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PEABODY

WEEKLY NEWS

Joyce Cucchiara

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MAY 27, 2021 • VOL. 60, NO. 21

SERVING THE COMMUNITY SINCE 1957

16 PAGES • ONE DOLLAR

Melanoma Foundation

on the run in New York

By Anne MArie ToBin

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Steve Fine of Peabody stands with a painting created by his son, Dan, and brother,

Jeffrey, shortly before Dan’s death from melanoma in 1998. As a result of Dan’s

death, Steve founded the Melanoma Education Foundation to raise awareness, primarily

among school students.

PEABODY — The Peabodybased

Melanoma Education

Foundation (MEF) found out

late last week that up to 10 runners

have been approved to run

the New York City Marathon.

“This is a major opportunity

for us,” said Stephen Fine, the

founder and president of MEF.

“We’d been doing the marathon

for about 10 years. After they

canceled last year, it was tough

because we lost all of our fundraising

events. Being able to

participate this year is huge.”

Fine said at least five people

have committed to run for MEF

in the Nov. 3 race. Another two

or three more have expressed

interest in committing. Each

runner must pledge a minimum

amount, which Fine said is

$2,500.

North River approaches next phase

By Anne MArie ToBin

PEABODY — The city’s

North River Resiliency,

Canal Wall, and Riverwalk

Project is on track to move

onto its next phase.

That was the conclusion

of Assistant Director of

Planning Brendan Callahan

and representatives from

Weston and Sampson

Engineers, Inc. at a virtual

public presentation last

Thursday night.

The presentation included

a brief project recap and an

update on site plans, as well

as an introduction of an updated

design for 24 Caller

St.

“This project is a nod to

the North River history and

is an awesome opportunity

for the city,” said Callahan.

“Not only will it be a beautiful

natural area, but it

will also address corridor

flooding issues today and

the future 75 years.”

Callahan said Caller

Street amenities will include

benches, lighting clusters,

FINE, PAGE 3

new landscaping and trees.

Pathways will be a mix of asphalt

and a boardwalk-style

decking with seating, and

part of the project will incorporate

recycled canal-wall

blocks. There will also be a

gathering deck and graffiti

art wall.

RIVER, PAGE 2

Anchors

aweigh for

Academy

grad

For The Weekly neWs

ANNAPOLIS, Md. — Emily R.

Bellavance of Peabody successfully

completed four years of challenging academic,

physical and professional military

training, graduating from the U.S. Naval

Academy with a bachelor’s of science in

mechanical engineering and a commission

as an ensign in the U.S. Navy.

Bellavance is a 2017 graduate of

Peabody Veterans Memorial High School.

At the Academy, Bellavance was

a member of the Midshipmen Action

Group, president of Navy Field Hockey,

and served as the Battalion Adjutant.

Bellavance was selected for Navy pilot

school and will be reporting to flight

training in Pensacola, Fla.

Founded in 1845, the U.S. Naval

Academy today is a prestigious fouryear

service academy that prepares midshipmen

morally, mentally and physically

to be professional officers in the naval

service.

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2

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 27, 2021

North River/Riverwalk approaches next phase

RIVER

FROM PAGE 1

Key components of the site

include the white birch and

river birch groves, and public

art displays have been added to

the design.

“At the first meeting in

January, there was much interest

in incorporating more art

into the project, so we adjusted

the design to reflect that,”

Callahan said.

Landscape architect Cass

Chroust said other elements

desired by residents include

historical/interpretive markers,

plantings and small gardens,

Instagrammable spots, a

bird-observation area and more

trees with expanded green

canopies.

“These kinds of features

that add greater environmental

focus are always on (the) top

of our minds when it comes to

these projects,” Chroust said.

The Howley Street site

plan calls for a bridge over

Strongwater Brook, an

8-foot wide asphalt path with

fencing, a boardwalk overlook

and seating area, pedestrian

lighting and a rapid-flashing

beacon crosswalk.

The Caller Street and Wallis

Street site plans calls for a

new canal wall (which has

been moved back for flood

mitigation) and vegetative

slope, a 10-foot boardwalk

with overlook seating, as well

as an 8-foot asphalt path with

fencing and rapid-flashing beacons

at crosswalks. Callahan

said the project will also include

1,600 feet of pathways.

