

5) specify the rights and obligations

of members.

b)Each district association shall

1) provide for Full members

(TNA/ANA/DNA) to nominate

candidates for representatives to

the ANA Membership Assembly in

accordance with these Bylaws and

adopted policy;

2) provide for members to

nominate candidates for TNA

offices and committees in

accordance with these

Bylaws and adopted policies;

3) submit district Bylaws and

proposed amendments for review

to TNA when requested.

4) provide such information to TNA

as required by adopted policies and

procedures; and

5) submit an annual report to the

Tennessee Nurses Association

office by March 1; and

6) comply with the requirements of

these Bylaws.

a) The Bylaws of each district

shall

1) provide that members meet

the qualifications as specified by

these Bylaws;

2) provide for the obligation

of members to pay dues in

accordance with adopted

policies;

3) provide for the district

president to serve as a member

of the TNA’s presidents’ council.

And, if the president is unable

to attend the meeting, the

President Elect or Vice President

shall attend the President’s

council meetings as an alternate

with full voice and vote of the

district president.

4) protect members’ rights

to participate in TNA and the

district association; and

5) specify the rights and

obligations of members.

b)Each district association shall

1) provide for Full members

(TNA/ANA/DNA) to nominate

candidates for representatives to

the ANA Membership Assembly

in accordance with these Bylaws

and adopted policy;

2) provide for members to

nominate candidates for TNA

offices and committees in

accordance with these

Bylaws and adopted policies;

3) submit district Bylaws and

proposed amendments for

review to TNA when requested.

4) provide such information to

TNA as required by adopted

policies and procedures; and

5) submit an annual report

to the Tennessee Nurses

Association office by March 1;

and

6) comply with the requirements

of these Bylaws.

Presidents’

Council has not

been in practice

is not needed.

All district

Presidents are

invited to BOD

meetings and

have full voice

with no vote.

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Amendment #21

Article XII.

Amendments

Section 1.

Amendments

with notice

a) The Bylaws Committee shall

receive proposed amendments at

least six (6) months prior to the

annual meeting.

b) Amendments proposed by the

Bylaws Committee shall be in the

possession of the Secretary of this

association at least two (2) months

before the date of the annual

meeting, or special meeting of the

association, and shall be appended

to the call for the meeting.

c) These Bylaws may be amended

with prior notice at any annual

meeting or special meeting of

the TNA Membership Assembly

by a two-thirds (2/3) vote of the

members present and entitled to

vote.

a) The Bylaws Committee shall

receive proposed amendments

at least six (6) four (4) months

prior to the annual meeting.

b) Amendments proposed by

the Bylaws Committee shall

be in the possession of the

Secretary of this association

at least two (2) months

before the date of the annual

meeting, or special meeting of

the association, and shall be

appended to the call for the

meeting.

c) These Bylaws may be

amended with prior notice at

any annual meeting or special

meeting of the TNA Membership

Assembly by a two-thirds (2/3)

vote of the members present

and entitled to vote.

6 months is a

long lead time

to propose

amendments.

Four months

allows sufficient

time for review.

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2018-2020 Legislative and

Health Policy Statements

Introduction: The Tennessee Nurses Association (TNA) is the professional association representing over

110,000 Tennessee registered nurses. This position paper outlines the basic philosophy of the TNA’s

Membership Assembly relative to health care policy which may be addressed by the Tennessee General

Assembly and the U.S. Congress.

Mission: To improve health and health care for all Tennesseans and residents of the state, advance nurse

leaders and the practice of nursing as essential to improvement efforts and transformational change, and

serve as the voice for professional nurses.

The American Nurses Association’s Code of Ethics outlines foundational provisions that

frame TNA’s initiatives and actions.

Vision: TNA supports a transformed health care delivery system that ensures that all Tennesseans and

residents of the state are able to access equitable and affordable essential services when and where they

need them. The transformed system envisioned by TNA is patient-centered, promotes inter-professional

collaboration and care coordination to improve patient outcomes and experiences, primary care and

prevention are priorities, value is emphasized, and there is expanded use of information technology to

promote efficiency and effectiveness.

Goals: TNA is supportive of initiatives that improve health and health care and advance the following goals:

Optimal health system performance, including:

Improved patient care experiences;

Improved population health; and

Reduced per capita cost for health care.

Access to high-quality, affordable and acceptable care for all Tennesseans and residents of the state,

including:

Provision of a standardized package of essential health care services provided and financed by public and

private plans with protection against catastrophic costs and impoverishment;

Expanded primary care capacity by allowing RNs to practice to the full extent of their license to provide

chronic care management, care coordination, and preventive care in primary care settings;

Enhanced access to efficient, cost –effective, high-quality, equitable, and comprehensive healthcare

services by allowing APRNs to practice to the full extent to which their education and training prepare

them;

Allow APRNs with appropriate training to prescribe buprenorphine to increase access to medicationassisted

treatment (MAT) to combat the state’s opioid crisis; and

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Full practice authority and enhanced participation in the delivery of care and policymaking for all

professional nurses, including:

Support for the Tennessee Board of Nursing as the sole regulatory authority over nursing education and

practice;

Adoption of the Consensus Model for APRN Regulation: Licensure, Accreditation, Certification, and

Education (2008);

Elimination of financial, regulatory, organizational, and institutional barriers to the practice of professional

nursing;

Participation of registered nurses on all local, state, and national health care advisory, policymaking, and

governing boards, committees, and task forces; and

Inclusion of APRNs as licensed independent providers (LIPs) in hospital licensure rules, health plans, and

health care facilities.

Assuring an adequate, competent and diverse nursing workforce to meet current and projected health

care demands, including:

Improved data collection and information infrastructure to inform policymaking, planning, and evaluation;

Promotion of higher levels of education and training through seamless academic progression, interprofessional

education of health professionals, and lifelong learning;

Funding for nursing students and faculty, including loan forgiveness programs; and

Support for nurse safety in the patient care environment, staffing effectiveness plans, whistleblower

protection, and bans on mandatory overtime.

Restricting the use of the title “nurse” to only those individuals who have fulfilled the requirements

for licensure as outlined in the state’s nurse practice act. Nurse practice acts describe entry level

qualifications such as education, practice standards and code of conduct for continued privilege to

practice nursing.

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Thank you to our Sponsors who make our 2019

Conference a huge success!

(At Press Time)

Gold Level Sponsorship

Silver Level Sponsorship

Bronze Level Sponsorship

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Exhibitors

AccuVein

AbilisHealth

Arkansas State University

Aureus Medical Group

Baptist Memorial College of Health Science

Comfort Care Hospice

Footbar Walker GANM, LLC

Freeman Financial Group

Genentech

The Gideons International

Hurst Review Services

Janssen Pharmaceuticals

Jefferson Regional Medical Center

King University

Memphis and Shelby County Pediatric Group

National Healthcare Corporation

North Mississippi Medical Center

SIPS Consults

Sprint

University of Tennessee Health Science Center, College of Nursing

University of Tennessee at Knoxville, College of Nursing

Vanderbilt University College of Nursing

Walden University

Westberg Institute for Faith Community Nursing

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Schools of Nursing Luncheon Sponsors

Belmont University

Chamberlain University

Christian Brothers University

Cumberland University

East Tennessee State University

Harding University

Lipscomb University

Mississippi University for Women

Tennessee Wesleyan College

William Carey University

Superheroes of TNA

Tina Gerardi

Carla Kirkland

AbilisHealth

Chamberlain University

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Tennessee Nurses Association

District Map

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

TNA Board of Directors and Staff

TNA Staff

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Tennessee Nurses Association

2019 Slate of Candidates and Statements

SECRETARY – VOTE FOR ONE (1)

Jennifer (Jeny) Conrad-Rendon, NP-C

District 1

Family Nurse Practitioner

Healthy Life

Arlington

I would be honored to serve as your TNA Secretary. I feel that it is my responsibility to give back to our

amazing profession and help it to become the strongest and best it can be. I have experience in the role of a

secretary as I have volunteered as the secretary for a local booster club.

My calling to be a nurse came from my inspirational cousin who is a nurse. It began with becoming a CNA

where I worked in home health. From there my AA degree, BSN degree, and MSN degree were completed.

My almost 20 years of being a registered nurse consists of just about every aspect of nursing: Labor &

Delivery, Oncology, Primary Care, Cardiology, Behavioral Health, and Pediatrics. I was an RN for ten years

before I became an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse in 2009. As a Family Nurse Practitioner, I became

an entrepreneur and owned a primary care clinic for approximately 5.5 years and grew it to approximately

1800 patients. I have also helped grow a new concept in a business that provides preventive physicals. We

took these preventive physicals to patients at their workplace via Mobile clinics/vans staffed with an FNP

and EMT. We grew it in a 2-year timespan from no van runs to thirty a month.

Full Practice Authority is critical as APRNs should be able to practice to the full extent of our education. I

have been very active in this important fight and have started a petition, contacted and met with legislators,

started several social media pages to educate others on FPA and help increase the participation among

nurses in this important fight. I have testified to the TN Senate on Insure TN because access to healthcare

should be one of our basic rights and no one should be without healthcare.

