New Mexico Nurse - April 2021

emiller

The Official

Publication of

VOLUME 66 • NUMBER 2 APRIL 2021

Advocating for Nursing Practice

Since 1921

Quarterly publication sent to more than 25,850 Registered Nurses and Licensed Practical Nurses in New

Mexico. Provided to New Mexico’s Nursing Community by the New Mexico Nurses Association

A Constituent of the American Nurses Association • (505) 471-3324 • http://www.nmna.org/

Inside

The Nurse Appreciation Effort Continues

Page 3

New Mexico Nurses Association

Announces

Summer 2021 launch of the Nurse Advocacy Fellowship

“Professional Advocacy for Nursing Empowerment”

A Year-long Program

Watch for Announcements calling for Applications for Program Fellows

Legislation of Note During the 2021

New Mexico Legislative Session

Page 6

• Core Concepts introduced in an Interactive Classroom Setting with Experts in the Field

• Develop Critical Strategies for Professional Initiatives alongside Nurse Leaders

• In-depth Hands-on Experience at the Legislature in Advocacy for the Professional

• Results in a Fellowship Recognition and On-going Leadership Opportunities

• Participate in the Inaugural Graduating Class

• Substantial Continuing Education Credits

The Nurse Within: Peer-Based Support

Group Meeting for Nurses

Supporting Nurses

Page 11

current resident or

Presort Standard

US Postage

PAID

Permit #14

Princeton, MN

55371

The Building Blocks of Advocacy

Beyond exceptional advocacy for patients, how do nurses

advocate for the profession and better health care?

Sheena Ferguson MSN, RN, ANAI Fellow

Nurses understand their professional duty to

advocate for their patients. We excel at this role.

We are lauded each year in the Gallup survey

where we continue to be ranked by the public

as the most trusted professional for honesty and

ethics. Since 1999 when nurses were added to

the poll, with the exception of 2001 and 9/11,

nurses have topped Gallup's Honesty and Ethics

list for 19 consecutive years. Certainly, due to

our extraordinary care during the pandemic,

nurses have become more visible and recognized

for their patient advocacy. In 2021, nurses

have seen the percentage increase with nurses

receiving a high or very high trust rating of

89%. This relationship with patients, and the

bond we share, is considered “downstream advocacy.”

The nurse directs advocacy efforts to a patient, which

can mean an individual, a family, a neighborhood, or a

community.

There are many examples of this, and the reader

can also provide many examples of nursing efforts to

advocate for patients. Here are a few of many that I

witnessed first-hand:

• A nurse who takes a pet home when a homeless

person gets admitted, recognizing that this pet is

the only family a patient may have;

• A nurse who has a patient repeatedly admitted

for DKA because they cannot afford insulin, and

works to get the patient’s insulin covered;

The Building Blocks of Advocacy continued on page 4


Page 2 • The New Mexico Nurse April, May, June 2021

ARE YOU LICENSED TO

PRACTICE IN NEW MEXICO?

The New Mexico Nurses Association invites you to join us

today...

And help determine the impact of health care policy on

nursing practice...

Just because you are receiving this newsletter, it does not

mean you are a member of NMNA.

See page 15 for ANA/New Mexico Membership Application

and join today!

The New Mexico Nurse is published quarterly every January,

April, July and October by the Arthur L. Davis Publishing

Agency, Inc. for the New Mexico Nurses Association, a

constituent member of the American Nurses Association.

For advertising rates and information, please contact

Arthur L. Davis Publishing Agency, Inc., PO Box 216,

Cedar Falls, Iowa 50613, (800) 626-4081, sales@aldpub.

com. NMNA and the Arthur L. Davis Publishing Agency,

Inc. reserve the right to reject any advertisement.

Responsibility for errors in advertising is limited to

corrections in the next issue or refund of price of

advertisement.

Acceptance of advertising does not imply endorsement

or approval by the New Mexico Nurses Association

of products advertised, the advertisers, or the claims

made. Rejection of an advertisement does not imply a

product offered for advertising is without merit, or that

the manufacturer lacks integrity, or that this association

disapproves of the product or its use. NMNA and the

Arthur L. Davis Publishing Agency, Inc. shall not be held

liable for any consequences resulting from purchase or

use of an advertiser’s product. Articles appearing in this

publication express the opinions of the authors; they do not

necessarily reflect views of the staff, board, or membership

of NMNA or those of the national or local associations.

New Mexico Nurse is a juried nursing publication for

nurses licensed in New Mexico. The Editorial Board

reviews articles submitted for publication and articles for

consideration should be submitted to dwalker@nmna.org.

Visit www.JoinANA.org

for complete information.

NMNA Board, Committee Chairs and Staff

President: Gloria Doherty, PhDc, MSN,

Adult Health Nurse Specialist, ACNP-BC

Vice President: Michael Shannon, MSN, BSN

Treasurer: Barbara Salas CNP

Secretary: Lisa Leiding, DNP, MSN, RN

Camille Adair, RN

Directors:

Keith Carlson, RN, BSN, NC-BC

Rachel Frija DNP, SN, RN-BC

Siri GuruNam Khalsa MSN, RN

I finally found a

nursing career that is

great for me and my

family!

Judy Liesveld BSN, MS, PhD

Lisa Marie Turk MSN, RN

Mario Valencia MBA, MSN, RN

Committees:

Government Relations Committee

Christine De Lucas , DNP, MPH, RN

Guest Editor Deborah Walker, MSN, RN

NMNA Website: www.nmna.org

Office Mailing Address: P.O. Box 418, Santa Fe, NM 87504

Office Phone: 505-471-3324

Be a nurse who helps create a healthier New Mexico!

Apply today!

Public Health:

Heather Black, 505-827-2308, heather.black@state.nm.us

In-Patient Facilities:

Heather Black, 505-827-2308, heather.black@state.nm.us

Developmental Disabilities Division:

Elizabeth Finley, 505-841-2907

Division of Health Improvement:

Stephanie Metarelis, 505-476-9033

Epidemiology and Response Division:

Liana Lujan, 505-476-8220

We offer a

competitive salary

and benefits

package, and one

of the best public

retirement plans in

the nation.

An Accredited Health

Department by the

Public Health

Accreditation Board

since 2015

For more information go to: http://www.spo.state.nm.us/

Executive Director: Deborah Walker, MSN, RN

PO Box 418 Santa Fe, NM 87504

Office: 505-471-3324 Cell: 505-660-3890

Continuing Education Coordinator:

Suzanne Canfield, MBA, BSN, RN

ceapps@mnna.org 505-690-6975

Peer Reviewers:

Phyllis Chester, DNP, MS, BC-FNP, RN

Becky Gonzales, MSN, RN, BC/BS

Susan Jurica, MSN, BSN, RN

Cynthia Nuttall, PhD, RN, NE-BC

Claudia Phillips, MSN-Ed, RN

Barbara Shortt, BSN, RN

www.nmna.org

Published by:

Arthur L. Davis

Publishing Agency, Inc.


April, May, June 2021 The New Mexico Nurse • Page 3

The Nurse Appreciation Effort Continues

Most recently nurses at Christus St. Vincent, Presbyterian Santa Fe and Espanola,

Lovelace Heart and the main Lovelace Hospital in Albuquerque were recognized by

their nursing community through the effort.