The presentation included

BLUE

FROM PAGE 1

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The city’s vision for Caller Street along the North River includes paths, public art and landscaping.

the results of a survey conducted

in connection with the

first community meeting in

January.

Sixty-four percent of respondents

said the project (excluding

Caller Street) suits their

travel and recreation needs,

while 96 percent supported incorporation

of public art along

the Riverwalk. Respondents

were split on the Caller Street

component, with 43 percent

preferring an art walk/performance

space and 43 percent

More than 4,400 men and

women representing every state

in the U.S. and several foreign

countries make up the student

body, known as the Brigade of

Midshipmen.

U.S. News and World Report

has recognized the Naval

Academy as a top five undergraduate

engineering school

and a top 20 best liberal arts

college. Midshipmen learn

from military and civilian instructors

and participate in intercollegiate

varsity sports and

extracurricular activities.

They also study subjects

such as leadership, ethics,

small arms, drill, seamanship

and navigation, tactics, naval

engineering and weapons and

military law. Upon graduation,

midshipmen earn a Bachelor of

Science degree in a choice of 25

different subject majors and go

on to serve at least five years of

exciting and rewarding service

opting for a leisurely lawn and

deck space.

With respect to Caller Street,

respondents cited several elements

they felt were missing

from the design, including security

cameras, barbecue fire

pits, covered areas for rain, signage

on the Native American

history of the river, space for

food trucks and restrooms.

Callahan said the project is

in phase two, and is expected

to be completed in June. Phase

two includes the preparation

She’s headed for the deep blue

as commissioned officers in

the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine

Corps.

The Brigade of Midshipmen

is composed of approximately

4,400 students from every state

in the union. Each year, approximately

1,200 young men

and women are admitted to the

Naval Academy’s incoming

class.

The academy’s alumni include

one president, 21 members

of Congress, five governors,

73 Medal of Honor

recipients, two Nobel Prize

winners, 52 astronauts, and

4,000 admirals and generals.

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of plans to bring Riverwalk to

75 percent design. All permit

applications are ready to go,

and are expected to be secured

during phase three. The project

will reach 100 percent design

sometime in 2022-23.

Additional grants will be

sought, comprehensive environmental

work will be

conducted and a remediation

plan will be developed.

Grant sources include EPA

Cleanup, the Gateway Cities

Greenway Park Program,

BEVERLY — J Barrett &

Company is pleased to announce

that Realtor Tina

McManus has joined the agency

in the Cummings Center office.

A realtor since 2002,

McManus has amassed an impressive

record helping clients

achieve their real estate goals

— whether buying, selling or

investing.

“As a company, one of our

goals is to constantly expand

the depth of our in-house expertise

so having yet another real-estate

professional of Tina’s

caliber is very exciting for our

firm,” says Jon Gray, president.

“In addition, Tina’s fierce determination

as well as her ability

to help people navigate the entire

real estate process will benefit

every client who works with

her.”

McManus lives in Beverly

with her husband, Mike, and

their two collies.

COURTESY | CITY OF PEABODY

Municipal Vulnerability

Preparedness (MVP) Action,

Member Designated Projects

(MDP) and the Community

Preservation Act (CPA).

To date, the project has received

$441,588 in funding

from the city and $1.36 million

from state and federal sources.

For more information,

go to www.tinyurl.com/

RiverwalkWebinar2 or contact

Callahan via email at brendan.

callahan@peabody-ma.gov, or

call 978-538-5780.

McManus joins

J Barrett & Co.

“Buying and/or selling real

estate today can be a complex

process so being able to facilitate

that process from the very

beginning to the last day, when

keys change hands, regardless

of the goal, is exceptionally

satisfying,” she said, adding:

“One of my great pleasures is

finding the right house for a

client and seeing them happily

settled. J Barrett & Company’s

reputation for their determination

to ensure clients are happy

and successful is certainly one

reason I wanted to work with

the agency.”

Established in January 2007,

J Barrett & Company is a service-oriented

company that has

quickly become the premiere

privately-owned real estate firm

on the North Shore. The company

serves the North Shore and

Cape Ann areas from offices in

Beverly, Gloucester, Ipswich,

Manchester, Marblehead, and

in Prides Crossing.


MAY 27, 2021

MELANOMA

FROM PAGE 1

MEF was organized by Fine

and his wife, Gail, in 1999 after

they lost their 26-year old son,

Dan, to the disease in October

1998.