I strongly believe that a true leader helps to build others up into the best person they can be. When people

feel appreciated and respected, they tend to be happy and that reflects on to their care towards their

patients. I am the type who is eager to learn new things and quick to jump in to help wherever it is needed.

I am beyond ready for this next level of advancement in my passion for the nursing profession. Teamwork is

crucial for success to advance our profession and I look forward to being part of the TNA team.

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Susan Smith, MSN, RN

District 3

Senior Director, Case Management Clinical Informatics

LifePoint Health

Columbia

I am a clinical informatics leader with a strong healthcare background and deep clinical knowledge, who

expertly leads in the analysis, planning, implementation and management of clinical information systems as

related to clinical informatics, insuring alignment and implementation of technology to support operations.

Possessing a reputation for collaborating with, and representing, the collective interests of the executive

team, medical staff, nursing and other clinicians, IT department and other users of the system. I have a

diverse background in healthcare including emergency department nursing, clinical revenue integrity and

compliance. I work directly with clinical end users to facilitate the integration of data, information, and

knowledge to support patients and caregivers in their decision-making in all roles and settings to provide

quality and safe patient care.

I am a member of HIMSS, American Nurse Informatics Association, the American Nurses Association and

the Tennessee Nurses Association. I am passionate about educating clinical staff to grow their knowledge of

informatics and information technology to deliver quality care in a safe environment.

DIRECTOR – GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS – VOTE FOR ONE (1)

Marcia Barnes, DNP, APRN, ACNP-BC, CWS

District 15

Assistant Professor

Cumberland University

Lebanon

I have been a member of TNA for many years and currently the president of District 15. It is my desire to

be active and give back to the nursing profession through TNA. I am a strong advocate for independent

practice for advanced practice nurses and feel it is as much my responsibility as any other APN to be

involved and advocate for not only APNs but Tennesseans. I believe all nurses should be allowed to practice

to their full scope and education. I served as Chair of the Government Affairs Committee this past year and

embraced the opportunity to learn about the legislative process. This solidified for me that collaborating

with legislators through TNA independent practice will become a reality.

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Susan Cortez, Ph.D., MBA/HCM, BSN, RN, HIMSS HIT

District 1

Fulltime faculty in the Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program

Chamberlain University

Memphis

I have a variety of staff nursing and executive leadership experience. I graduated from Duquesne University

in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania with a BSN and minor in psychiatric nursing. I worked as a psychiatric staff nurse

and simultaneously a staff nurse on a medical and surgical floor. I continued working as a staff nurse and

a circulator nurse. After I received a Master’s in Business Administration and Health Care Management, I

accepted an executive nurse position with executive operations responsibility for a new ambulatory surgery

center currently under construction, while simultaneously the Director of a laparoscopic inpatient-surgery

department, and Director of a different 15-suite inpatient operating room department. I next accepted fulltime

work in the Evidence-Based Medicine and Informatics department at Vanderbilt University Medical

Center. I completed my Ph.D. dissertation research on Evidence-Based Nursing Practice and Computerized

Clinical Decision Support in 2014. I taught DNP intensive classes at the Vanderbilt School of Nursing, and

for six years, I mentored six to eight staff nurses and other professionals in a year-long fellowship program. I

also facilitated learning for nurse leaders in the medical center on evidence-based practice, quality metrics,

and process control. I have published and have experience in mentoring nurses through study proposals,

IRB, analysis, and writing for publication. I was the subject matter expert in creation of the Nursing

Informatics Masters Program at the University of Phoenix, Tempe Campus. I am full time faculty in the

Doctorate of Nursing Practice Program at Chamberlain University.

DIRECTOR – OPERATIONS– VOTE FOR ONE (1)

J. Ted Nelson, MSN, RN, NEA-BC, CCRN-K, FACHE

District 4

Associate Chief Nursing Officer

Erlanger Health System

Soddy Daisy

My experience and education have equipped me to contribute to our Nursing Profession across the

State of Tennessee as the Director of Operations for the Tennessee Nurses Association. I graduated from

Chattanooga State Community College with my Associate of Science in Nursing in 2010, Bachelor of

Science in Nursing in 2012, and Master of Science in Nursing (Administration) in 2016 from East Tennessee

State University. Currently, I am pursuing a dual degree (Doctor of Nursing Practice and Master’s in Business

Administration) at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.

I have been Associate Chief Nursing Officer at the Erlanger Health System in Chattanooga, Tennessee for

the last 18 months. I have the leadership responsibility for the main campus which including providing

oversight of clinical operations with scope including approximately 600 FTEs; facilitating physician relations

by enabling open communication and collaboration to improve overall clinical and financial operations;

responsible for ensuring adherence to nursing care standards as well as state and federal regulations

and promoting evidence-based practice in the clinical setting; contributes to the integration of systems,

programs, and support across the system with focus on business evaluation and development, continuous

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quality improvement, patient experience, and employee engagement. Additionally, I continue to serve in

several Professional Organizations in the Chattanooga area. I am the Treasurer, Secretary, & Webmaster

of the Chattanooga Council of American Organization of Nurse Leaders -Tennessee (AONL-TN), Board

Member of the Tennessee Nurses Association 4th District, Webmaster of the Chattanooga Chapter of the

American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, Governance Member of Zeta Alpha Chapter of Sigma Theta

Tau International and member of the Sigma International Nurse Leader Review Committee.

DIRECTOR – PRACTICE – VOTE FOR ONE (1)

Colleen Moss, MSN, APRN, NNP-BC

District 3

Neonatal Nurse Practitioner

The Monroe Carell Jr Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt

Franklin

I would like to be considered for a leadership position because I am interested in becoming more involved

with TNA. I began my nursing career in Vanderbilt’s NICU in 2001. After two years as a bedside nurse,

I joined Children’s Hospital Colorado as an neonatal nurse practitioner (NNP) in 2003. I returned to

Vanderbilt to join the NNP team in 2007. I currently am a full time NNP, splitting my time between a Level IV

NICU in an academic medical center and a Level II NICU in a community hospital in Columbia, TN.

I am also a full-time student, and I will finish my DNP program at the University of Tennessee at

Chattanooga in December 2019. I was awarded Outstanding DNP Student of the Year in April 2019. My

interests are in teaching, professional development, and mentoring. As a DNP student, I am learning and

focusing on the importance of evidence-based practice for delivery of safe, quality care to ensure the

best outcomes for critically ill newborns. Ultimately, I want to utilize both my clinical and evidence-based

practice knowledge to mentor new nurses at all levels in a collaborative team environment. Earning my DNP

is important for me to grow as a professional and be qualified to obtain a position with increased leadership

responsibility and opportunities.

Nursing emphasizes a commitment to continuing education and service. I have an interest in nursing

scope of practice and workforce issues. I am devoted to lobbying for full practice authority for APRNs. I

have spoken with legislators in the Tennessee General Assembly regarding the need for APRN full practice

authority, as Tennessee has one of the most restrictive practice environments in the United States. As an

advanced practice nurse, I want to positively impact the profession through service in TNA.

Laura Reed, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC

District 1

Assistant Professor/FNP Concentration Coordinator

University of Tennessee Health Science Center

Memphis

I am currently serving as the Director- Practice for TNA and am seeking a second term. During my tenure

on the board, I have seen the need to expand the scope of practice for ALL nurses in Tennessee not just

APRNs. I would like to continue to be a part of the work that is currently addressing this issue along with

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workplace violence. All nurses deserve a safe environment to work in. We need to begin to actively address

the issue of workplace violence toward nurses by patients, families, and co-workers. I have been an RN in

Tennessee for 33 years and have practiced as an FNP for 29 years in a variety of settings most recently in a

medically underserved clinic in metropolitan Memphis. My practice interest is providing care to patients with

complex medical conditions. I have established the role of nurse practitioner in three primary care clinics

in the Memphis area. I am also an Assistant Professor for the UTHSC College of Nursing and am the FNP

Concentration Coordinator. I am currently the president of the Greater Memphis Area Advanced Practice

Nurses as well as the secretary for the Access to Care Coalition. I am a member of ANA, AANP, and NONPF.

NOMINATING COMMITTEE – VOTE FOR THREE (3)

Mary (Petey) Elliotte, BSEd, DNP, NP-C

District 01

Clinical Associate Professor

Loewenberg College of Nursing, University of Memphis

Memphis

I have been a member of TNA/ANA for several years but recently (May 2019) became a Tennessee resident

moving from north Mississippi. I feel I am now able to be more active in TNA. I have been a Professor at

the University of Memphis for 12 years helping students become professional healthcare providers, both

Registered Nurses and Advanced Practice Nurses. I have, and continue to serve, on several committees

at the College of Nursing which has included the Tenure & Promotions committee, various administrative

interview committees, (most recently to fill the position of the Director of Simulation). As a faculty

member, we attend interviews for new faculty applicants and are allowed to interview them as well. Past

employment experience includes Director of Clinical Education at the Loewenberg College of Nursing at the

University of Memphis in which I was responsible for interviewing and selecting adjunct faculty to augment

full-time faculty. Administrative employment also includes Hospital Clinical Educator for medical-surgical/

critical care units and emergency department. Responsibilities associated with this position included

assisting with evaluating registered nurse applicants.