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Page 4 • The New Mexico Nurse April, May, June 2021

The Building Blocks of Advocacy continued from page 1

• A nurse who helps intervene for a patient who

has multiple run-ins with law enforcement, and

he creates a care plan for this patient and shares

with the near-by station;

• A nurse practitioner in rural NM who cannot

dispense in her town that is without a pharmacy

and struggles with a pharmacy 57 miles away in

another town to get medications to her patient.

For each of these examples, there are often similar

stories of nurses throughout New Mexico trying to

accomplish the same things, right? What if nurses

could address these issues by advocating for change at

a state-wide level. Wouldn’t that impact more patients,

and assist more nurses who are all struggling to make

health care better? Easier? Patient-centric?

This type of advocacy is called “upstream advocacy”

in that it filters down or impacts many situations; and

ultimately shapes public policy.

Upstream advocacy is changing practice barriers

with legislation or practice rules that let nurses do

better for their clients by correcting problems before

they reach the client, including changes that make

them better as well for the nurse. How would you fix

these four problems presented?

Opportunities in Bernalillo, Deming, Gallup,

Las Vegas, Los Lunas, Roswell and Taos!

• A nurse who takes a pet home when a homeless

person gets admitted, recognizing that this pet is

the only family a patient may have, and becomes

the juggernaut that creates a policy to correct this

situation for other patients in the same situation

in other hospitals. She starts talking to other

nurses in her specialty association and they begin

working with shelters who will tag the animal as

the owner is known but in a special situation;

• A nurse who has a patient repeatedly admitted

for DKA because they cannot afford insulin,

and lobbies government to facilitate insurance

companies to change what is covered and results

in an inexpensive medication being covered;

• A nurse who intervenes for a patient who has

multiple run-ins with law enforcement and helps

educate law enforcement on intervening with

behavioral health patients to better understand

de-escalation techniques. This education reduces

trauma for the law enforcement team who suffers

when a situation gets out of control;

• A nurse practitioner in rural NM who cannot

dispense in her town that is without a pharmacy

and struggles with a pharmacy 57 miles away

in another town to get medications to her

patient, decides there must be a better way, and

goes to her state Senator and Representative

to bring forward legislative changes that can

benefit practitioners and patients in other towns

across New Mexico who struggle with the same

problem.

The American Nurses Association (ANA) believes

that advocacy is a pillar of nursing. Nurses instinctively

advocate for their patients in their workplace and

in their communities, but legislative and political

advocacy is no less important” (ANA, 2021).

We know from several recent studies that nurses

are extremely skilled at problem-solving and using

innovative thinking to make care better for their

patients. However, too many of us lack the basic skills

to effectively bring about necessary improvements to

health care. Nurses can often be heard to say “I am not

political; I just want to take care of my patients.” At the

same time, we complain that nothing ever changes,

and things do not improve. And the truth is that the

power, knowledge, and expertise is within our grasp to

make vast improvements.

- How does our profession build professional

political advocacy skills?

- Is there adequate exposure in our educational

programs?

- How can we work together to attain the critical

knowledge and experience?

For the last four decades, the New Mexico Nurses

Association has had legislative action programs for

students and for licensed nurses (now branded as

NMNA’s Capitol Challenge). What we have not had is

sufficient numbers of educated advocates to speak

with a concerted voice of the science that creates a

focused and consistent message on professional issues.

An example? We can provide many!

• Independent practice for certified nurse midwives

consistent with our education and training.

• Recognition of clinical nurse specialists as

advanced practice nurses.

• Conscious sedation provided by educated and

experienced registered nurses.

• Shaken Baby Education Prevention legislation to

combat one of the nation’s highest injury rates.

• Safe Harbor legislation, the second state in the

nation to have such a program.

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April, May, June 2021 The New Mexico Nurse • Page 5

Do you have a practice issue that you believe is a

statewide issue that would benefit your profession

and your patients’ health care outcomes? Consider the

New Mexico Nurses Association fellowship program

in professional advocacy. Learn how professional

advocacy works. Learn how you can be a part of it!

• Be informed and participate in your nurses’

association & specialty organizations.

• Every year there are state and national calls for

action, bring those concerns forward!

• Volunteer to help, get in the game. Identify an

intervention that corrects a problem.

Here is an example of proposed legislation that

would have been catastrophic for our patients.

Our colleagues, the Ultrasonographers, reside

in the department of environmental safety, not in

the department of health. Because of this, a bill

was introduced several years ago that was almost

overlooked by our nurses association. Basically, and

this is simplified for space and your reading time,

the bill proposed to our legislators that patients

were being injured, burned, by nurses using ionized

radiation. Nurses use non-ionizing radiation in the

form of ultrasound: bladder scanners, PICC line and IV

insertion, pulse oximetry, doppler, and the advanced

practice nurses use ultrasound in F.A.S.T. exams and

for fetal assessments, as two examples. Now, we

do love our ultrasonographers, and at the time the

legislation was proposed, there were about 20,000

nurses, and 450 sonographers in our great state. And

while there are not enough Ultrasonographers to

cover 24/7/365; there also was not a patient safety

or quality issue to require the change anyway. Our

nursing advocate team went to work; we calculated

in one of the large hospitals there were probably

around 5,000 interventions a day that were required

to use ultrasound technology but did not require an

ultrasonographer. Nurses across New Mexico said,

“this cannot be allowed to stand.” No one wanted to

go back to I & O catheterizations, multiple unnecessary

“sticks” for our patients, and well, you can see where

this was going. Our association asked us to call our

legislators and educate them about what was at stake

for their constituents. We packed the chamber during

hearings, we gave powerful testimony, and we stated

what was at risk if the ultrasound bill proceeded.

The bill was tabled until the ultrasonographers

and nurses sat down and negotiated and worked on

a bill that would not harm patients or impede care.

That happened because nurses were engaged and

advocated for our profession and our patients. It was a

prime example of negotiation ...for patients, for nursing

practice.

What can you do to become active as an advocate?

What are you doing now?

At a minimum, this is how we make a difference….

• If you can call a legislator?

• If you can write a letter?

• If you can help, the time is now.

• Email the New Mexico Nurses Association at

dwalker@nmna.org or me: nmsionnagh@gmail.

com

• We have a fellowship program starting late Spring

2021: Apply!!!!

• An entire course over one year:

- Classroom activities

- Strategy and planning calls

- Hands-on practicum

- Extended legislative experience

- Practical application

- Certificate and Recognition

Join us, help determine what else can we accomplish

together !!!!!

Selected references:

https://dailynurse.com/gallup-2020-america-trusts-themost-trusted-profession-more-than-ever

https://www.nursingworld.org)

CCNE Accredited BSN Programs

• Pre-Licensure BSN

• Fully-Online RN-to-BSN

New Programs in Graduate Nursing

• Fully-Online MSN

• Post-MSN FNP Certificate Program (Summer 2021)

Western New Mexico University

School of Nursing

sonak.wnmu.edu

575-538-6960

nursing@wnmu.edu


Page 6 • The New Mexico Nurse April, May, June 2021

Legislation of Note During the 2021 Legislative Session

Contact the NMNA Office for Final Outcomes

New Mexico Legislators became adept at bill

introduction, committee hearings, testimony from

expert witnesses and the public, and floor session.....

VIRTUALLY !! Yet another challenge presented by the

pandemic.

Our lobbyist, Linda Siegle, has worked harder than

any other year given the challenges of lobbying virtually

and by text!!! It has not been uncommon that she has

three different computers on at the same time to cover

multiple hearings and to be able to zoom in and out to

provide testimony and comment on our bills of interest.