Dan, who worked in

California, had returned home

for a surprise visit during

Memorial Day weekend in

1996. Steve noticed a large dark

spot on Dan’s back and advised

his son to have it checked out

when he got back to California.

Dan followed through on the

request and learned he had latestage

melanoma. He moved

back home for treatment. By

late 1997, the 1990 Veterans

Memorial High School graduate

was healthy enough to return to

his daily routine, including vigorous

workouts (Dan had been

an athlete, rowing varsity crew

at the University of Miami).

In April 1998, the cancer had

spread to his liver and lungs and

was inoperable.

“No one has to die from

melanoma, it’s absolutely preventable,”

said Fine. “Like 90

percent of all cases, we had no

family history of melanoma,

Dan was not a sun worshipper,

he had a dark complexion. This

all came down to he just didn’t

know. Nobody taught him in

school about how to prevent

melanoma. That’s why we felt

our focus had to be on education,

working with high-school

and middle-school teachers to

educate young people about the

importance of early detection.”

The Foundation started

slowly, with a few North Shore

high schools. Gradually, operations

expanded to include most

of New England.

“At that point, we realized

we didn’t have the resources we

needed to reach more schools, so

we put it all online,” Fine said.

The initiative took off. Today,

the Foundation’s lessons, programs

and services are used in

all 50 states at more than 1,700

schools.

The MEF website focuses

on giving teachers and students

access to free lesson plans, educational

videos and general

information on early detection,

prevention and the importance

of self-examinations.

“For people who are not using

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 3

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PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Steve Fine founded the Melanoma Education Foundation to raise awareness about the disease following the death of his son, Dan,

pictured right, in 1998.

sunscreen protection, prevention

requires a major behavioral

change for most people,”

said Fine. “Once-a-month selfexams

are easier, so it is more

successful.”

The program utilizes separate

videos tailor made for middleand

high-school students, with

each focusing on early detection.

The Foundation also provides

facial skin analyzer machines to

area schools.

“We can make them ‘OMG’

machines. It’s startling to see

the kids’ reactions when they

see how much damage has been

done,” Fine said. “It doesn’t

show skin cancer, but the good

news is the machines do raise

awareness.”

Fine said while the average

age of melanoma victims is in

the mid-60s, there tends to be a

huge spike in new case detections

among those in their midto-late

20s.

“When kids graduate from

high school, the vulnerability

increases tremendously,” said

Fine.

Fine’s efforts have been

recognized by numerous organizations.

He was the recipient

of a 2008 Boston Celtics

“Heroes Among Us,” award, the

2009 Peabody Area Chamber

of Commerce Community

Spirit Award and the 2011

Massachusetts General Hospital

Cancer Center Top 100 Award.

In 2013, he received a New

England Patriots Myra Kraft

Community MVP Award.

Fine said his son’s story is not

uncommon.

“We know of other similar

families whose children have

been diagnosed with melanoma

at an early age, in some

cases dying from it,” Fine said.

“Melanoma is a tale of two cities;

While cases are increasing,

deaths are declining. If you find

it early you’re more likely to

survive, but if you don’t, the opposite

is true. That’s why early

detection is so important.”

For more information about

MEF or to make a donation,

go to its websites at https://

skincheck.org/ and https://melanomaeducation.net/


4

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 27, 2021

Police Log

Monday, May 17

Accidents

A report of a hit-and-run motor

vehicle crash at 11:20 a.m. Monday

at 15 Juniper Road. A report of a

motor vehicle crash at 2:33 p.m.

Monday at Bishop Fenwick School at

99 Margin St.; at 3:10 p.m. Monday

at The Cheesecake Factory at 210C

Andover St.; at 4:44 p.m. Monday

at Best Gas at 129 Newbury St.;

at 5:46 p.m. Monday at Rousselot

International at 227 Washington St.

Theft

A report of a stolen motor vehicle

at 4:18 p.m. Monday at Avis Car

Rental/Holiday Inn at 1 Newbury St.

Tuesday, May 18

Complaints

A report of an injured peacock in

the parking lot at 7:18 a.m. Tuesday

at Plaza Motel at 125 Newbury St.