My goal is to become more active in the organization that has so much influence in my profession and

utilize my experience to help that organization, as well as the other healthcare providers across the State

of Tennessee. Based on my past experiences, I feel I would be a good fit for being a member of the

Nominating Committee.

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Hillary Sexton, BSN, RN, CCRN

District 15

Registered Nurse 4CC

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Murfreesboro

I have worked in Tennessee health care for almost nine years, first as a certified nurse assistant for four

years, then as a registered nurse for the past five years. During my time as an RN, I have served on the Burn

Unit Board for Shared Governance, worked with the quality improvement committee, and volunteered on

my unit to be a verified check-off for educational endeavors. This past year I was awarded Preceptor of the

Year on the Burn Unit at VUMC. Also, for the past two years, I have been a night shift charge nurse on the

burn unit and was a charge nurse at my previous hospital as well.

I have been volunteering since 2009 for a non-profit organization in various roles, facilitating leadership

conferences and leading regional volunteers as a Region Facilitator for the past three years. I serve the

National Alumni Association of Austin Peay State University as Vice President of Greek Alumni and on

the nominating committee for the association. I feel very comfortable as a leader and love to serve. The

nominating committee position integrates my current career, my past experiences, and continues to build

on my leadership and service to the nursing profession of Tennessee.

Thank you.

Raven Wentworth, DNP, RN, APRN, AGPCNP-BC, FNP-BC

District 6

Associate Professor of Nursing: Nurse Practitioner

Freed-Hardeman University/Walk-In Medical Clinic of Linden

Jackson

I have had the opportunity to be actively involved with TNA since January of 2017 when the TNA district in

which I live (District 6) was revitalized and I was elected as President. Over the past two and a half years, I

have been able to learn about the policies that govern and the organization of the association. I have also

recently joined the TNF Board and will be serving as secretary. I am interested in serving on the nominating

committee so that I may continue to learn and serve my profession. It has been a pleasure to be part of the

professional group that is the “voice” for registered nurses in the state of TN.

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ANA MEMBERSHIP ASSEMBLY REPRESENTATIVE – VOTE FOR ONE (3)

Lisa Beasley, DNP, APRN, NP-C, RN

District 1

Clinical Associate Professor and Director of Clinical Education

University of Memphis

Memphis

I have been a member of ANA/TNA since becoming a nurse in 2006. Nursing is a second career for me, and

it is a career for which I have a great passion. The profession of nursing provides many opportunities for

nurses in a variety of settings. I strongly believe that if a nurse can belong to only one professional nursing

organization – that it should be the American Nurses Association and her or his state organization. I am in

education and administration at the University of Memphis Loewenberg College of Nursing. I am also an

APRN (Family Nurse Practitioner) and practice in hospice and palliative care in the rural counties outside of

Memphis. My passion is to serve and to be able to serve nurses and nursing as an Assembly Representative

would be one of the highest honors I could receive. Nurses advocate for patients, families and policy that

affect changes in lives and in our state and country. I can serve our members proudly by advocating for

nurses who do so much for so many. One of the greatest honors of my life is being a nurse and I would be

truly humbled to serve the nurses of Tennessee as an Assembly Representative.

Tina Gerardi, MS. RN, CAE

District 3

Executive Director

Tennessee Nurses Association

Nashville

I am a current member of TNA and as the Executive Director attend the Membership Assembly, but do

not have a vote. Being a Membership Assembly representative will afford me the ability to vote on issues

while in attendance. As a member of the New York delegation to the then Delegate Assembly, I represented

New York in that capacity for 24 years. I understand the governance of ANA and the expectation of the

Membership Assembly as outlined in ANA bylaws and policy. I currently serve on two ANA task forces and

would like the opportunity to represent TNA on the national level as a membership assembly representative.

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Tina McElravey, MPH, BSN, RN, NHDP-BC

District 1

Employee Health Coordinator

Shelby County Health Department

Millington

Results driven public health nurse with extensive nursing and administrative experience providing

evidenced based preventive health services to a large diverse metro community. History of successful team

leadership, driving performance, program improvement and quality initiatives. Dynamic, goal-oriented

problem solver with strong analytical skills. Instrumental in improving Shelby County immunization rates for

high risk population from 43% to 86% in three years. Instrumental in facilitating training of 350 participants

in National Disaster Life Support courses within 17 months. Strong nursing and public health advocate.

Extremely tenacious when advocating for community and fellow nurses. Dedicated desire to advance the

welfare and economic status of all nurses and to promote leadership and mentoring opportunities within

the state of Tennessee.

Carole Myers, PhD, RN, FAAN

District 2

Associate Professor

University of Tennessee

Townsend

I have a depth of knowledge and experiences related to policymaking at the state and federal level and

a robust professional network that I will use to benefit the Tennessee Nurses Association, as I have done

for many years. I will use my policy experiences and expertise and lessons learned from service to TNA to

advance the organization’s priorities related to health, health care, and our professional practice in the state.

ANA Membership Assembly Representative 2013—2019

ANA Delegate 2008-2009, 2010-2011, 2012-2013

Appointed to serve on ANA Presidential Endorsement Task Force 2018-2019

Chair of Tennessee Nurses Association (TNA) GOVA committee 2010-2016; member 2008-2019

Chair TN-PAC 1985-1988, 2007-2010

Inducted as Fellow American Academy of Nursing 2018

Senior Fellow George Washington University Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement 2017

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Selected AACN Faculty Policy Fellow 2017-2019

Co-Chair Tennessee General Assembly Scope of Practice Task Force 2016-2017

Nursing Lead and Secretary/Treasurer Tennessee Action Coalition 2012-2017

Fellow American Nurses Advocacy Institute (2011-2012)

American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP)-Advocate State Award for Excellence (2011)

Coordinator Graduate Certificate in Health Policy program at the University of Tennessee (UT) Associate

Professor UT: primary teaching responsibilities and research focus include health policy and services; have

joint appointment with Department of Public Health

Christine Reed, BSN, RN

District 5

Account Executive

Hillrom

Johnson City

As past president for TNA District 5 I would like to serve as a positive role model and advocate for the

nursing profession and spokesperson for TNA and ANA. It would be an honor and privilege to serve on the

ANA Membership Assembly as a representative from TNA.

Monique Rivers, MSN, MSEd, RN

District 3

Director, Quality Standards

HCA Healthcare

Nashville

I have been a member of the ANA and the State Nursing Association for nearly twenty years. My

commitment to the nursing association began as a nursing student. At the time, my professors stressed

the importance of membership in the professional nursing association. The exact quote that I remember

is “If you don’t speak for yourself, others will.” I cannot imagine the voice of the nursing profession to be

assumed by another professional. My clinical experience has included years in different types of hospitals

including a teaching university, non-profit and for profit facilities. I have transitioned from a direct bedside

nurse to hospital leader roles and currently, I work at the corporate offices of the largest healthcare

system in America. The time has come for me to use my years of clinical and educational experience and

make a meaningful impact. I want to represent the voice of nursing as an ANA Membership Assembly

Representative.

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Poster Presentation Abstracts

A Handoff Tool to Improve Patient Safety in Dialysis Care

Monique Rivers (Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Effective handoff communication practices during patient care transitions from one nurse to another

contribute to patient safety. A standardized handoff method, such as SBAR, provides structure to

communicate pertinent patient content for nurses to maintain consistent care during an in-patient

hospitalization. A dialysis specific SBAR can improve handoff communications that can impact the care of

dialysis patients.

Objectives:

To provide a standardized handoff process addressing components related to dialysis care.

Methods/Procedures:

Educational presentation of a handoff tool for nurses to use pre and post dialysis treatment.

Findings:

NA

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Recommend evaluating the SBAR tool to improve communication to yield nurse satisfaction with the

application of King’s Theory of Goal Attainment and provide safe care to a high-risk patient population.

A New Graduate Nurse Residency Program: Factors Impacting Retention

Problem Addressed:

Elisha Jerry (Presenter)

Sara Day (Co-Presenter)

New graduate nurses are the largest pool of registered nurses available for organizations to hire. Many new

graduate nurses struggle with the transition from novice to competent nurse, and an estimated 35% to

60% leave within one year of hire (Pine & Tart, 2007; Pittman, Herrera, Bass, & Thompson, 2013). Turnover

is financially costly and compromises quality of care. Nurse residency programs, defined as structured

post-licensure programs that incorporate didactic education, clinical support and mentorship, have been

implemented by health care organizations across the US to bridge the preparation-practice gap and reduce

the high cost of turnover (Van Camp & Chappy, 2017).

Objectives:

The purpose of this study was to determine if a new graduate nurse residency program at 6 Mid-South

hospitals affected the retention rate of new graduate nurses in relation to other variables, such as age,

gender, facility, nursing degree (associate, traditional BSN, accelerated BSN, Master’s), unit (medical/

surgical, critical care, emergency department, obstetrics/postpartum, peri-operative, pediatrics, neonatal

intensive care) and intern and/or extern program.

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Methods/Procedures:

2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

The study was a longitudinal, quantitative design. All new graduate nurses who entered into the residency

program from August 2014 through April 2017 (932 nurses) were included in the study. The retention

outcome was defined as continuing employment at year one. Termination at year one was used to measure

the retention outcome. The probability of termination at year one was modeled with demographic variables

as predictors in logistic regression framework.

