Boxoffice_May.09.1960

boxofficepro

1

DALLAS THEATRE UPDATED BEFORE

BEING REOPENED AS THE CAPRI

i

w,HTLE THE architecture of the

Spanish renaissance in the former Melba

Theatre, Dallas, Tex., was retained, the

theatre was given a thorough refurbishing

before being reopened as the Capri.

The front and marquee were remodeled,

the latter now being equipped with tenwatt

decorator clear bulbs to form a chasing

border, and the theatre name in pink

neon.

In addition to the streetside display

cases, the walls of the outer lobby each

have two 40x60 display cases with a 30x80-

inch mirror between them.

The inner lobby was painted in dusty

rose, moss gray and pale ivory, and the

twin staircases on either side retain the

balustrades of the decor period.

A cai'ousel-type concessions stand with

special light runners around the base of

its spiral top and side of the housing supports

of spiral brass was installed. New

carpet was laid over the original marble

floor.

BROKEN AND PITTED

Replace Them With

HEYER

NON-PITTING

The former Melba Theatre in Dallas, Tex., was

recerttly remodeled and re-equipped with furnishings

and projection and sound equipment. Now

named the Capri, the theatre has a marquee with a

chaser

border.

An unusual concessions menu is offered

for this type of theatre, in that popcorn

and hot dogs are sold. Equipment includes

a Cretors popcorn machine, Glenray hot

MIRRORS COST YOU MONEY!

SHULTZ

NON-TARNISHING

METAL REFLECTORS

The H-S All Aluminum, High Efficiency Metal Reflector gives you

top screen illumination at a New Reduced Price, on a straight

ONE YEAR GUARANTEE

The H-S Standard Rhodium Finish Metal Reflector gives you excellent

screen illumination on a

FIVE YEAR GUARANTEE

Eliminate Reflector Replacement Cost! Ask your Theatre Supply

Dealer for Dependable, Economical H-S Metal Reflectors, or write

for full

Consistent

Maximum

particulars to

HEYER-SHULTZ/ INC.

CEDAR GROVE, N. J.

Light

Greater

Economy

at

DIAMOND

PROJECTION

RINGSDORFF CARBON CORP. plani, East McKeesport, Pa.

SAiES OFficE: 15 W. 44th St., New York 36, N.Y. YUkon 6-1966

A carousel-type concessions stand is featured in

the lobby. The men at right center are, from

left. Gene Welch, Capri manager; Norm Levinson,

general manager Trans-Texas Theatres; and Dick

Boner, assistant Capri manager.

dog grill, Bally ice cream cabinet, three

Selmix dispensers and a Smokeshop cigaret

vender.

In the redecorating, the auditorium also

retained its Spanish renaissance feeling

with full-length columns, period bracket

lights and ornate dome.

A principal feature of the updating was

a change in lighting—a more complimentary

color both to theatre features

and to the patrons. An orange-amber

flametint, accented with magenta, creates

an internal glow of soft, pleasing, yet more

than adequate light.

New projection facilities include Victoria-X

70-35mm projectors. Super Cinex

lamps. Super Cinephor lenses, RCA sixtrack

stereophonic sound system and a

42-foot screen.

An unusual featm-e is use of the Wui--

litzer pipe organ for the first time in 20

years. It was recently restored by the

members of the Theatre Organ Ass'n of

Dallas, and adds class to the theatre operation.

Popscar Award to

MacMurray

Fred MacMurray won the 1959 Popscar

poll and has been given the Popscar

Award, which is presented annually to the

movie performer whose film prompted the

greatest sale of popcorn for his laughprovoking

role in "The Shaggy Dog."

According to Jim Blevins, mayor of Popcorn

Village, Nashville, Tenn., this proves

that moviegoers eat more popcorn when

they're laughing than they do while raising

goose pimples, because MacMurray

Diane Baker,

nosed out the female leader.

who had theatre patrons tensely munching

popcorn in "Journey to the Center of the

Earth," a hair raiser.

MacMurray and Miss Baker will receive

Iheir weight in popcorn, said Blevins. who

conducts the poll each year.

Use Rcodcrs' Service Bureau coupon found on

page 43 tor more information about products

described in this issue.

42

The MODERN THEATRE SECTION

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