An officer checked the area and

could not find the animal.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle

crash at 10:44 a.m. Tuesday at 1R

Newbury St.; at 1:13 p.m. A report

of a hit-and-run motor vehicle crash

at 2:49 p.m. Tuesday at Foster and

Main streets; at 3:23 p.m. Tuesday

PEABODY

WEEKLY NEWS

(USPS #66)

Telephone: (978) 532-5880 • Fax: (978) 532-4250

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 5, Lynn, MA 01903

News and Advertising Offices: 110 Munroe St., Lynn, MA 01901

Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday

www.weeklynews.net

Editor: Thor Jourgensen tjourgensen@essexmediagroup.com

Reporter: Anne Marie Tobin atobin@essexmediagroup.com

Sports Editor: Mike Alongi malongi@essexmediagroup.com

Advertising Reps: Ralph Mitchell rmitchell@essexmediagroup.com

Patricia Whalen pwhalen@essexmediagroup.com

Ernie Carpenter ecarpenter@essexmediagroup.com

Local Subscription Rate: $20 per year (52 issues) • Single Copy: $1.00

Deadlines: News: Monday, noon; Display Ads: Monday, noon;

Classified Ads: Monday, noon;

No cancellations accepted after deadline.

The Peabody Weekly News is published 52 times per year on Thursday by Essex

Media Group, Inc. No issue is printed during the week of Christmas. The Peabody

Weekly News is delivered via US Mail to homes in Peabody. It is also available

in several locations throughout Peabody. The Peabody Weekly News will not be

responsible for typographical or other errors in advertisements, but will reprint that

part of an advertisement in which a typographical error occurs if notified immediately.

Advertisers must notify the Peabody Weekly News of any errors in advertisements

on the FIRST day of insertion. The publisher reserves the right to reject,

omit or edit any copy offered for publication.

PEABODY WEEKL Y

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MAIL TO PEABODY WEEKLY NEWS, P.O. BOX 5, LYNN, MA 01903

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at 10 Basford Court; at 5:42 p.m.

Tuesday at CVS at 79 Lynnfield St.

A two-car crash with one car

going off the road into a stone wall

at 738 Lowell St. was reported at

4:57 p.m. Tuesday. The passengers

were taken to Salem Hospital.

A car into a tree was reported at

12:10 a.m.

Fire

A report of a brush fire at 11:21

p.m. Tuesday at 19 Styles Drive.

Police reported the fire was knocked

down before it approached the

residences.

Overdose

A report of an overdose at 8:18

p.m. Tuesday at Tannery Apartments

at 50 Warren St. An officer reported

the person accidentally took too

much of her nighttime prescription.

Wednesday, May 19

Arrests

Kevin M. Lynch, 39, of 91 Green

St., Reading, was arrested on six

warrants at 6:15 p.m. Wednesday.

Accidents

Wednesday at FedEx/Kinko’s

at 240 Andover St.; at 2:41 p.m.

Wednesday at 136 Main St. and 8

Caller St.; at 9:02 p.m. Wednesday

at Sylvan Street Grille at 12 Sylvan

St. Wednesday on Forest Street.

One person was taken to Lahey

Hospital.

Assaults

A report of an assault at 3:02 p.m.

Wednesday at Brooksby Farm at 54

Felton St. A caller reported three

people beat him up near the farm.

Evan N. Voight, 18, of 44 Wright St.,

Stoneham; James Norman Osmond,

19, of 169B Thatcher Road, Apt. B,

Rockport; and Lillian Faye Coman,

18, of 15 Fayette St., Beverly; were

all issued summonses for the same

charges: assault and battery with a

dangerous weapon and assault and

battery.

Thursday, May 20

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle crash

at 4:50 p.m. Thursday at 15 Juniper

Road; at 6:26 p.m. Thursday at

Walgreens at 229 Andover St.; at

8:05 p.m. Thursday at Summit Plaza

at 145 Summit St.

Complaints

A report of a neighborhood dispute

at 7:33 p.m. Thursday at 28

Veterans Memorial Drive. A caller

reported her neighbor was throwing

water in her window. An officer

spoke with the neighbor, who said

the water was not thrown with any

ill intent toward the woman.

A report of a disturbance at 7:47

p.m. Thursday on Holten Street. A

caller reported a woman was running

topless down the roadway. She

was taken to Salem Hospital and its

security staff was advised.

Fire

A report of a brush fire at 12:31

p.m. Thursday on Route 128 North,

Exit 40B.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 4:30 p.m.

Thursday at Care One at Peabody

Glen at 199 Andover St.