Findings:

The probability of employment termination at year one was significantly associated with nursing degree

programs, age, facility (p


2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

established national standards for RNFA program curriculum, and these standards apply both to the nurse

who is non-APRN (Operating Room certified/CNOR) who may, or may not, be BSN-prepared and the APRN

who is prepared at the Masters or Doctoral level. AORN standards as of 2020 will require a minimum of BSN

education for the RNFA. To insure consistency and quality in the continuum of RNFA education, there is a

need for post BSN university based educational programs to assume a leadership role in education for the

RNFA .

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

The role of the RNFA is increasing in the state of Tennessee. This presentation will educate RNs/APRNs

on the state and national standards established for practice as RNFAs in the state of Tennessee. RNFAs

need to practice to the full scope of their licensure and education to ensure competent, quality care for the

perioperative patient. Educational programs must meet AORN national standards to allow one to be eligible

to sit for certification as a certified Registered Nurse First Assistant(CRNFA).These credentials denote

education that is evidence based and ensures safe perioperative patient care.

Best Practices for the Transition and Retention of New Nurse Practitioners

Problem Addressed:

Chaundel Presley (Presenter)

Nurse practitioner (NP) graduates are entering the workforce yearly at an ever-growing rate. Over the last

decade, the number of new NP licenses issued in the state of Tennessee each year has more than doubled.

The assumption is made that most of these first-time licenses are issued to new graduates. Despite this

tremendous growth, new graduates often struggle with initial job placements that are not a good match

with their background and training, not well supported, and often result in a job change within the first year

of practice. Meanwhile, data shows that there is a shortage of primary care providers and the population to

primary care physician ratio continues to grow. National projections indicate primary care physician demand

will continue to exceed supply. NPs are educated and prepared to help fill this healthcare provider need.

Objectives:

Identify and discuss some best practices for new NP’s, mentors and organizations to improve the transition

process and retention of new NPs. Articulate strategies that enhance transition into much needed primary

care practice roles.

Methods/Procedures:

An integrative review was conducted of the existing research related to NP transition into practice and job

retention, focusing on primary care settings. The Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature

(CINAHL) database was searched from 2004 through 2019. A specific focus was placed on the concept

of NP transition in relation to primary care and job retention. Search terms included transition, retention,

primary care and nurse practitioner. Studies with purposive sampling were included due to the limited

research on this topic area and to gain an increased perspective of new graduates. Excluded were literature

reviews, studies that focused on hospital or specialty care settings, concept analyses and unpublished

manuscripts.

Findings:

Findings to date indicate multiple trends in research regarding the transition process of new NPs into

practice that positively affect retention. Some of these include formal orientation programs that have

consistently shown a positive relationship to job satisfaction and retention. A formal mentoring relationship

has also been a positive factor. Other influences include participation in post-graduate training programs.

Also, organizations that support NP autonomy, their professional visibility and foster improved relationships

with administration have been shown to improve NP job satisfaction and transition into practice.

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Recommendations for Practice/Research:

The literature reviewed recommend a variety of future research that could be conducted to strengthen the

science on this topic. Research was recommended in relation to the organizational climate and its impact on

NP practice, transition studies that include more diverse populations, as well as studies correlating type of

NP program and the transition process. Outcome studies of post-graduate transition programs correlating

with the quality of care provided were suggested. Policy-related studies on the regulatory environment’s

influence on NP job satisfaction as well as future research focusing on new and alternative ways of

mentoring were encouraged.

Creating a Pillar of Safety for the Veterans We Serve Utilizing Stress Cards

Problem Addressed:

Teris Webb (Presenter)

Addressing Stress during the clinic office appointment. Research on military suicide is correlated to

exposure to stressful life events such as depression, posttraumatic stress disorder(PTSD), substance abuse,

poor sleep and financial problems. SHEP /Patient experience questioned asked of the veteran, “In the past

six months did you or anyone in this provider office talk about things in your life that worry you or cause

you stress?”

Objectives:

Create a pillar of safety for the veteran and the staff in creating a continuous improvement to determine if

the stress cards have made a positive impact on patient outcomes and SHEP scores /Patient Experience.

Will the presentation of the stress cards allow the veteran to be able to fully express their feelings,

insecurities, and emotions with the feeling of fear and discomfort.

Methods/Procedures:

Stress cards will be handed to each patient during any outpatient visit, mental health, emergency room, and

primary care visit.

Findings:

In 2016, the veteran suicide rate in Tennessee was 32.8% which is higher in comparison than National suicide

rate of 17.5%. National Veteran suicide rate is 30.1%

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

The goal of VA is to support the recovery process of the veteran and help them to live meaningful lives in

the society and therefore the distribution of the cards creates a safe space for the veteran to communicate

emotions and gain access to help. The stress cards when distributed will foster patient-centered care and

the veteran control of his/her plan of care.

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Creating Nursing Informatics Governance in an Academic Medical Center

Problem Addressed:

Ashley Trambley (Presenter)

Blair Stewart (Co-Presenter)

In an everchanging healthcare environment, it is important that the technology supporting patient care also

adapt quickly and efficiently allowing for continued safe and quality patient care. It is crucial for nursing

informatics and health information technology professionals to engage with nursing end users to identify

technology issues, prioritize those issues, and repair or improve the tools to meet the needs. The challenge

then becomes developing a format and structure that supports ongoing and continuous interaction and

collaboration between the informatics and health information technology teams and the direct care nurses.

Objectives:

1. Discuss and review the nursing informatics governance structure and model

2. Review evaluation data

3. Discuss keys to success for other areas looking to establish a similar model

Methods/Procedures:

After a large academic medical center made the direct conversion from a legacy system to a new electronic

health record in late 2017, the need for a governance structure to support this new integrated system

became apparent as the dust settled on the stabilization phase. After six to eight months of system use,

users began to reach out in mass with ideas for customization, optimization, and improved functionality.

Health information technology, end-user support and informatics teams, and operational leaders began

a journey to standup a nursing informatics committee that would provide strategic and operational

leadership in the management and advancement of nursing’s use of technology across the enterprise.

The committee structure is led by a Steering Committee comprised of operational leaders, informatics

leaders, and health information technology analysts that provide oversight for informatics activities, review

system enhancement and change requests to evaluate appropriateness and priority, and communicate

and collaborate with the institution’s higher-level informatics governance. From the Steering Committee

are three subcommittees for different practice areas (Inpatient, Ambulatory, Procedural/Operative) that

are overseen and facilitated by operational leaders and the informatics team. Subcommittee membership

is comprised of staff nurses, and these groups meet monthly to evaluate and make decisions on the

enhancement and change requests specific to those practice areas. In March, an Analytics subcommittee

was added with a goal of redesigning reporting dashboards and delivering meaningful and actionable data

to nursing leaders.

Findings:

This presentation will focus on the establishment and operation of this governance model, and it will review

the evaluation data. This structure has been in place for six months and just completed the six-month

evaluation. Feedback from the different teams who participate was collected via survey and has been

incredibly valuable and overwhelmingly positive about the structure. There were barriers identified that are

being evaluated moving forward, but the overarching goal and objectives for this undertaking have been

successful.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Not Reported

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Decreasing Falls in An Inpatient Psychiatric Unit Utilizing Shared Governance

Teris Webb (Presenter)

Madhuri Srinivasan (Co-Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Patient falls are estimated to cost hospitals $5,317 per patient fall and can cost $19,440 over a one-year

period. More than 20% of the falls result in moderate to severe injury. By 2020 , the cost of treating falls

is projected to exceed $54 billion. Joint commission (2012) has identified prevention of patient falls as a

national patient safety goal. Medicare and Medicaid Services have identified patient falls as one of the ten

hospital acquired conditions for which the hospital will not receive reimbursement for treatment.

Objectives:

Nurses are responsible for identifying patients at risk for falls. Since patient falls are direct indicator of care

given, it is therefore, nursing sensitive. Nurse-led safety measures is important to move to the culture of

Zero Patient Harm by providing patient centered care and improving patient satisfaction scores. Through

shared governance nurses can identify autonomous interventions to keep patient safe proactively. One such

strategy for the inpatient psychiatric unit at VA Medical Center Memphis is to study the role of purposeful

hourly rounding to prevention of falls.

Methods/Procedures:

Using Shared Governance nurses will focus on one strategy of purposeful hourly rounding to reduce the

number of falls in the inpatient psychiatric unit at the VA Medical Center Memphis. Through ownership

of the workplace, nurses will be able to bring about changes to their practice and work toward goals of

preventing falls.

Findings:

Previous research has shown that falls have reduced by 30% and the usage of call light by 36%. In 2014,

eight hospitals participated in an 18-month long study that falls had reduced from 4.001 to 2.613 per 1000

patient days because of purposeful hourly rounding. Stanford Healthcare developed Purposeful Rounding

Protocol and used it in their study of 14 hospitals and found that 52% of falls were prevented and 12%

increase in patient satisfaction scores.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Through Shared Governance, nurses can take the initiative to do purposeful rounding and contribute to

the reduction of falls. This will also help nurses to improve patient care outcomes, nurse engagement, and

reduce costs. Nurse leaders may support the initiative by educating the staff by addressing the benefits of

reducing the number of falls.