And of course, prcoedures in committees for the

House and Senate were different. Below are the bills of

interest to NMNA during the session. Please contact

NMNA for final outcomes as the New Mexico Nurse

goes to print before the end of the Session,

Bill:

Sponsors:

Title:

Summary:

Subjects:

Related:

Progress:

Status:

HB7

Cadena (D33); Egolf (D47); Ferrary

(D37); Armstrong, D. (D17); Louis (D26)

DECRIMINALIZE ABORTION

(Duplicate of 2021 SB10; identical

to 2019 HB51, 2018 HB16 and 2017

HB473) Repeals sections of the

Criminal Code that criminalize and

provide penalties for performing

abortions.

Health and Medical Practice;

Criminal Code; Family and Juveniles;

Constitutional Issues and Amendments;

Civil Rights

2021:SB10

1st House: Reported from Committees

02/02/2021 – House Calendar

History:

01/25/2021—H Introduced and

referred to House Health & Human

Services.

01/25/2021—H Also referred to House

Judiciary.

01/28/2021—H Reported Do Pass by

House Health & Human Services.

02/02/2021—H Reported Do Pass by

House Judiciary.

Scheduled: 02/16/2021—House Calendar, 11:00

a.m., Virtual

Bill:

Sponsors:

Title:

Summary:

Subjects:

Related:

Progress:

Status:

History:

HB13

Barreras (I12)

EMERGENCY MEDICAL ASSISTANCE

FOR NONCITIZENS

(Related to 2021 HB112) Requires

emergency medical assistance to be

made available to noncitizens who

meet Medicaid eligibility requirements

but whose immigration status does not

qualify them for Medicaid. Amends the

Public Assistance Act.

Health and Medical Practice; Human

Services; Family and Juveniles

2021:HB112

1st House: Reported from Committees

02/11/2021 – House Calendar

01/25/2021—H Introduced and referred

to House Health & Human Services.

01/25/2021—H Also referred to House

State Government, Elections & Indian

Affairs.

Bill:

Sponsors:

Title:

Summary:

Subjects:

Progress:

Status:

02/02/2021—H Reported Do Pass by

House Health & Human Services.

02/11/2021—H Referral withdrawn from

House State Government, Elections &

Indian Affairs.

02/11/2021—H Referred to House

Appropriations & Finance.

02/11/2021—H Reported Do Pass as

amended by House State Government,

Elections & Indian Affairs.

HB24

Sarinana (D21)

SCHOOL DISTRICT FULL TIME NURSE

REQUIRED

(For the Legislative Education Study

Committee) (Related to 2020 HB321

and SB132; 2019 SB31) Requires each

school district to employ at least one

full time nurse each school year unless

it is a rural district to which Public

Education Department (PED) grants

a waiver; sets waiver requirements;

requires PED to promulgate rules;

conditions PED approval of district

operating budget on meeting the

requirement in its educational plan.

Schools and Teachers; State Affairs and

State Agencies; Interim Studies and

Interim Committees; Public Finance

and Budgets

1st House: Referred to Committee

02/02/2021 – House Education

Committee


April, May, June 2021 The New Mexico Nurse • Page 7

History:

Bill:

Sponsors:

Title:

Summary:

Subjects:

Progress:

01/04/2021—H Prefiled in the House.

01/19/2021—H Introduced and

referred to House Education.

01/19/2021—H Also referred to House

Health & Human Services.

02/02/2021—H Referral withdrawn

from House Health & Human Services.

02/02/2021—H Referred to House

Appropriations & Finance.

HB32

Sarinana (D21)

FULL TIME NURSE REQUIRED IN EVERY

SCHOOL

Related to HB24 for the LESC, which

applies to school districts; 2020 HB321

and SB132; 2019 SB31)

Amends the Public School Code and

the Charter School Law to require each

school to employ at least one full time

nurse each school year, unless it is a

rural school to which Public Education

Department (PED) grants a waiver; sets

waiver requirements; requires PED to

promulgate rules. PED may not approve

the operating budget of a charter

school that does not provide for a full

time nurse nor have a PED waiver.

Appropriates $5.0 million (GF) to PED

for FY2022 to assist schools with hiring

school nurses

Schools and Teachers; State Affairs and

State Agencies; Appropriations; Interim

Studies and Interim Committees; Public

Finance and Budgets

1st House: Referred to Committee

Status:

History:

Bill:

Sponsors:

Title:

Summary:

Subjects:

Progress:

Status:

History:

02/02/2021 – House Education

Committee

01/04/2021—H Prefiled in the House.

01/19/2021—H Introduced and referred

to House Education.

01/19/2021—H Also referred to House

Health & Human Services.

02/02/2021—H Referral withdrawn

from House Health & Human Services.

02/02/2021—H Referred to House

Appropriations & Finance.

HB35

Matthews (D27); Sweetser (D32); Dow

(R38)

INDEPENDENT ROLE FOR NURSE

ANESTHETISTS

(For the Legislative Health and Human

Services Committee) Broadens the

scope of practice of a certified

registered nurse anesthetist to

authorize functioning in either an

independent role or in collaboration

with other health care providers (in

accordance with the policies of a health

care facility).

Health and Medical Practice; Labor

1st House: Passed

02/12/2021 – Passed in the House

01/05/2021—H Prefiled in the House.

01/19/2021—H Introduced and referred

to House Health & Human Services.

01/19/2021—H Also referred to House

State Government, Elections & Indian

Affairs.

Bill:

Sponsors:

Title:

Summary:

01/28/2021—H Reported Do Pass by

House Health & Human Services.

02/09/2021—H Reported Do Pass by

House State Government, Elections &

Indian Affairs.

02/12/2021—H Opened for floor

debate.

02/12/2021—H Passed 69 0.

HB47

Armstrong, D. (D17); Hochman Vigil

(D15); Stefanics (D39); O'Neill (D13)

ELIZABETH WHITEFIELD END OF LIFE

OPTIONS ACT

(Substantially the same as 2019 HB90

and SB153; related to 2017 HB171 and

SB252) Cited as the Elizabeth Whitefield

End of Life Options Act, House Bill 47

would provide terminally ill adults who

are mentally competent the option of

having medical assistance in bringing

about their own death. Under current

law, it is illegal for a health care provider

to write a prescription for a patient to

end life. Establishes rights, procedures

and protections related to medical aid

in dying. Removes criminal liability for

attending health care providers who

provide assistance. The act is not to

be construed as authorization for a

physician or other person to end a life

by lethal injection, mercy killing, or

euthanasia. Actions taken in accordance

with provisions of the act shall not be

construed to constitute suicide, assisted

suicide, euthanasia, mercy killing,

homicide, or adult abuse.

Legislation of Note During the...continued on page 8

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Page 8 • The New Mexico Nurse April, May, June 2021

Legislation of Note During the...continued from page 7

Subjects:

Related:

Progress:

Status:

History:

Bill:

Sponsors:

Title:

Summary:

Subjects:

Progress:

Status:

History:

Bill:

Sponsors:

Title:

Summary:

Aging; Civil Rights; Courts and Civil

Matters; Criminal Code; Health and

Medical Practice; Human Services;

Insurance

2019:HB90; 2019:SB153; 2017:HB171;

2017:SB252

1st House: Reported from Committees

02/16/2021 – House Calendar

01/07/2021—H Prefiled in the House.

01/19/2021—H Introduced and referred

to House Health & Human Services.