Friday, May 21

Arrests

Alena L. Barros, 38, of 2

Magnolia Way, Apt. 2, was arrested

and charged with OUI-liquor second

offense and negligent operation of

a motor vehicle at 6:03 p.m. Friday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle crash

at 2:19 p.m. Friday at McDonald’s

at 133 Main St.; at 2:25 p.m. Friday

at Holden Oil at 91 Lynnfield St.; at

6:09 p.m. Friday at 21 Caller St.; at

6:32 p.m. Friday at 268 Washington

St.; at 9:46 a.m. Sunday at Peabody

Shell on Summit Street.

A report of a hit-and-run motor

vehicle crash at 3:22 p.m. Friday at

CVS at 79 Lynnfield St.; at 3:32 p.m.

Friday at West Memorial School at

15 Bow St.; at 9:48 p.m. Sunday at

Interior Expressions at 117 Lowell

St.

A Jeep into a pole was reported at

5:59 p.m. Friday at 268 Washington

St.

A report of operating under the

influence of liquor at 6:03 p.m.

Friday at 29 Hourihan St. A caller

reported a black Volvo crashed into

the woods. Alena L. Barros, 38, was

arrested (see arrests).

A report of a hit-and-run motor

vehicle crash at 1:36 a.m. Friday at

16 Warren St.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a breaking and entering

at 10:23 a.m. Friday at 9

Munroe Court. A past break into the

storage unit on the property was reported.

The suspect was reportedly

seen by neighbors.

A report of suspicious activity at

9:58 a.m. Friday at Federal Express

at 4 Lakeland Park Drive. A large

box of marijuana, weighing approximately

35 pounds, was reported.

The police department took possession

of the package, with plans for

its Criminal Investigation Division to

follow up on the incident.

Complaints

A report of suspicious activity

at 5:45 p.m. Friday at Barnes and

Noble at 210B Andover St. A caller

reported there was a couple inside a

vehicle acting inappropriately.

Suspicious activity was reported

at 5:53 p.m. Friday at 13 Sewall

St. A caller reported there was a

woman in her backyard who was

only wearing a black tank top. Lisa

Marie Ragusa, 41, of 24 Holten St.,

Apt. 3, was issued a summons for

assault and battery and disturbing

the peace.

A report of suspicious activity at

8:06 p.m. Friday at 8 Pump Station

Road. A caller reported a suspicious

woman had walked through

his backyard barefoot and said that

someone was following her into the

cemetery. An officer transported the

woman back to her vehicle at C&C

Lobster.

A report of a woman trying

to help a family of geese cross

Lynnfield Street by stopping traffic

near Wardhurst Shish Kebob &

Steakhouse. The Fire Department

was able to free a duckling from the

storm drain and the family was escorted

across the street to the fields

in back of the restaurant.

Saturday, May 22

Accident

A report of a bicyclist struck by a

vehicle at 5:28 p.m. Saturday at 28

Paleologos St. A juvenile was taken

to Salem Children’s Hospital.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 6:50 a.m.

Saturday at 27 Walnut St. A caller

reported a catalytic converter was

stolen from a box truck.

A larceny was reported at 11:57

a.m. Saturday at D&D Automotive

at 20 Wallis St. A caller reported a

catalytic converter was cut out of a

pickup truck sometime overnight.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 9:45

a.m. Saturday at Forward Motion

Logistics at 7 Webster St. A caller

reported two catalytic converters

were cut off of their vehicles.

Sunday, May 23

Vandalism

Vandalism was reported at 8:24

a.m. Sunday at W Sector at 6 Park

St.

Monday, May 24

Complaint

A report of suspicious activity at

6:14 a.m. Monday at 19 May St. A

caller reported a person was casing

his home. Police reported there was

no issue and that the person had returned

home.

Fire

A small brush fire was reported

at 1:56 a.m. Monday on Newbury

Street. The Fire Department and

State Police responded.


MAY 27, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 5

Religious News

All Saints Episcopal Church

of the North Shore

Good morning and thank you!

All Saints Episcopal Church of

the North Shore in Danvers has

in-person worship, as well as

Zoom opportunities on Sunday

mornings and throughout the

week. Our webpage is https://

allsaintsepiscopalnorthshore.

org/, and we are also on Facebook,

Twitter and Instagram.