Problem Addressed:

Educational Interventions, Student Empathy and Interest

in Working with Older Adults: A Phased Study

Lisa Murphree (Presenter)

Shelley Moore (Co-Presenter)

As the population ages, there is a growing need for nurses who are interested in working with and

empathetic to the aging population, in particular with patients with neurocognitive disorders. Nurse

educators are challenged with preparing students to care for the aging population. An increased

understanding of the effect that educational interventions have on student attitudes could guide educator

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choices toward stimulating interest in working with the elderly, particularly with the vulnerable subset with

neurocognitive disorders.

Objectives:

Learners will be able to discuss educational interventions that may increase nursing student empathy

toward elderly patients with neurocognitive disorders.

Methods/Procedures:

Pre and post test data were collected using the Kiersma - Chen Empathy survey with undergraduate nursing

students enrolled in a gerontology course.

Findings:

Mean empathy post test scores were not significant; however, additional post test questions revealed a

positive impact from the gerontology course on student interest in working with the elderly population with

dementia.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Further investigation into educational interventions to foster student empathy and interest in working with

elderly patients with neurocognitive disorders is needed. The next phase of this study including specific

additional interventions and testing would be discussed.

Enhancing Health Related Goal Setting through One-On-One Education in an Inpatient

Substance Use Disorder Treatment Facility for Women

Problem Addressed:

Brittany Haskell (Presenter)

Women with substance abuse disproportionately suffer from negative health effects. While there is little

research on health education needs for women in recovery, goal setting has been found to be more

effective at creating behavior change than health education alone. At The Next Door (TND), an inpatient

substance abuse treatment facility for women, residents do not have access to one-on-one health

information.

Objectives:

This quality improvement project aims to create and implement a one-on-one health education program

with women at TND to improve residents’ confidence in setting health goals related to a health topic of

choice.

Methods/Procedures:

Over sixteen weeks, nursing students implemented weekly health education sessions with residents at

TND on the following topics: nutrition, women’s health, sleep and stress, and how to talk to your provider.

Residents were educated about how to set SMART goals related to health behaviors associated with the

topic. Residents completed a self-reported, pre- and post-survey measuring confidence in setting a healthrelated

goal.

Findings:

On average, 22.7% of TND residents attended educational sessions with 87.9% creating SMART goals. Oneon-one

sessions along with direction in setting SMART goals increased self-reported confidence in goal

setting related to these topics by 1.0 points on a 5-point Likert Scale.

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Recommendations for Practice/Research:

One-on-one health education sessions about health topics of choice along with education about setting

SMART goals with residents in an inpatient substance abuse treatment facility resulted in increased selfreported

confidence in ability to set a health related goal, which has the potential to positively impact

future health.

Problem Addressed:

Enlightening Nurses through Human Sex Trafficking Education

Jessica Phillips (Presenter)

The presentation explores the importance of educating nurses on how to identify, communicate, and safely

intervene with Human Sex Trafficking (HST) victims

Objectives:

1. Identify who is at risk of becoming a victim of human sex trafficking.

2. Differentiate barriers that effect effectively communicating with trafficked victims.

3. Define health effects of human sex trafficking.

4. Describe nurses’ roles and responsibilities.

5. Review intervention strategies to help aid in rescue and recovery of HST victims.

6. Recognize why annual education on HST is important

7. Bring enlightenment, confidence, and courage to intervene and advocate for HST victims.

Methods/Procedures:

The purpose of the study was to identify the need for education on HST within an Emergency Department

setting. The aim of the study was to compare changes in emergency department nurses’ knowledge of HST

before/after participating in a HST education. Specifically, participants’ knowledge of identification of HST

victims, communication with victims, and intervention strategies. A 24-question survey was presented to

nurses in an emergency department setting at two hospitals in the Nashville area before/after education

was provided by an End Slavery TN presenter.

Findings:

Seven nurses participated, three had master level nursing education and four had bachelor level nursing

education. The overall pretest average was 58%. The overall posttest overage was 86%. There was an

impressive 27% increase after education had been provided. A Wilcoxon Signed Rank test analysis through

SPSS elicited a significant change in the identification and communication category of the test and a slight

change in the intervention category. Although the sample size was small, the results showed significant

improvement in participants’ knowledge and reflected the importance of educating those on the front lines

of this community health crisis.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Recommendations for future research could include the development of a valid and reliable survey to assess

healthcare providers’ knowledge could prove to be beneficial as would the development of a reliable and

valid standardized assessment tool for identifying HST victims. Identifying the most important information

to include in developing an educational program could increase the validity and effectiveness of information

retained. Studies on the accuracy of nurses’ ability to identify HST victims, their ability to communicate with

them, and the success of their interventions would also empower nurses and other healthcare professionals

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to provide optimal care to these victims. This may also assist those who work with HST victims after rescue

to provide superlative rehabilitation and restoration to the victims. While the long-term effectiveness

of gaining knowledge during the study cannot be determined, the main goal of educating nurses is to

bring enlightenment, confidence, and courage to intervene and advocate on the behalf of those enslaved

by human sex trafficking and maximize the strengths of those that are on the front lines of healthcare

throughout Tennessee.

Evaluation of Safe Medication Administration Knowledge of Senior BSN Nursing

Students in Preceptorships

Problem Addressed:

Lisa Murphree (Presenter)

Medication errors continue at unacceptable rates in the US. There is a theory-practice gap reported in the

nursing literature that identifies low nurse confidence in pharmacology knowledge. Nurse educators need to

prepare nursing students with an adequate knowledge pharmacology base for safe entry level practice.

Objectives:

1. Participants will be able to identify how a clinical workbook can assist senior nursing students to

connect pharmacology theory with practice.

2. Participants will be able to identify characteristics of a preceptorship that increases senior BSN nursing

student medication administration knowledge and self-confidence.

Methods/Procedures:

This study design was a pretest-posttest quasi-experimental study which investigated the degree to which

two teaching strategies: senior-level preceptorships and a safe medication administration clinical workbook,

increased student knowledge and self-confidence of safe medication administration. The Safe Medication

Administration (SAM) Scale (Ryan, 2007) was used to assess knowledge. Data were collected from 28

nursing students and analysis was carried out using independent-sample t tests and mixed design ANOVAs

on pretest and posttest data comparing students in their usual preceptorship (control group) with students

using the clinical workbook in their usual preceptorship (experimental group). Self-confidence data were

collected using a modified NLN Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning Questionnaire, SSSCL-

SAM.

A 72 hour critical care preceptorship plus workbook was more effective in increasing student SAM

knowledge, learning satisfaction, and self-confidence than a 150 hour capstone preceptorship plus

workbook.

Findings:

Use of the workbook increased learning satisfaction and self-confidence, but not SAM knowledge.

A 72 hour critical care preceptorship plus workbook was more effective in increasing student SAM knowledge,

learning satisfaction, and self-confidence than a 150 hour capstone preceptorship plus workbook.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Increase faculty-student-preceptor collaboration w/workbook. Study effect of number of preceptors on SAM

and Self-Confidence. Additional current, validated SAM Instruments are needed. Highlighted need for evaluating

outcomes of preceptorships. Consider preceptorships with fewest possible preceptors.

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Problem Addressed:

2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Five Loaves and Two Fish

Raven Wentworth (Presenter)

Engaging students in a nutrition course using various teaching methods

Objectives:

1. Describe an assignment that blends components of multiple nursing courses

2. Identify benefits/barriers of the assignment

Methods/Procedures:

This engaging class assignment combined evidence with community needs and spirituality in a nutrition course.

Students enrolled in a nutrition course gathered into groups and identified a vulnerable population at risk for

malnutrition. The students then completed a review of the literature to identify various factors for malnutrition.

Students then planned, purchased, and distributed a nonperishable balanced meal based on nutritional guidelines

for the selected group. Students developed an insert with a Bible verse on one side and recommended dietary

guidelines for this selected population on the other. Each nonperishable meal and insert was delivered in a reusable

container. A written assignment of reflection was required after completing the assignment. A representative from

each of the four groups presented a summary at the University Scholars Day on campus.

Findings:

Student feedback was overall positive. Students were surprised by the numerous groups that needed nutritional

assistance in the community as well as how many nutritional meals could be purchased with a small amount of

resources.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Nursing faculty can use an assignment, such as Five Loaves and Two Fish, to incorporate community awareness

and spirituality in a nutrition course that is supported by evidence. Student engagement is enhanced when

students are required to identify a population at risk, develop a nonperishable meal in a reusable container and

deliver it to the identified group. The inclusion of a written reflection at the end of the assignment allows the

student to connect what was learned in theory to what was experienced.

Problem Addressed:

Healthy Nurse, Healthy Nation: ‘Nursing’ the Superhero in You!

Corley Roberts (Presenter)

Nurses make up the largest segment of healthcare workers, yet are less healthy than the average American.

Adding to the personal health of nurses is aging. According to research there are currently about one million

registered nurses older than 50 years of age. With age comes an increase in chronic diseases that can be

prevented or managed with the integration of physical activity. Recent research shows that 48.3% of adults do not

meet physical activity recommendations, and 71.2 percent of adults are overweight.