01/19/2021—H Also referred to House

Judiciary.

02/09/2021—H Reported Do Pass as

amended by House Health & Human

Services.

02/16/2021—H Reported Do Pass as

amended by House Judiciary.

HB104

Allison (D4)

EXPAND RURAL HEALTH CARE

PRACTITIONER TAX CREDIT

(Related to 2020 HB270 and HB275)

Expands the Rural Health Care

Practitioner Tax Credit of up to $3,000

to all licensed midwives and registered

nurses and to essential health care

workers who provided assistance

to other health care professionals

during the coronavirus pandemic.

Defines “essential health infrastructure

operations, including custodial and

security staff.

Health and Medical Practice; Taxation,

Fees and Audits

1st House: Reported from Committees

02/02/2021 – House Taxation and

Revenue Committee

01/15/2021—H Prefiled in the House.

01/19/2021—H Introduced and referred

to House Health & Human Services.

01/19/2021—H Also referred to House

Taxation & Revenue.

02/02/2021—H Reported Do Pass by

House Health & Human Services.

HB123

Armstrong, D. (D17)

OVERDOSE PREVENTION PROGRAMS

AND LIMITED IMMUNITY

(Related to 2019 SB282) Authorizes

counties and municipalities to establish

by ordinance overdose prevention

programs and provides limited

immunity for persons who provide

services for or use approved overdose

prevention programs.

Subjects:

Related:

Progress:

Status:

History:

Scheduled:

Bill:

Sponsors:

Title:

Summary:

Subjects:

Related:

Progress:

Status:

History:

Bill:

Sponsors:

Title:

Summary:

Subjects:

Progress:

Status:

History:

Bill:

Sponsors:

Title:

Health and Medical Practice; Human

Services; Criminal Code; Public Safety

and Corrections; Municipalities/City

Government; County Affairs; State

Affairs and State Agencies

2019:SB282

1st House: Reported from Committees

02/04/2021 – House Judiciary

Committee

01/19/2021—H Introduced and

referred to House Health & Human

Services.

01/19/2021—H Also referred to House

Judiciary.

02/04/2021—H Reported Do Pass by

House Health & Human Services.

02/17/2021—House Judiciary

Committee, 1:30 p.m., Virtual

HB220

Herrera (D41)

HEALTH CARE FACILITIES CONTRACT

DEFINITION

(Duplicate of 2021 SB179; related

to 2021 HB240) Allows issuance of

bonds for county skilled nursing and

rehabilitation hospitals; proposes

the enactment of the 2021 Public

Securities Validation Act and changes

the definition of “health care facilities

contract in the Hospital Funding

Act. Proclaims that the validation act

shall supply such legislative authority

as necessary to validate any public

securities issued or acts taken when

the securities were issued.

Public Finance and Budgets; Health

and Medical Practice; County Affairs

2021:SB179; 2021:HB240

1st House: Referred to Committee

02/02/2021 – House Health and

Human Services Committee

02/02/2021—H Introduced and

referred to House Health & Human

Services.

02/02/2021—H Also referred to House

Judiciary.

HB269

Cook (R56)

DISCLOSURE OF MEDICAL RECORDS

Authorizes disclosure by a provider,

health care institution, health

information exchange or health care

group purchases, of an individual’s

electronic medical records to a provider,

health care institution, or health

care group purchaser for treatment,

payment, or health care operation

activities provided the disclosure follows

federal HIPAA regulations and 42

USC Sec. 290dd d (Confidentiality of

records).

Health and Medical Practice; Insurance

1st House: Referred to Committee

02/09/2021 – House Health and Human

Services Committee

02/09/2021—H Introduced and referred

to House Health & Human Services.

02/09/2021—H Also referred to House

Judiciary.

SB31

Stefanics (D39)

FULL TIME NURSE REQUIRED IN EVERY

SCHOOL DISTRICT

Summary:

Subjects:

Related:

Progress:

Status:

History:

Bill:

Sponsors:

Title:

Summary:

Subjects:

Progress:

Status:

History:

Bill:

Sponsors:

Title:

Summary:

Subjects:

Related:

Progress:

Status:

History:

Bill:

Sponsors:

Title:

(Duplicate of 2021 HB24; related to

2021 HB32; 2020 HB321 and SB132;

2019 SB31) Requires each school

district to employ at least one full time

nurse each school year unless it is a

rural district to which Public Education

Department (PED) grants a waiver; sets

waiver requirements; requires PED to

educational plan.

Schools and Teachers; State Affairs and

State Agencies; Interim Studies and

Interim Committees; Public Finance and

Budgets

2021:HB24; 2021:HB32; 2020:HB321;

2020:SB132; 2019:SB31

1st House: Reported from Committees

02/01/2021 – Senate Finance

Committee

01/19/2021—S Introduced and referred

to Senate Education.

01/19/2021—S Also referred to Senate

Finance.

02/01/2021—S Reported Do Pass as

amended by Senate Education.

SB46

Padilla (D14)

NURSES DISPENSING METHADONE

Authorizes a registered or licensed

practical nurse employed by a DOH

approved opioid treatment program to

dispense a maximum 27 day supply of

methadone for take home purposes to

a client of the program.

Health and Medical Practice

1st House: Reported from Committees

02/01/2021 – Senate Judiciary

Committee

01/19/2021—S Introduced and referred

to Senate Health and Public Affairs.

01/19/2021—S Also referred to Senate

Judiciary.

02/01/2021—S Reported Do Pass by

Senate Health and Public Affairs.

SB61

Ortiz y Pino (D12)

RURAL PRIMARY CARE CLINICIAN

LOAN REPAYMENT ACT

(For the Legislative Health and Human

Services Committee) (Similar to 2019

SB133) Cited as the Rural Primary

Care Clinician Loan Repayment Act,

provides a program, administered by

the Department of Health, to award

funds to eligible organizations to repay

the loans of eligible clinicians who

agree to provide health care services in

underserved areas.

Health and Medical Practice; Human

Services; Appropriations

2019:SB133

1st House: Reported from Committees

02/01/2021 – Senate Finance

Committee

01/19/2021—S Introduced and referred

to Senate Indian, Rural & Cultural

Affairs.

01/19/2021—S Also referred to Senate

Finance.

02/01/2021—S Reported Do Pass as

amended by Senate Indian, Rural &

Cultural Affairs.

SB184

Stefanics (D39); Ferrary (D37)

CONGENITAL SYPHILIS TESTING


April, May, June 2021 The New Mexico Nurse • Page 9

Summary:

Subjects:

Progress:

Status:

History:

Bill:

Sponsors:

Title:

Summary:

Subjects:

Related:

Progress:

Status:

History:

Bill:

Sponsors:

Title:

Requires physicians to test pregnant

women for syphilis during pregnancy

and at delivery pursuant to federal CDC

testing guidelines.

Health and Medical Practice; Family and

Juveniles

1st House: Referred to Committee

02/01/2021 – Senate Health and Public

Affairs Committee

02/01/2021—S Introduced and referred

to Senate Health and Public Affairs.

02/01/2021—S Also referred to Senate

Judiciary.

SB201

Padilla (D14)

INDEPENDENT ROLE FOR CERTIFIED

REGISTERED NURSE ANESTHETISTS

(Duplicate of 2021 HB35) Broadens

the scope of practice of a certified

registered nurse anesthetist to authorize

functioning in either an independent

role or in collaboration with other health

care providers (in accordance with the

policies of a health care facility).