In-person Worship

Join us for our modified service

of the Holy Eucharist at

8:30 Sunday mornings, with

COVID-19 safety protocols in

place. Advanced registration is

required (call the church at 978-

774-1150).

Outreach

Join us on the third Sunday

of each month as we prepare 40-

50 bagged lunches for the food

insecure in Peabody. Contact the

church office (978-774-1150) if

you would like to donate food or

help prepare the lunches.

We also have the following

Zoom services and fellowship

opportunities:

Worship on Sundays at 10

a.m.

https://zoom.us/j/134596872

Meeting ID: 134 596 872

Phone: 929-205-6099

Coffee hour on Tuesdays at

10 a.m.

https://zoom.us/j/201985541

Meeting ID: 201 985 541

BOSTON — Peabody artist

On-Kyeong Seong will exhibit

in the South End during June.

For Seong, the natural world

embodies beauty and ugliness.

Her exhibition, "Graft," is influenced

by observing nature

under magnification.

The distinctive shapes and

forms resemble unusual monstrous

objects, which are then

transformed into magical elements

in her work. Using a sewing

machine to freehand “draw”

on her surfaces, her mind and

hand are freed from rational

control, allowing for the subconscious

to surface.

Seong-Kyeong then blends

this free expression with more

controlled mediums such as oil

paint, mixed media, and collage

to reveal abstracted natural

forms.

The central theme throughout

the three exhibitions at

Kingston Gallery in June is the

careful observation of one’s

surroundings.

Phone: + 1 929 205 6099

Frank Time Discussion on

the second Wednesdays of each

month at 5:15 pm

https://us02web.zoom.

us/j/85499949543

Meeting ID: 854 9994 9543

Phone: +1 929 205 6099

Morning Prayer on Fridays at

8:30 a.m.

h t t p s : / / z o o m .

us/j/96760775904

Meeting ID: 967 6077 5904

Phone: +1 929 205 6099 US

Perfect Paws Pet Ministry,

the third Sunday of each month

at 5 p.m.

https://zoom.us/

j/990855545?pwd=YVN4bzFhOEpLZkY3Y1dxQkt2OTJMdz09

Meeting ID: 990 855 545

Password: Saintfranc

Parish office: Call 978-774-

1150 or email allstoffice@

gmail.com

Peace,

Michelle Behling, Parish Administrator

--

Michelle Behling, Parish Administrator

All Saints Episcopal Church

of the North Shore

46 Cherry Street

Danvers, MA 01923

978-774-1150 / allstoffice@

gmail.com

Carmelite Chapel

Carmelite Chapel in the

Northshore Mall

Holy Mass:

Monday through Friday:

Noon and 3 p.m.

Saturday: Noon, 4 and 5:30

p.m.

Sunday: Noon

Confession:

Monday through Friday

11-11:45 a.m. and 2-2:45

p.m.

Saturday

11-11:45 a.m. and 2:45-3:45

p.m.

Gift Shop

Open Monday through Saturday:

11 a.m.-5 p.m.

Phone: 978-531-8340

Congregation Tifereth Israel

Due to Covid-19 restrictions,

we are currently holding our

Shabbat services monthly on

Zoom. The link is sent out via

email to our members and by

request to info@ctipeabody.org.

Updated information can also be

found at our website: www.ctipeabody.org

or by calling 978-

531-8135. President, Elliot Hershoff/Soloist,

Joanne Pressman.

North Shore Baptist Church

706 Lowell St., W. Peabody

Sharing God’s Truth for

Life’s Transitions

Small Group Worship & Bible

Study (in-person) - 10:30

a.m. Sundays. For info, prayer or

help, contact us at 978-535-6186

or office@northshorebaptistchurch.org.

Working in 2D media, artists

take in their immediate landscapes

and delve deeper into

nature’s complexities.

In the Kingston's Main Gallery,

450 Harrison Avenue, Jeesoo

Lee’s richly textured pieces

collage many fragments of

place and time in her first solo

exhibition at Kingston Gallery.

St. Clare of Assisi

(non-Roman)

Our Parish family welcomes

everyone. We are not here to

condemn, criticize, or judge

you. Rather, we want to offer

our love, our support, and our

prayers for you. Your presence

is an important part of our celebration

of the Mass and when

you are not here, you are missed!

The Rev. Fr. Mike Otero-Otero,

O.S.F.

978-804-2250

www.stclarepeabody.org

Holy Mass: Saturdays at 3

p.m.