Goal:

It is the goal of the Healthy Nurse, Healthy Nation Grand Challenge to transform the health of the nation by

improving the health of its nurses by connecting and engaging nurses, employers, and organizations around

improving health in five areas: physical activity, nutrition, rest, quality of life, and safety.

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Objectives:

After viewing this poster presentation, the learner will:

1. Acknowledge that ‘nursing’ your personal health will help set an example for the health for your colleagues and

patients.

2. Identify your own personal health risks needing improvement.

3. Describe your physical activity improvement plan for health.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

1. Participate in physical activity recommendations of 150 minutes of cardiovascular moderate intensity exercise

weekly.

2. Participate in a risk and readiness assessment for physical activity.

3. Prepare a plan using SMART goals and track progress.

4. Connect with others for support and partnerships.

5. Maintain recommendations for water intake, dietary habits, sleep, and stress reduction.

6. It’s YOUR Move! Make it.

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How a Public Observation Assignment Affects the Beginning BSN Nursing Student

Problem Addressed:

Tammy Howard (Presenter)

Jenny Maffett (Co-Presenter)

Increased use of electronic devices such as smart phones, in our everyday lives has decreased personal awareness

of people and things, thereby affecting communication patterns, which is documented in the literature. College

freshmen majoring in nursing completed a public observation assignment. Pre and post surveys were collected

to assess the effects of the assignment upon student awareness of people and surroundings, including nonverbal

communication and general appearance. Therefore, laying foundational skills prior to entering nursing assessment

courses.

Objectives:

The objectives of the public observation assignment were to expose students to varied persons in a nonconfrontational

way, in order to lay foundational assessment skills through observation and general awareness of

others.

Methods/Procedures:

Pre and Post survey of Freshmen Nursing majors related to public observation assignment.

Observation Assessment Documentation Forms from each Freshmen Nursing participant.

Findings:

Findings will be presented on poster.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

The assignment will continue to be utilized for Freshmen Nursing majors with some minor edits regarding pre and

post survey specificity and assignment instructions.

Student participants will be followed as they enter assessment courses.

Problem Addressed:

Impact of Resiliency Education to Reduce Burnout in Newly

Graduated Registered Nurses

Katie Thomas (Presenter)

Newly graduated registered nurses experience burnout at a higher rate than more experienced nurses. Burnout, or

the feelings of exhaustion, cynicism, and depersonalization, is now a recognized medical condition. Moral distress

caused by discrepancies in expected work environment compared to reality is a primary cause of burnout in this

population of new nurses. Additionally, burnout is a primary cause of turnover in healthcare. Resiliency has been

shown to protect against the development of burnout. Introducing resiliency education into a nurse residency

program can lessen burnout symptoms and improve intent to stay.

Objectives:

The purpose of the poster is to demonstrate the feasibility of introducing resiliency education and tools into the

orientation of newly hired registered nurses in the acute care setting.

Methods/Procedures:

A review of the literature was completed, and an implementation plan to introduce resiliency education into a

nurse residency program in a hospital setting was developed. Implementation is planned for late fall 2019.

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Findings:

Resiliency can mitigate the stress of the workplace environment to protect against burnout symptoms in new

nurses. Education and organizational support can increase individual resiliency. More resilient nurses report higher

intent to stay.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Incorporating resiliency education and tools into orientation for new nurses can help to reduce reported burnout

symptoms and increase intent to stay. Retention of nursing staff is essential for patient safety and high quality care.

Implementation of a Medical-Legal Partnership for a Low-Income Community at a Nurse-

Managed Health Center

Problem Addressed:

Carrie Plummer (Presenter)

Jillian Scott (Co-Presenter)

The Clinic at Mercury Courts (CMC) is a nurse-managed, community health center serving low-income patients

experiencing homelessness in Davidson County, Tennessee. In 2017, 68% of CMC patients lived 200% below the

poverty threshold and 38% experienced extended periods of homelessness. A review of the evidence-based

literature reveals that health-harming legal needs (HHLNs) negatively impact health outcomes. CMC patients

report having HHLNs, which currently are beyond the scope of the services provided by the CMC.

Objectives:

1. To determine how best to integrate a medical-legal partnership (MLP) into the existing care delivery

infrastructure of the Clinic at Mercury Courts.

2. To identify the most common Health-Harming Legal Needs experienced by CMC patients

3. To identify necessary key stakeholders for successful establishment and integration of an MLP

Methods/Procedures:

Students established relationships with key stakeholders, including: 1) CMC leadership, staff, and patients; 2)

Belmont Law faculty, and; 3) Legal Aid. After obtaining IRB approval students conducted a focus group with CMC

patients to identify commonly experienced HHLNs. Qualitative data was transcribed, coded, and analyzed for

emergent themes.

Findings:

Twelve participants identified tangible (lack of transportation, mobility limitations) and structural (powerlessness,

lack of dignity) barriers to accessing care, as well as HHLNs, including: lack of health insurance, disability, and

records expungement. Participants highlighted the need for continuity and follow-through to establish a sense of

community, compassion, and trustworthiness.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Over the course of 6 months, a team of nursing students identified the steps necessary to integrate a medical-legal

partnership into the existing structure of the Clinic at Mercury Courts. In addition, they established relationships

with key stakeholders in both the community, the clinic, and consolidated the necessary academic partnership

between the nursing and law schools. This provides the next cohort of MLP students access to a network of

collaborators ready to engage in the next steps towards implementation of the MLP. Analysis of the focus group

data identified patient interest in and need for specific medical-legal services. Given the importance of continuity

and follow-through for patients, a continuous and structured leadership team will provide stability as students

cycle through each academic year.

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Implementation of a Self-Care Curriculum for Nursing Students in Guyana’s Largest Public

Hospital

Problem Addressed:

Shelby Gamble (Presenter)

Elna (Rose) Preston (Co-Presenter)

Akaninyene Ruffin (Co-Presenter)

Peyton Wohlwender (Co-Presenter)

Often in low-resource settings health care professionals lack adequate access to knowledge surrounding coping

mechanisms, trauma informed care, and self-care strategies that could help alleviate the high levels of stress that

they encounter daily.

Objectives:

This project will promote knowledge, use, and dissemination of information on self-care and coping strategies by

the Accident and Emergency (A&E) nursing staff at Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation (GPHC) in Guyana,

South America. The goal is to give nursing staff currently enrolled in GPHC’s Bachelor’s Programme in Emergency

Nursing the information needed to increase self-care practices in efforts to mitigate burnout rates.

Methods/Procedures:

Vanderbilt University School of Nursing (VUSN) students worked in conjunction with Dr. Jessica Van Meter to

create a four hour nursing curriculum on self-care, burnout, trauma-informed care, and coping strategies. This

curriculum was taught to A&E nursing staff during the spring of 2019. Knowledge of self-care and burnout were

assessed with surveys at baseline and reassessed two weeks and four weeks after presentation of curriculum.

Findings:

Our results indicated a shift in the student’s perception of self-care from “Basic Needs” to more “Holistic” and

“Health” focused. This shows that before our intervention, there was a different understanding of the framework

of what self-care is. Additionally, our survey indicated that a large barrier for students wishing to perform self-care

was a lack of resources. This shows that nurses cannot engage in self-care without having their basic work needs

met (appropriate pay, nurse to patient ratio, and schedules). Our results also indicated that further education about

self-care could be productive in order to continue the improvement of the participants’ confidence.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Previously Guyanese nursing education has not covered self-care. The positive outcomes of this intervention

encourage inclusion of self-care curriculum in standard nursing education. Continued use of this education at

GPHC with additional cohorts would increase the number of participants and allow for data analysis assessing

statistical significance. It could be efficacious to repeat similar interventions in low-resource and high-resource

settings to analyze the difference in results across cultures, geographical areas, or hospital units.

Problem Addressed:

Mac Attack: Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Infections on the Rise

Janet Mulroy (Presenter)

Pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial infections affect the most vulnerable members of our population, and

this opportunistic infection commands our respect and our attention. The purpose of this session is to emphasize

the importance of recognition, diagnosis, and multidisciplinary management of nontuberculous mycobacterial

infections, formerly known as Mycobacterium Avium Complex infections.

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Objectives:

1. Describe the incidence, host characteristics, and epidemiology of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections

2. Review the many challenges in the diagnosis of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections

3. Outline the treatment options and long term management of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections

Methods/Procedures:

lecture and discussion

Findings:

Nontuberculous mycobacteria are environmental pathogens which are present in nearly every water source.

Patients with weakened immune systems can become infected through everyday activities such as showering

or gardening and the incidence of infection is estimated to be between 12,000 and 18,000 people per year.

Nontuberculous mycobacteria are found in household and industrial water sources and may be transmitted as

a nosocomial infection. The rates of infection are much greater in those over 65 years of age and in those with

all forms of immunosuppression. The pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial infection creates irreversible

structural changes in the lung called bronchiectasis and bronchiectasis leads to fibrosis, impaired oxygenation, and

serious disability.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Treatment of nontuberculous mycobacterial infection requires prolonged courses of antibiotics with many

unpleasant side effects and significant potential for toxicity. The patients experience frequent exacerbations and

require extensive healthcare resources. Through heightened awareness, recognition, accurate diagnosis, and

multidisciplinary management of this infection, we will be able to make a difference in survival and improve their

quality of life.