Health and Medical Practice; Labor

2021:HB35

1st House: Referred to Committee

02/01/2021 – Senate Health and Public

Affairs Committee

02/01/2021—S Introduced and referred

to Senate Health and Public Affairs.

02/01/2021—S Also referred to Senate

Judiciary.

SB239

Stefanics (D39)

MEDICAL MALPRACTICE ACT

CHANGES

Summary: (Related to 2021 HB75 and 2019

HB629) Amends the definition of

“health care provider” and “malpractice

claim” in the Medical Malpractice

Act, raises recoverable limits, prohibits

disclosure of certain confidential

information; creates a Medical

Malpractice Act Advisory Committee.

Subjects:

Related:

Progress:

Status:

History:

Bill:

Sponsors:

Title:

Summary:

Subjects:

Progress:

Status:

History:

Bill:

Sponsors:

Title:

Summary:

Subjects:

Progress:

Status:

History:

Health and Medical Practice; Human

Services; Insurance

2021:HB75; 2021:HB629

1st House: Referred to Committee

02/01/2021 – Senate Health and Public

Affairs Committee

02/01/2021—S Introduced and referred

to Senate Health and Public Affairs.

02/01/2021—S Also referred to Senate

Judiciary.

SB244

Hickey (D20)

EXEMPTION FROM CHILD

IMMUNIZATION

Authorizes a certified nurse practitioner

to prepare a certificate stating that the

physical condition of a child is such that

immunization would seriously endanger

the life or health of the child. Currently

only a duly licensed physician can

prepare such a certificate.

Family and Juveniles; Health and

Medical Practice

1st House: Referred to Committee

02/01/2021 – Senate Health and Public

Affairs Committee

02/01/2021—S Introduced and referred

to Senate Health and Public Affairs.

02/01/2021—S Also referred to Senate

Judiciary.

SB282

Hickey (D20)

ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD

DISCLOSURE

Allows disclosures of medical records

for treatment, payment, and other

activities.

Health and Medical Practice; Insurance;

Information Technology

1st House: Referred to Committee

02/01/2021 – Senate Health and Public

Affairs Committee

02/01/2021—S Introduced and referred

to Senate Health and Public Affairs.

Bill:

Sponsors:

Title:

Summary:

Subjects:

Related:

Progress:

Status:

History:

02/01/2021—S Also referred to Senate

Judiciary.

SB308

Stefanics (D39); Hamblen (D38); O'Neill

(D13)

ELIZABETH WHITEFIELD END OF LIFE

OPTIONS ACT

(Duplicate of 2021 HB47; substantially

the same as 2019 HB90 and SB153;

related to 2017 HB171 and SB252)

Cited as the Elizabeth Whitefield End

of Life Options Act, House Bill 47

would provide terminally ill adults who

are mentally competent the option of

having medical assistance in bringing

about their own death. Under current

law, it is illegal for a health care provider

to write a prescription for a patient to

end life. Establishes rights, procedures

and protections related to medical aid

in dying. Removes criminal liability for

attending health care providers who

provide assistance. The act is not to

be construed as authorization for a

physician or other person to end a life

by lethal injection, mercy killing, or

euthanasia. Actions taken in accordance

with provisions of the act shall not be

construed to constitute suicide, assisted

suicide, euthanasia, mercy killing,

homicide, or adult abuse.

Health and Medical Practice; Human

Services; Criminal Code

2021:HB47; 2019:HB90; 2019:SB153;

2017:HB171; 2017:SB252

1st House: Referred to Committee

02/01/2021 – Senate Health and Public

Affairs Committee

02/01/2021—S Introduced and referred

to Senate Health and Public Affairs.

02/01/2021—S Also referred to Senate

Judiciary.

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Page 10 • The New Mexico Nurse April, May, June 2021

Nursing Professional Development: Lifelong Learning

Suzanne J. Canfield, MBA, BSN, RN, NPD-BC

NMNA Accredited Approver Program Director

Nursing Professional Development (NPD) has evolved

into its own recognized nursing specialty. One essential

element of nursing professional development is the

continuing education of licensed professional RN’s.

The American Nurses Credentialing Center’s (ANCC)

accreditation and approval processes identified in

the 2015 Primary Accreditation Approver Application

Manual (1st ed.) and Harper, M.G, & Maloney, P.

(2016) set the bar for quality nursing professional

development. The words, nursing professional

development, infer further development of the

nurse who is already a licensed professional. Nursing

professional development includes both post-license

academic education and continued nursing education

provided to RN’s in practice. NPD practitioners, as

mentors, leaders and learning facilitators, support

organizations as well as RN’s professional growth

in both arenas. Shinners and Graebe (2020) stated,

“Although the individual nurse is responsible for their

educational choices, the NPD practitioner provides

guidance to meet both professional and organizational

goals.”

Academic pre-licensure nursing education involves

the theoretical and practical training to prepare

students for their roles as nursing professionals. The

courses direct nursing students to independent status

as registered nurses. Both pre-license nursing education

and nursing professional development involve thinking

critically, communicating accurately, and performing

nursing interventions in a caring and ethical manner.

However, pre-licensure education is focused on

teaching and learning the basics of professional

nursing, as well as health and illness concepts. (see NM

Nursing Education Consortium on-line model below.)

The academics are focused on introducing nursing

students to the standards of professional nursing care,

as the specific goals and objectives related to those

standards are conveyed. The learning needs have been

pre-determined by those standards which must be well

understood to become licensed.

Nursing continuing professional development builds

upon professional licensed nurses’ education and

experience. This phrase is often used interchangeably

with continuing nursing education (CNE), which

continues to evolve. Nursing professional development

has a systems model (See model below) (Harper

and Maloney, p.10) which is based upon inputs,

throughputs and outputs.

Rather than being pre-determined, nursing professional

development is initiated by:

Assessing nurses’ learning needs based upon

evidence

Performing gap analyses

Planning activities that use adult learning and

specific design principles

Evaluating the learning outcomes of participants

Completing summary evaluations of activities by

NPD practitioners/Nurse Planners.

Evidence-based practice grounded in current

research is at the core of all NPD. Nursing Continuing

Professional Development that is approved to award

credit hours by ANCC/NMNA must include these

components.

To meet the American Nurses Credentialing

Center’s concepts, as presented in the 2015 Primary

Accreditation Approver Application Manual (1st ed.)

for awarding contact hours for nursing continuing

professional development, the NPD Practitioner/Nurse

Planner should begin with these questions:

(Reprinted with permission from New Mexico Nursing Education Consortium.)

800.559.2243 chomecare.com

(Reprinted with permission from Association for Nursing Professional Development.)


April, May, June 2021 The New Mexico Nurse • Page 11

“Why plan this activity here and now?

“What is the issue and what evidence points to this

issue?”

“Is the issue educational, or is it administrative or

behavioral?”

If the issue is educational, the next questions are:

“What are the nurses’ current states, which may

vary, in relation to the identified issue?”

“What are the desired states to be achieved by this

activity?”

“What are the gaps between those states -

knowledge, skill or practice?”

“Will this activity build upon nurses’ knowledge and

experience?

Once these are identified, planning the activity should

begin. The questions are:

“Who is the target audience?”

“Who are the stakeholders that should plan the

activity?”

“What evidence-based research and which experts

can provide the content for this activity?”

“Using Adult Learning Principles, what are the best

active learning strategies that are appropriate for this

audience?”