St. Clare Mission (feeding

the hungry)

Saturdays at 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

Mission Outreach Services

(Homelessness Outreach)

Call Jill at 267-481-5725.

Al-Anon Meetings

Find us at:

https://alanonma.org/.

St. John Lutheran Church

Worship: 9:30 a.m., Sunday,

in-person and on Zoom

Bible Study: 11 a.m.

22 Ellsworth, Peabody

Website: https://stjohnpeabody.org

Church phone: 978-531-1731

Pastor: The Rev. Charles N.

Stevenson

Email: stjohnpastor@earthlink.net

For the Zoom link, please

Peabody artist exhibits June 2-27

COURTESY PHOTO | KINGSTON GALLERY

“After the Winter is Gone,” by Peabody artist On-Kyeong

Seong is included in June’s Kingston Gallery show.

email the pastor.

Temple Ner Tamid

Service Times

Sunday to Thursday: 7 p.m.

Friday: 8 p.m.

Saturday: 9:30 a.m.

Holidays as published.

Join Us Online.

Services and all other programs

are being held virtually

using Zoom, Facebook and

YouTube

Rabbi Richard Perlman

Associate Rabbi Bernie

Horowitz

Visit our website

www.templenertamid.org

Contact office

978-532-1293

office@templenertamid.org

368 Lowell St.

Peabody, Mass.

Temple Tiferet Shalom

Services and all other programs

are being held virtually

via Zoom and StreamSpot.

Services Friday evenings at

7:30 p.m. and Saturday mornings

at 9:30 a.m.

Rabbi David Kudan

Music Director Bryna Toder

Tabasky

Prayer Leader Gary Gillette

489 Lowell St.

Peabody, Mass

978-535-2100

www.templetiferetshalom.org

In the Center Gallery, Ponnapa

Prakkamakul, in Samatha:

Stillness in the Chaos, her first

solo exhibition at Kingston Gallery,

exhibits her daily paintings

of the morning sky from her

apartment window during the

shelter-in-place order of 2020.

Examining the duality in

nature’s beauty and ugliness,

On-Kyeong Seong’s Graft in

the Project Space Gallery incorporates

sewing with painting

and collage to splice together

intention with the subconscious.

An artist-run gallery incorporated

in 1982, Kingston Gallery

is Boston’s second oldest

such institution presently in

operation. The gallery exhibits

the work of Boston-area contemporary

artists, and features

a diverse range of media, including

painting, photography,

sculpture, and installation.

Located in the SoWa district

in the South End, the exhibitions

are free and open to

the public. Gallery hours are

Wednesday–Sunday 12–5 p.m.,

and by appointment.

Penny McKenzie-Venuto

Realtor ® , CBR ® , SRES ®

Commonwealth Real Estate

Northrup Associates

26 Main Street

Lynnfield, MA 01940

Cell 781-929-7237

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A member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates, LLC


6

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 27, 2021

For the Weekly neWs

Important information from

the National Center for Injury

Prevention and Control:

There are four things you can

do to prevent falls:

Speak up. Talk openly with

your health care provider about

fall risks and prevention. Have

your doctor review your medicines.

Keep moving. Begin an exercise

program to improve your

strength and balance.

Get an annual eye exam. Replace

eyeglasses as needed.

Make your home safe: Remove

clutter and tripping hazards.

Contact your local community

or senior center for

information on exercise fall-prevention

programs, and options

for improving home safety.

Stay independent: One in

four people 65 and older fall

each year. What can you do to

Carol MCMahon

For the Weekly neWs

PEABODY — In tough

times, communities find

strength in people — and people

find strength in their communities.

In the past year, we’ve seen

this time and again in Peabody

as friends, neighbors, and businesses

have found new ways to

support each other.

In our community, older

adults are a key source of this

strength. Through their experiences,

successes, and difficulties,

they have built resilience

that helps them to face new

challenges.

When communities tap into

this, they become stronger too.

Each May, the Administration

for Community Living leads

the celebration of Older Americans

Month (OAM). This

year’s theme is Communities

of Strength, recognizing the

June is National Safety Month

stay independent?

Many people make financial

plans for retirement, but not everyone

plans for other changes

that may come with age. This includes

changes in your mobility

and your ability to get around.