Nurse Staffing & Patient Outcomes: A Systematic Review of the Current Evidence

Problem Addressed:

Jacqueline (Jackie) Frain (Presenter)

Elli McDaniel (Co-Presenter)

Renee Burton (Co-Presenter)

Nurses make up the largest population of healthcare workers in the United States and have a strong capacity to

affect change where they work and beyond, including healthcare finances. Previous research has correlated large

patient loads with negative outcomes, such as increased morbidity and mortality, longer length of stay, a negative

work environment, and financial losses.

Objectives:

The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the current and landmark literature related to nurse staffing

and patient outcomes to determine the effect of higher and lower nurse-to-patient ratios. Specific research

questions were:

1. Do nurse staffing numbers correlate with patient outcomes?

2. If so, (a) which outcomes are most affected by staffing ratios and (b) how are they affected?

3. What financial impact does nurse staffing and adverse patient outcomes have on hospitals?

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Methods/Procedures:

2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Methodology – Systematic review

Data sources – We searched three electronic databases for scholarly articles from dates January 2001 to

December 2018. Databases included PubMed, CINAHL, and Cochrane.

Review methods – Three team members independently searched for and located articles within the three

databases. Articles were then screened for validity and context within the predetermined inclusion and exclusion

criteria using rapid critical appraisal techniques. Articles that passed independent screening were then critiqued by

all team members to ensure appropriateness to the review. The final set of studies were assembled into evaluation

and synthesis tables to determine the heterogeneity of findings and to draw conclusions.

Findings:

Results – A total of 629 articles were found using predetermined keywords, of which fifteen satisfied the

predetermined inclusion criteria related to nurse staffing and patient outcomes. Five additional articles were

found that represented financial data or estimates. Thirteen of the fifteen studies were qualitative or descriptive

in nature. Only five studies adequately defined nurse staffing thresholds, and there was little homogeneity among

the definitions. The most common nurse staffing variables used were patient/nurse ratio (6/15), hours of nursing

care (6/15), and skill mix (6/15). Populations studied were mostly adult (typically ≥18 years old) (9/15), in multiple

acute care hospitals (12/15) with multiple unit types (11/15). The most frequently examined patient outcomes were

falls (5/15), HAPI (6/15), sepsis & hospital-acquired infections (including CLABSI, CAUTI, and VAP) (6/15), inpatient

mortality & failure to rescue (7/15), and length of stay (3/15).

Conclusion – Nurse staffing results from multiple studies demonstrate that higher patient loads are associated with

negative patient outcomes, including patient mortality, at statistically significant levels across the studies included

in this review. While there were many statistically significant associations, it is challenging to draw conclusions

on which variables were most affected due to the heterogeneity of the studies and results and lack of concrete

definitions of variables. The studies that cited financial implications show mixed data regarding the potential

cost savings of hiring more registered nurses, though they consistently demonstrate a cost benefit, with savings

estimates as high as $6.9 billion annually nationwide (Needleman et al., 2011).

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Not reported

Problem Addressed:

students engagement; nursing research; mentoring

Objectives:

Nursing Students and Research: Common Grounds

Esther Sellars (Presenter)

Present one approach to engage nursing students in implementation of research and provide an overview of

utilization of nursing research to guide practice.

Methods/Procedures:

Not reported

Findings:

As nurses, a lifelong expectation is that to improve and provide the best possible care to patients, one must utilize

basic efforts in reviewing and applying evidence to guide decision/practice. Students were challenged to start

the research process from the beginning, utilizing the PICO process, and develop an individual research project. A

systematic review had to be completed.

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Recommendations for Practice/Research:

The research process, samples of the project at various points- at the beginning, midway, and the final projects will

be presented. The growth of the students will be illustrated along with the appreciation of research to evidencebased

nursing practice will also be presented.

Problem Addressed:

Predictors of Uncompleted Emergency Department Care: Patients Who

Leave Against Medical Advice

Mary Jones (Presenter)

Uncompleted visits to the emergency department (ED) are a critical safety concern. Types of uncompleted visits

include patients who leave without being seen (LWBS) by a medical provider and those who leave against medical

advice (AMA). Patients who leave AMA often do so prematurely as evidenced by higher emergent hospitalization

rates compared with those who LWBS or those who complete their care (Ding et al., 2007). A study by Jerrad

and Chasm (2009) demonstrated that patients who decided to end their stay in the ED AMA and forgo further

evaluation have significant illness burden. In addition, a study by Garland et al. (2013) showed that adults who left

AMA had higher rates of hospital readmission and death, and elevated rates of readmission and death persisted for

180 days.

Objectives:

Define the characteristics associated with patients who chose to end their care prematurely within the Emergency

departments. The results will be used to improve the quality of ED care throughout the hospital system, and will

allow identification of the patients who are at risk to leave AMA. More importantly, these results will allow the

provision of interventions to decrease rates of patients who leave AMA.

Methods/Procedures:

The purpose of this study was to determine predictors of patients leaving emergency departments (ED) within

a system of five Mid- South hospitals and to add to the existing body of literature on this topic. We compared

patient characteristics and clinical conditions of ED patients who left AMA to those who completed care.

Completed care was defined as admitted to the hospital or discharged home. Patient characteristics included age,

gender, race/ethnicity, payor source and clinical condition defined by triage level.

Findings:

This study included a retrospective cohort of all ER patients (1,214,975) registered from July 1, 2014 to June 30,

2018. Out of the 1,214,975 patients, 20,294 patients left AMA (1.67%). Among the 20,294 patients who left AMA,

54.1% were female, while 45.7% patients not leaving AMA were male. Compared to patients less than 25 years of

age, age groups 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, and 55-64 were more likely to leave AMA, while patients 65-74 or >=75 years

of age were less likely to leave AMA (p


2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Quality Improvement Daily Weights in an Acute Care Settings Utilizing Shared Governance in

a VA Setting

Problem Addressed:

Marqueta Abraham (Presenter)

Teris Webb (Co-Presenter)

Noncompliance in obtaining daily weights leads to delays in establishing treatment and discharge plans(Crawford

2018) There are five important areas for patient weights they are: Dialysis , an injection fraction of less 40% .

Diagnosis of Heart Failure(HF), Congestive heart Failure(CHF), Fluid Overload, Elevated BNP greater than 100 and

Myocardial Infarction(MI)

Objectives:

The shared governance team for the acute care unit was composed of a multidisciplinary team in an acute care

setting. The group reviewed the present practice and also chose as the first project to review the policy regarding

daily weights and then set timelines to implement the project.

Methods/Procedures:

Using the Model for Improvement, where changes are tested in small cycles that involve planning, doing, studying

and acting (PDSA)(Jones 2019). This quality improvement project allowed clinicians to work with a team and

identify an issue and implement interventions that could result in true improvements in quality of patient care.

(Jones 2019)

Findings:

The results of the project affected the following:

1. Improvement on initiating daily weights order via a nurse driven protocol.

2. Ability to obtain accurate monitoring of a patient’s weight

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Process improvement can be applied to any clinical setting for improved care. The project showed improvement

is highly beneficial, positive process which enable clinicians to deliver true changes for benefit of themselves, their

organization and most of all their patients. In future process improvement projects hopefully momentum can be

gained to improve other work related problems.

Problem Addressed:

The Role of Safety Coaches in a Culture of Safety

Amy Perry (Presenter)

Safety Coach programs embed safety specialists from all disciplines to mentor others in safe practices. Coaches

reinforce communication and teamwork to promote safety and prevent patient harm. They contribute to a culture

of safety at the frontline of care. A robust culture of safety increases work satisfaction and reduces nurses turnover.

Objectives:

The evidence related to safety coach programs establishes the need for coach mentoring, opportunities for

coaches to share safety stories, and continuous training. The lack of a formalized safety coach program was

identified as a gap in practice. The translational project designs a quality improvement initiative to address this gap

by providing mentoring, education, and opportunities to further develop coaching skills.

Methods/Procedures:

This project applies the nursing theory of self-efficacy to assess the components of the Safety Coach role

perceived by coaches as areas of weakness. Initial measures of Safety Coach competence and unit culture of

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safety were taken using the Safety Coach Self-Efficacy Tool and the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire. Informed

by this assessment, training and mentoring is aimed at increasing Safety Coach self-efficacy to maximize the

effectiveness of the overall program. Following six months of interventions, the measures will be retaken to assess

the effectiveness of changes made to the Safety Coach program.

Findings:

Interventions and data collection are ongoing during the summer, and will conclude in early fall. Discussion of

findings will include the change in pre and post intervention scores on the Safety Coach Self Efficacy Tool and

Safety Attitudes Questionnaire. Qualitative measures include a pre and post intervention Focus Group related

to the challenges of serving as a Safety Coach. Projected findings include improvement in overall unit culture of

safety.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

The Safety Coach Self-Efficacy Tool was developed by the DNP student for the purpose of this project. Further

studies could include the validation of this tool at additional facilities with existing Safety Coach programs.

Additionally, the measurement of the effectiveness of such a program is necessary for evaluation by hospital

administrators. Further research regarding tools useful for this purpose are needed.