“What are the participants’ Learning Outcomes

of this activity and how will those outcomes be

measured immediately at the end of the activity?”

Finally, the last questions are:

“Were the Learning Outcomes met for the

participants?”

“How will the feedback from the participants be

evaluated?”

“What would be changed if the activity is offered

again?”

Once the NPD Practitioner/Nurse Planner has

responded to these questions, he/she is following

the process to meet ANCC/NMNA criteria to award

Nursing Continuing Professional Development (NCPD)

contact hours. Although there may be some crossover,

these questions are based on learning needs of the

practicing professional nurse which differ from the prelicensure

nursing students’ foundational education.

All educational activities are not appropriate for

awarding ANCC/NMNA approved contact hours. For

example, training by a commercial interest’s employee

to use a new device or supply involves a conflict of

interest. Breakfast, lunch and breaks may not be

counted in contact hour calculations unless the speaker

presents topics for nursing professional development

or improving patient outcomes, and the content is not

related to a commercial interest entity. Introductions

and welcomes by guests during orientation cannot be

calculated into NCPD contact hours. Any educational

activities that do not follow the ANCC/NMNA

processes nor provide the key information required

cannot be approved. What is important to note is

that the quality of the activities and our approvals are

grounded in applicants using and documenting these

processes. The template forms are only the mechanism

to validate that our processes have been used from the

onset of planning.

As stated by Graebe and Dickerson (2021),

There has never been a more important time

for evidence-based, quality nursing professional

development that improves professional practice

and patient outcomes. The focus of the American

Nurses Credentialing Center’s Accreditation in

NCPD criteria is on developing education to address

identified gaps in knowledge, skill and/or practice,

maintain content integrity, and analyzing measurable

outcomes to demonstrate closure or narrowing of

the gaps that created the need for the education.

Accreditation in NCPD is not about nurses earning

contact hours! The contact hour is the “currency”

that is awarded when learners complete NCPD

activities, but receiving the credit is of little value

if it does not contribute the practice of the nurse,

achievement of improvements in their work, and/or

the outcomes that support the strategic initiatives

of the organization. Accreditation in NCPD is about

ensuring that the learning experiences of nurse

learners is outcome driven.

For information and links to participate contact: Camille@CamilleAdair.com

Nursing Professional Development...continued on page 15


Page 12 • The New Mexico Nurse April, May, June 2021

Are We There Yet? Coping During COVID

Janet McMillan, DSN, APRN, PMHNP-BC

Reprinted with permission from Mississippi RN

September 2020

COVID-19 is an emergency situation that is

unprecedented in our country. While many people feel

the effects of disasters such as 911, Hurricane Katrina,

the California wildfires, earthquakes in the west,

and other regional emergencies, this is the first time

the entire country has been directly affected by any

emergency situation at the same time. Fear and anxiety

can be overwhelming and affect people in different

ways. It can be stressful for both adults and children

and it is particularly important that we understand

that our reactions as healthcare providers to this

event can affect everyone around us. The fear of the

unknown is great. And there are a lot of unanswered

questions during this unprecedented time; however, it

is important for you to take care of your mental health

during a disaster such as this pandemic.

Everyone responds to stress in different ways. The

most important underlying theme during an event

such as this is to maintain as much a normal routine

as possible. The purpose of this article is to provide

information so that you will be able to identify ways to

assist you and your family to maintain some degree of

normalcy in your lives, and offer you resources to help

continue to maintain a healthy lifestyle both physically

and emotionally. First, let's identify some ways that this

pandemic outbreak may have affected you and your

families personally.

During situations like these, high risk groups emerge.

We understand that there are people who may be at

risk physically from contracting the virus due to an

already debilitated state of health. The psychological

risk factor is also present in certain populations of

people. That would include

• older people and people with chronic diseases,

• people who are helping with the response to

COVID-19 such as health care providers or first

responders,

• people who have mental health conditions

including problems with substance abuse, and

• children and teens.

Most of us either fall into one of these categories

or have people we care about who fall into one of

these categories. That's why it is important for us

to recognize that we have to maintain some degree

of normalcy in our lives to help reduce the long-term

effects of a disaster such as this.

We have been inundated with information about

social distancing, sanitizing, maintaining good hygiene

practices, and other infection control measures.

Probably the most difficult aspect of these lifestyle

changes involves social distancing. Humans are social

beings and we must interact with other people in order

to maintain our mental health. While a little isolation is

sometimes a good thing, it looks like we're going to be

maintaining some degree of social distancing for some

time. Here are some strategies that we can employ

during this time of social distancing that may assist

us to maintain that need for social interaction while

observing infection control practices:

• Continue to interact via Telecommunication

devices such as Skype, Zoom, FaceTime, and other

electronic means of communication.

• There is still the possibility of interacting face to

face with other individuals by maintaining a safe

distance of at least six feet between individuals.

• Avoid physical contact such as handshakes,

hugging, or touching.

Remember that social distancing does not

necessarily mean social isolation. There are still things

that are acceptable to do during this challenging

period:

• Avoid situations where there are crowds of

people. You can still interact with select people

that you know do not have any symptoms.

• Still maintain family relationships to the extent

possible.

• Most restaurants are still allowing carryout food

items and some inside dining. This will allow

you to get out into the public briefly while still

maintaining social distancing.

• Take a walk outside. It is important to be out in

the sun to boost endorphins and promote mental

well-being.

• It is understandable that you will still have to go

to the grocery store, pharmacy, or other places

briefly. Try to cluster your activities to reduce the

number of times you have to go out and make a

list so you can reduce your time in these crowded

locations.

• If you have to go out, take your hand sanitizer,

avoid shaking hands or touching other people.

• It is still OK to have small gatherings of friends or

family (less than 10 people) in order to maintain

relationships with others who are experiencing

the same things you are.

As health care providers, it is important that we

recognize symptoms of overwhelming stress and

anxiety in people around us. This would be important

to recognize in ourselves, family members, or others in

the community that may need assistance. Some signs

that stress is becoming too difficult to manage include:

• changes in sleeping or eating habits

• continued fear or worry about one's health or the

health of loved ones to the point of rumination

• a worsening of chronic health conditions already

present

• increased use of alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs

• an increase in compulsive behaviors

• any change in mental status (which could indicate

either a decline in mental health functioning or

the presence of an illness in an elderly person—

delirium)

As we think about ways to manage stress and

anxiety, it's important to remember to keep up with

routines that were present before the pandemic.

A chaotic home environment creates more stress.

However, there are some strategies that you can

implement to reduce stress and anxiety during this

difficult time:

• Adapt your exercise routine that can be continued

in the home by performing exercises that can be

done in a confined space such as stair stepping or

walking in place.

• Cluster your exercise routine into 15 to 20-minute

sessions that can be spaced throughout the day

to reduce boredom.

• Maintain contact with a tight circle of friends or

family that can check on each other to make sure

everyone stays well.

• Stay informed about the progress of the health

situation from trusted and reliable sources such

as the CDC. But don’t let these updates be your

main source of “entertainment.”

• Take this time to catch up on a good movie or

read a good book whenever possible.

• Adopt an attitude of “now I can focus on my

home and family” rather than “I’m stuck here in

this house with nothing to do.”

• Eat healthy, well balanced meals, get plenty of

sleep, and stay well hydrated.

• Choose foods that have a long shelf life rather

than lots of fresh fruits and vegetables because

they spoil more easily and have to be replenished

often.

