Ashburton Courier: November 14, 2019

StarMedia.Digital

Page 32, Ashburton’s The Courier, Thursday 14 November 2019

Local news at www.starnews.co.nz

MID CANTERBURY’S

HYDRAULIC SPECIALISTS

LOCALLYOWNED

AND OPERATED

Chertsey site to host

arable field day event

PARTSYOU CAN TRUST WITH

ASERVICE TO KEEP YOUGOING

QUALITYON-CALL SERVICE AVAILABLE

•Sales,installation and serviceofall

hydraulic components

•Inhouse repairs of cylinders,pumps

and hydraulic motors

•I.M.M hose and fittingsavailable

SPOOL VALVES FROM WALVOIL

Ashburton’sleading supplier of Walvoil

hydraulic products andcomponents.

•Wirerope

•Synthetic slings

•High tensile bowshackles

and chain

•Lifting equipment

Call Justin Bennett 027 530 1272

or 027 530 1275

Shop 24/7 03 308 9778

104 MooreStreet,Ashburton

justin@martinbennett.co.nz

2227502

Attendees listen to aspeaker during the Foundation for Arable Research CROPS 2018 field day

at Chertsey last year.

SPREAD YOUR MUCK AND

FILL YOUR RUTS

Spread your muck

Using manureasafertiliser,itwill add organic matter to the soil which

mayimprove soilstructure, aeration,soil moisture-holding capacity

and waterinfiltration

Fixyour pivot ruts

WelshyContracting canfill your ruts quickly andeasily. We candig out

shingle from your ownsiteand screen it ready forrut fillingorwecan

cartshingle in forthe job





Delivered to over 16,065 homes everyweek

2226689

Foundation for Arable Research is hosting their

ARIA event at their arable research site, on State

Highway 1, Chertsey on Wednesday, December 4,

2019.

The ARIA event is FAR’s major South Island field

event and draws hundreds of people from around the

country to hear speakers talk about FAR trial work

being carried out on the research site..

The event runs from 10am to 4pm.

Presentations on the day will cover many issues

which are critical to cropping and its related primary

industries.

And among those to talk are international speaker

Carol Mallory­Smith, who is a professor of weed

science at Oregon State University.

Her main research interests include herbicide

resistance, weed management in agronomic crops,

and weed biology, and these are the topics she will

touch on in her talk at ARIA.

Also speaking is Scott Hardwick (Ag REsearch),

Brad Howlett (Plant and Food Research), Soonie

Chng (Plant and Food Research) as well as FAR staff

Jo Drummond, Matilda Gunnarsson, Phil Rolston,

Richard Chynoweth, Abie Horrocks and Diana

Mathers.

Topics to be covered include; the influence of

cultivar on cereal diseases, Ramularia update, cover

crops for weed management, stem rust ­ can we

predict it?, options for improving glyphosate efficacy

and drone flies and pollination.

Lunch will be provided and there will be chance to

relax and chat with presenters, growers and industry

attendees at the end of the day.

Check out far.org.nz/events for more information.

Farm biosecurity discussed

at Wakanui farm meeting

It’s just amatter of time, if not mere weeks, before

there will be a nationwide regulation push for

stricter on­farm biosecurity and one way for farm

operations tobetter protect themselves is to start

with aplan.

It was the topic for discussion at the recent

Foundation for Arable Research meeting, attended

by around35people, on the property of Maxine and

Eric Watson, at Wakanui, near Ashburton.

FAR’s environment research manager Abie

Horrocks saidthere were at least four risk areas for

concern when it came tofarm biosecurity; visitors

to the property who all have the potential tobring

biosecurity risks such as weed seeds, pathogensand

pests on farm; machinery on and off the property

also able to carry the same biosecurity risks;

animals being transported onand off farm; and

seed and plant material.

Biosecurity was identified as being more and

more important but it meant giving it some

thought, putting it in aplan and into action, she

said.

She wentover thearable biosecurity riskregister

developed byFAR staff for farm owners touse.

It gets farm owners to think about their current

biosecurity practice, including on farm signage and

protocols such as confining vehicles movements to

farm tracks where practicable, asking for verification

of plant healthcertificatesfor imported seed

lines, providing adequate clean down facilities for

visitors to use to maintain good practice and

ensuring those visitors have protocols inplace to

identify or track vehicle movements (from farm to

farm), especially useful incase of incursion.

There isalso provision toinclude how to deal

with any possible incursions andto talk about those

biosecurity issues such as herbicide resistance or

contractor experiences with neighbours.

She said good biosecurity practice was about

identifying risks and managing those risks.

‘‘It’s one of those things that makes absolute,

positive sense,’’ said FAR communication manager

Anna Heslop.

Thebiosecurityrisk register template is available

for any one to access via the FAR website at

www.far.org.nz