STIGMA: Stopping Traumatic Incidence through Governed Mental Health Awareness

Problem Addressed:

Brooke Epperson (Presenter)

Millions of people in the United States are living with a serious mental illness or substance abuse disorder with

the number of behavioral health patients being treated in the emergency department (ED) growing each year.

The behavioral health patient population deserve to be cared for by a trained nursing staff. ED nurses are trained

to handle dynamic and rapidly changing patient scenarios. While ED nurses participate in training focused on

advanced cardiovascular life support, trauma training, and pediatric resuscitation, one area that has lacked focus is

behavioral health. The purpose of this project was to measure the perceived competency and safety attitudes of

ED nurses at Tennova Healthcare in Cleveland, TN. This project utilized both qualitative and quantitative research

methods. The findings from this translational project may provide data that reveals the need for a continued

behavioral health competency program in the ED.

Objectives:

The purpose of this project was to measure the perceived competency and safety attitudes of ED nurses at

Tennova Healthcare in Cleveland, TN. The objectives of this DNP translational project included the increased

competency and safety attitudes of ED staff nurses. Training sessions using the Substance Abuse and Mental

Health Associations Trauma Informed Care and practice guidelines were implemented to increase knowledge and

skills for staff nurses providing behavioral health patient care.

Methods/Procedures:

This project utilized the Behavioral Health Care Competency Survey (BHCC) and the Safety Attitudes

Questionnaire (SAQ) tools to measure ED nurse perceptions of behavioral healthcare competency pre and post

implementation of a behavioral health practice guidelines and competency program. Along with the quantitative

data, this project will include qualitative data from ED nurse focus groups.

Findings:

At the time of this abstract submission, project interventions and data collection are ongoing. Analysis of project

results and findings will be completed by early Fall in time for presentation in October. Initial impressions of

findings are that emergency nurses do not feel competent or adequately prepared to provide appropriate care for

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behavioral health patients. An anticipated finding is the need for additional and regular training to increase staff

perceived competence and awareness of available resources.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Not reported

Utilizing Nursing Communication Cluster to Improve Patient Healthcare Experience

Problem Addressed:

Melinda Evans (Presenter)

Tamara McKenzie (Co-Presenter)

Nursing leadership recognized need to improve patient satisfaction scores and how well nursing staff was

addressing patient’s immediate needs on Memphis Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) Acute Care unit.

Acute Care (2 South) created a nursing communication cluster that included evidence-based practices to help

bridge the gap between caring and communication with the Memphis VAMC patient population. In addition,

this communication cluster would also improve communication practices between nursing team members. The

initiatives included: implementing bedside shift report (BSR), executing nursing leader daily rounding, nursing staff

hourly rounding, maintaining activated call light and providing patient service training to all nursing staff.

Objectives:

Nursing Communication Cluster was specifically created to:

1. Improve staff response time to patient call lights

2. Reduce the number of times patient used call lights through hourly rounding

3. Improve patient satisfaction and communication between staff and patients with Bedside Shift Report.

Methods/Procedures:

The first 90 days of the Communication Initiatives helped introduce the ideas to staff and to get members

acclimated to doing Bedside Shift Reports and Hourly Rounding the correct way. The project leader also

recognized that changing culture and mindsets takes time. The next phase (90-180) will be used to collect data

that will help usher in consistent and long-lasting change. During Phase 2, the unit will focus on data improvement

measures that demonstrate improvement in patient satisfaction scores. Additionally, a greater emphasis will be

placed on monthly customer service training that focuses on how to properly greet, connect and build rapport

with the patient.

Findings:

Pending outcome of Phase 2 of project (90-180 days) which include reduction in call light and amount of

time taken to respond, increase of hourly rounding documentation. As well as review of Survey of Healthcare

Experiences of Patients (SHEP) Scores 2019, Quarter 3/4.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Recommended to continue with implementation of the Memphis VAMC Communication Cluster over next 90-

180 days and prepare for roll-out to other inpatient units hospital-wide. With continued focus on training staff

on patient satisfaction tactics. With anticipation of official Survey of Healthcare Experiences of Patients (SHEP)

Scores

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Tennessee Nurses Association

Statements of Financial Position,

December 31, 2018 and 2017

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Tennessee Nurses Association

Statements of Activities and Changes in Net Assets,

For the Year Ended December 31, 2018

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Tennessee Nurses Association

Statements of Activities and Changes in Net Assets (Continued),

For the Year Ended December 31, 2017

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Tennessee Nurses Association

Statements of Cash Flows,

For the Years Ended December 31, 2018 and 2017

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TNA Past Presidents

*Mrs. Lena A. Warner...............................................1905-1918

*Nina E. Wootton........................................................1918-1919

*Myrtle Marion Archer.............................................1920-1921

*Mrs. Daisy Gould......................................................1921-1923

*Mrs. Myrtle E. Blair..................................................1924-1925

*Abbie Roberts..........................................................1926-1927

*Mrs. Corrine B. Hunn.............................................1928-1929

*Hazel Lee Goff........................................................1930-1932

*Nancy Rice (Nashville)..........................................1933-1935

*Aurelia B. Potts (Nashville).................................1936-1937

*Mattie E. Malone (Memphis)...............................1938-1939

*Lennis Ault (Knoxville).........................................1940-1942

*Frances H. Cunningham (Memphis)...............1942-1944

*Beatrice M. Clutch (Nashville)...........................1944-1948

*Ruth Neil Murry (Memphis)................................1948-1950

*Elizabeth H. Killeffer (Cookeville)....................1950-1952

*Violet M. Crook (Union City).............................1952-1955

*Catherine M. Sterling (Memphis)......................1956-1959

*Vesta L. Swartz (Johnson City)........................1960-1961

*Mary Frances Smith (Memphis)........................1962-1966

*Dorothy L. Griscom (Memphis)........................1966-1969

*Dorothy Hocker (Nashville).................................1969-1971

*Mary Evelyn Kemp (Nashville)............................1971-1973

*Erline Gore (Nashville)..........................................1973-1975

*Patsy B. McClure (Knoxville)...............................1975-1977

*Emma Lou Harris (Chattanooga).....................1977-1979

*Mary Windham (Clarksville)................................1979-1981

Annie J. Carter (Nashville).....................................1981-1983

Margaret Heins (Knoxville)...................................1983-1985

Virginia(Ginna)Trotter Betts(Nashville)...........1985-1987

Margaret Heins (Knoxville)...................................1987-1989

Frances Edwards (Nashville)...............................1989-1993

Carol Blankenship (Johnson City)....................1993-1995

Sharon Adkins (Nashville).....................................1995-1997

Margaret (Peggy) Strong (Memphis)...............1997-1999

Gary Crotty (Knoxville).........................................1999-2001

Wanda Neal Hooper (Nashville)......................2001-2003

*Maureen Nalle (Knoxville)................................2003-2005

Susan Sanders (Lynchburg).............................2005-2007

Laura Beth Brown (Nashville)..........................2007-2009

Elizabeth (Beth) H. Smith (Piney Flats).........2009-2011

Lena Patterson (Ooltewah)..................................2011-2012

Jill S. Kinch (Nashville) (Interim President)..........2012-2013

Frances (Billie) Sills (Johnson City).................2013-2015

Sandra (Sandy) Murabito (Nashville)..............2015-2017

*deceased

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Providing A Higher

Degree of Care

A leader in nursing

education at bachelor,

masters and doctoral

levels, and nationally

recognized for its

nurse-managed

health centers, rural

focus, interdisciplinary

programs, and community

partnerships.

Take Your Career to

A Higher Degree

www.etsu.edu/nursing

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2019-2020 TNF Board of Trust and Staff

Staff

Mission Statement - Promoting Professional Excellence in Nursing

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2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

You chose to be a nurse because you care...

join our family of Caring People. Changing Lives. Every Day.

Be an integral part of a dynamic team at Tennessee’s Largest Rehabilitation Hospital

» Competitive Pay/Excellent Benefits/PTO

» 403b Retirement Plan with Match

» Ongoing Educational Opportunities

» Tuition/Scholarship Programs

» Progressive Clinical Programs

» Day & Night Shift Positions: Full Time/Float/PRN

» 12 Hour Shifts

» More Time to Interact with Patients

Contact:

Rosania Burton, HR

rburton@siskinrehab.org

423.634.1268

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TNA 2020

Events

2019 TNA-TSNA JOINT CONFERENCE | NURSES: THE REAL SUPER HEROES

Save the Dates

Nurses Day on the Hill

February 4, 2020

The traditional Legislative

Summit will be changing this

year to Nurses Day on the Hill.

The focus will be on

engaging TNA members and

RNs from across Tennessee in

advocacy on TNA priority

legislation.

TNA Annual Conference

October 30 - November 1, 2020

Franklin Marriott Cool Springs

We’ll see you in 2020!

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DNP

Family Nurse Practitioner

1st year 100% online with 6 days maximum on-campus days per year

Nurse Anesthesia 1st year 100% online

Post-Master's DNP Program 100% online

For more information contact:

Dr. Katy Garth, 270-809-6669 | kgarth@murraystate.edu

Dr. Dina Byers, 270-809-6223 | dbyers@murraystate.edu

murraystate.edu/nursing

Equal education and employment opportunities M/F/D, AA employer

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