Remember that children and teens react to and

model behaviors they see adults around them emulate.

It's important to include children and teens in your

routine so they will learn healthy ways to cope with

stress.

Children react to stress in different ways. According

to the CDC, some signs that your child or teen may be

stressed include:

• Excessive crying or irritation in younger children

• Returning to behaviors they have outgrown (for

example, toileting accidents or bedwetting)

• Excessive worry or sadness

• Unhealthy eating or sleeping habits

• Irritability and “acting out” behaviors in teens

• Poor school performance or avoiding school

• Difficulty with attention and concentration

• Avoidance of activities they previously enjoyed

• Unexplained headaches or body pain

• Use of alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs

If you believe a child or teen may be stressed or

overwhelmed by the pandemic, the CDC recommends

ways to support them, including:

• Taking the time to talk with your child or teen

about the COVID-19 outbreak. Additionally, you

should answer questions and share facts about

COVID-19 in a way that your child or teen can

understand.

• Reassuring them that they are safe. Let them

know it is alright if they feel upset. Share with

them how you deal with your own stress so that

they can learn how to cope from you.

• Limit your family’s exposure to news coverage

of the event, including social media. Children

may misinterpret what they hear and can

be frightened about something they do not

understand.

• Trying to keep up with regular routines. If schools

are closed, create a schedule for learning activities

and relaxing or fun activities.

• Be a role model. How? According to the CDC, by

taking breaks, getting plenty of sleep, exercising,

and eating well. Remember to connect with

friends and family members.

As health care providers, we are on the front lines of

this pandemic. As a result, we may be asked to support

others during this traumatic period. We need to be

aware of our own limitations and take measures to

reduce the risk of secondary traumatic stress reactions.

Some of the things that we can do to manage our own

mental health in the workplace include:

• Recognize the signs of physical and mental

exhaustion and take a break whenever these

begin to occur.

• Limit working time to no more than 12 hours per

day. Limit your days to no more than three per

week if you're working 12 hour shifts.

• Be sure to incorporate time with friends, family,

exercising, and breaktime into the work week.

• Ask for help if you're having trouble dealing

with the psychological effects of the coronavirus

outbreak.

• Understand that it is OK to take a break when

feeling stress and that it is not unusual to

experience stress during difficult times such as

these.

For reliable information about the virus outbreak

consult the Centers for Disease Control website at

www.cdc.gov/covid19.

Additional resources for individuals with mental

health conditions or substance abuse problems can

be found on the Substance Abuse and Mental Health

Services Administration website at www.samhsa.gov/

disaster-preparedness.

Additional resources for health care professionals to

monitor for secondary traumatic stress reactions can

be found on the CDC website at www.emergency.cdc.

gov/coping/responders.ASP.

For some tips on what to do with kids at home

during the coronavirus break go to https://www.cpr.

org/2020/03/17/what-to-do-with-kids-at-home-oncoronavirus-break-mental-health-for-parents-too/1


April, May, June 2021 The New Mexico Nurse • Page 13

Self-Care: A Need Now More Than Ever

Courtney Bennett, DNP, PMHNP-BC, FNP-BC

Reprinted with permission

Mississippi RN December 2020

In attempts to meet the growing demands of

COVID-19, registered nurses and advanced practice

registered nurses have stepped up to lead and went

beyond the call of duty to help combat the virus’s

spread. From providing complex care to COVID-19

patients, working long hours, extra shifts, weekends,

and holidays to meet those demands. However, if

asked the question, “When not working, what are

some of your self-care activities?” most would probably

have to take some time to think about the answer.

With the COVID-19 challenges of increased workload,

increased complexity of patient care, the need for

greater nurse presence, and personal challenges of

caring for your family, self-care has become more vital

now than ever before. Although it is a simple notion, in

theory, it is often overlooked.

Self-care is any necessary activity one takes to be

healthy mentally, emotionally, and physically. When we

are healthy, we can operate at our best, in not only our

professional lives by providing the best possible care

to others, but also in our personal lives. Parker Palmer

once said, “Self-care is never a selfish act-it is simply

good stewardship of the only gift I have, the gift I was

put on earth to offer others. Anytime we can listen to

true self and give the care it requires, we do it not only

for ourselves but for the many others whose lives we

touch.” Although it is not easy to put ourselves first

sometimes, especially when caring for our families and

others, we must make an effort to do so. For not only

does our health and well-being depend upon it, but

also the patients we serve. When we put off our selfcare

needs, it becomes problematic over time to care

for others.

Many may remember Dorothea Orem’s Self-Care

Deficit Theory that teaches nurses’ actions should help

patients assume responsibility for self-care deficits

to maintain life, health, and well-being. As nurses,

we must also apply that same principle to our lives.

Nursing can be demanding and stressful in meeting the

patients’ needs, problem solving, supporting patients

and families, and building resilience. However, self-care

is necessary to help cope with these inherited stressors

of the job. As nurses and health care providers, we

must engage in self-care activities to maintain our

health and well-being. Nurses are historically trained to

care for others, often at the expense of our physical,

mental, and emotional well-being. However, neglecting

your self-care can lead to distractions, impaired

decision-making, stress, anxiety, fatigue, insomnia,

anger, absenteeism, and even burn out.

Self-care involves taking time out of your busy

schedule to take care of yourself and engage in

activities you enjoy that can help relieve stress and

fatigue. Sometimes we need to stop and take a

moment to remind ourselves we too are important.

Self-care activities should be enjoyable, not forced, and

something that helps recharge your physical, mental,

and emotional battery. Below are some self-care tips:

1. Get adequate sleep – at least 7-8 hours each

night.

2. Eat healthy foods.

3. Exercise. Adopt an exercise routine that can be

done at home or suitable to your schedule.

4. Schedule yearly wellness exam for regular

preventive care.

5. Start small. Spend 10-30 minutes a day doing

something you enjoy (e.g., listen to music, reading

a book, artwork, adult coloring book, etc.).

6. Remove the phrase “I’m too busy” from your

dialogue-schedule time to go see a movie or

spend time with friends.

7. Engage in mindfulness exercises and meditation,

which can help reduce stress, anxiety, depression,

and increase self-awareness.

8. Daily journaling. Journaling can help clarify

thoughts and feelings and reduce stress.

9. Connect with others.

10. Treat yourself to a spa day.

11. Pay attention to your body. When your body

is telling you something may be wrong, seek

medical attention.

12. Write a list of things you are grateful for or

daily positive affirmations that you can post

somewhere you can see often.

Located in Northeastern AZ

As nurses, we must remember to be proactive in our

self-care to remain healthy and able to care for others.

Self-care is not a selfish act, and in doing so, we are

subsequently more able to take care of others. Even if

you take one small step, you will be more capable of

implementing and identifying more self-care activities

that work for you.

We are seeking highly motivated nurses

Exciting nursing opportunities and breathtaking allure of Navajoland await

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Come join us in Winslow! We are located just seven miles from the southern edge of the Navajo

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• Clinical Nurse

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Nursing Opportunities Available

• Emergency Department RN

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Contact: Patricia Blosser, MSN, FNP-C, MBA, CNO at

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Applications available at sagememorial.com/careers/

Send applications to Human Resources

Fax#: 928-755-4659, hr@sagememorial.com

The Navajo Health Foundation/Sage Memorial Hospital is a drug/alcohol free EOE/AA/Navajo Preference Employer


Page 14 • The New Mexico Nurse April, May, June 2021

Three Risk Areas Nurses Face in the Time of COVID-19

Georgia Reiner, MS/Senior Risk Specialist,

Nurses Service Organization, Healthcare Division, Aon Affinity

Reprinted from West Virginia Nurse October, November, December 2020 Issue

The spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19) reinforces the dedication and

selflessness of nursing professionals. This is a scary and uncertain time for everyone,

especially nurses on the frontlines working tirelessly to help curb the spread of the

COVID-19 and balance an influx in patients.

As nursing professionals tirelessly work to provide the best care possible to their

patients during a difficult time, they need to know the steps to take to mitigate the

risks that can impact their license, career, and reputation.

Three risk areas nurses need to have on their radar include:

1) Using Social Media Best Practices

Nurses are held to a higher standard than others because of their role as

caretakers and because they have intimate access to patients’ private information.

Their social media presence should reflect this heightened responsibility, especially

in this uncertain time. They must consider patients’ right to privacy and act

professionally before posting.

As the media and social media are consumed by COVID-19 news, nurses may

want to join in and share their thoughts or may be tempted to air their grievances.

Online comments or comments to members of the media by a nurse regarding

employers or co-workers, even if posted from home during nonwork hours, may

violate their employer’s social media or media relations policies. Violations of

employer policies may lead to employment consequences for the nurse, including

termination. Nurses may want to think twice before posting or otherwise giving the

appearance they are speaking on behalf of their employer unless authorized to do

so, and must follow all applicable employer policies.

2) Preventing Medication Errors

Nurses must continue to work to catch their own potential medication errors,

as well as the errors of other healthcare providers in the medication administration

chain. Research has found that the majority of medication errors result from human

factors, including inadequate communication, biased reasoning, reduced memory,

and insufficient training and inexperience (Benner et al., 2002; Brady et al., 2009;

Choo et al., 2010; Saintsing et al., 2011; TJC, 2012). Nurses also identify distractions

and fatigue as contributing to medication errors — which are factors that the

COVID-19 crisis can exacerbate (Choo et al.).

Since the beginning of April 2020, the Institute for Safe Medication Practices

(ISMP) has received reports of COVID-19-related medication errors (ISMP, 2020).

One error involved a redeployed OR nurse who administered the wrong type

of inhaler after failing to engage unfamiliar barcode medication administration

technology (ISMP). Other missed dose errors have been reported due to

communication failures between nurses and respiratory therapists (ISMP).

To prevent medication errors and other adverse outcomes, nurses pulled to

an unfamiliar unit should be oriented to the patient population, technologies,

processes, and medications typically used on the newly assigned unit (ISMP,

2020). Nurses should also employ communication techniques such as a doublecheck/“check

back” to verify they understand all verbal orders and instructions

(AHRQ, 2020).

3) Preparing to accept unfamiliar assignments

Nurses are at the forefront of this public health crisis — treating, educating, and

preventing the spread of COVID-19. As the pandemic continues to evolve, nurses

may be given patient assignments outside of their accustomed practice areas and

locations. No circumstances change nurses’ obligation to practice ethically, but

nurses should be aware of their employers’ protocols for protecting nurses operating

in extreme conditions and scarcities, and to ensure that the public receives the most

adequate treatment and care possible in the situation.

With so much still unknown about the coronavirus, it’s also important for nurses

to be aware of the steps they can take if they do not feel equipped to handle an

assignment. When the assignment is within a nurse’s scope of practice but not

within their realm of experience or training, saying “no” could lead to dismissal. In

these scenarios, nurses need to share their concerns with their supervisor. Nurses

should describe the task or assignment they don’t feel equipped to handle, the

reason for their feelings, and the training they would need to be more confident

and better prepared. Speaking up can lead to positive outcomes for nurses and

patients.

These are trying times for health care workers. Being aware of potential risks

helps nurses take steps to protect themselves as they care for others.

References

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality [AHRQ]. (2020, January: last review). Pocket

Guide: TeamSTEPPS®. Team strategies & tools to enhance performance and patient

safety content. https://www.ahrq.gov/teamstepps/instructor/essentials/pocketguide.

html#checkback

Benner, P., Sheets, V., Uris, P., Malloch K., Schwed K., & Jamison, D. (2002). Individual,

practice, and system causes of errors in nursing: A taxonomy. Journal of Nursing

Administration, 32, 509-523. doi: 10.1097/00005110-200210000-00006

Brady, A.-M., Malone, A.-M., & Fleming, S. (2009). A literature review of the individual

and systems factors that contribute to medication errors in nursing practice. Journal

of Nursing Management, 17, 679-697. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2834.2009.00995.x

Choo, J., Hutchinson, A., & Bucknall, T. (2010). Nurses’ role in medication safety. Journal

of Nursing Management, 18, 853-861. doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2834.2010.01164.x

Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP). (2020, May 14). COVID-19-related

medication errors. https://www.ismp.org/resources/covid-19-related-medicationerrors.


April, May, June 2021 The New Mexico Nurse • Page 15

Saintsing, D., Gibson, L. M., & Pennington, A. W. (2011).

The novice nurse and clinical decision-making: How to

avoid errors. Journal of Nursing Management, 19, 354-

359. doi.10.1111/j.1365-2834.2011.01248.x

The Joint Commission [TJC]. (2013). Sentinel event data:

Root causes by event type, 2004 – June 2013. https://

www.medleague.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/

Root_Causes_by_Event_Type_2004-2Q2013.pdf

This risk management information was provided

by Nurses Service Organization (NSO), the nation’s

largest provider of nurses’ professional liability

insurance coverage for over 550,000 nurses since 1976.

Reproduction without permission of the publisher is

prohibited. For questions, send an e-mail to service@

nso.com or call 1-800-247-1500. www.nso.com. The

author may be reached at Georgia.Reiner@aon.com.

ANA/New Mexico

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Type of Work Setting: (e.g. hospital, clinic, school)

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Practice Area: (e.g. pediatrics, education, administration) RN License # State

Nursing Professional Development...continued from page 11

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References

American Nurses Credentialing Center. (2015) 2015

Primary Accreditation Approver Application Manual (1st

ed.) Silver Spring, MD.

Graebe, J. & Dickerson, P.S. (2021). It is not about the

contact hours!. The Journal of Continuing Education in

Nursing, 52, p.55.

Harper, M.G, & Maloney, P. (2016). The Nursing

Professional Development Scope & Standards of

Practice (3rd ed). Chicago, IL: Association for Nursing

Professional Development.

Shinners, J. & Graebe, J. (2020). Continuing education as a

core component of nursing professional development.

The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 51,

p.6.

New Mexico Nursing Education Consortium (NMNEC).

NMNEC concepts. Retrieved February 11, 2021, from

www.NMNEC.org

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above signed thirty (30) days advance written notice. Above signed may cancel this authorization

upon receipt by ANA of written notification of termination twenty (20) days prior to deduction date

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fee for any returned drafts. ANA & State and ANA-Only members must have been a member for six

consecutive months or pay the full annual dues to be eligible for the ANCC certification discounts.

Go to www.JoinANA.org to become

a member and use the code: NMX14

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Searching for dynamic professional people

to join our healthcare team.

Registered Nurse (Nights), Full Time | Registered Nurse (Days), Full Time

Registered Nurse (Surgery), Full Time | Clinic Manager, Full Time

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Email or Fax resume to:

Heather Milton,

Human Resource Director

Email: hmilton@ych.us

Fax: (806) 592-4440

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