It isn’t easy to talk about, but

as we get older, physical changes

can make it harder to get around

and do things we want or need

to do, like driving, shopping or

doing household chores. (There

may be a time when you still

need to get around, but can no

longer drive.)

You might not have mobility

problems now, but you could in

the future. You may even know

others who already do: perhaps a

parent, relative, friend or neighbor.

While it may not be possible

to prevent all of these changes,

there are actions you and your

loved ones can take today, and

as you age, to help keep you safe

and independent tomorrow.

May is Older Americans Month

important role older adults play

in fostering the connection and

engagement that build strong,

resilient communities.

Strength is built and shown

not only by bold acts, but also

small ones of day-to-day life

— a conversation shared with

a friend, working in the garden,

trying a new recipe, or taking

time for a cup of tea on a busy

day. And when we share these

activities with others — even

virtually or by telling about

the experience later — we help

them build resilience too.

This year, the Peabody Senior

Center will celebrate Older

Americans Month by encouraging

community members to

share their experiences. Together,

we can find strength — and

create a stronger future.

Here are some ways to share

and connect:

Look for joy in the everyday:

Celebrate small moments and

• Office • Skate Room

• Skate Guards •Snack Bar

Part time hours can be arranged

• On the MBTA Bus Route 429

Senior News

ordinary pleasures by taking

time to recognize them. Start

a gratitude journal and share it

with others via social media, or

call a friend or family member

to share a happy moment or to

say thank you.

Reach out to neighbors:

Even if you can’t get together

in person right now, you can

still connect with your neighbors.

Leave a small gift on their

doorstep, offer to help with outdoor

chores, or deliver a homecooked

meal.

Build new skills: Learning

something new allows us to

practice overcoming challenges.

Take an art course online or

try a socially distanced outdoor

movement class to enjoy learning

with others in your community.

Have a skill to share? Find

an opportunity to teach someone,

even casually.

Share your story: There’s

a reason storytelling is a

time-honored activity. Hearing

how others experience the world

helps us grow. Interviewing

family, friends, and neighbors

can open up new conversations

and strengthen our connections.

When people of different

ages, backgrounds, abilities,

and talents share experiences —

through action, story, or service

— we help build strong communities.

And that’s something

to celebrate!

The Peabody Council on

Aging recently purchased a tent

and is awaiting its arrival. We

plan to schedule outdoor classes

such as line dancing, Zumba

and some chair yoga under the

new tent.

We are also planning to have

some classes meet on-site as

well.

We will gradually work toward

opening up some areas of

the senior center and eventually

will offer lunch here again.

Until then, we have decided to

continue our frozen meals program.

At the present time, our

large dining room and stage

area is being used as a vaccination

site, which will continue

over the next several months.

Staff members will be in

contact with the teachers and

participants of many of our

classes in the next few weeks.

Per Centers for Disease Control

and Prevention guidelines, we

will require participants to fill

out paperwork with their contact

information in case there

is a need for our Health Department

to do contact tracing.

Classes will be limited and

registration will be required.

Unfortunately we will be unable

to accommodate drop-in

visitors at this time. You will

need to be given an appointment

in order to attend.

We know this has been a

very difficult time for so many

and we will be adding programs

and services as quickly, but

most importantly, as safely as

possible. Please feel free to call

us at any time at 978-531-2254

for more information.

Carol McMahon is the Peabody

Council on Aging administrative

assistant.

Call Meghan or Jerry

781-233-9507

or

617-620-9201

Open 7 days a week

425R Broadway, Saugus, MA 01906

Looking for past issues?

Find them on weeklynews.net


MAY 27, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 7

HOW THEY DO IT

No foiling these fencing aficionados

By eLyse Carmosino

By Tréa Lavery

PEABODY — The city's Massachusetts

House and Senate delegation

have plenty of planned legislation,

from budget amendments

to proposed bills.

“It's a very busy time in the legislature

as the Senate undertakes

its FY22 budget debate and the

Commonwealth moves toward its

new normal," said state Sen. Joan

Lovely. “As we progress forward,

I will be working closely with my

legislative colleagues, regional

leaders and stakeholders to make

sure there are safeguards in place

to support families, businesses,

employees and all residents.”

Lovely has proposed a budget

amendment that would provide

$75,000 for a master plan for Peabody’s

Centennial Park, as well as

funding for the Home Works program,

which provides education

for children living in emergency

shelters, and for child sexual

abuse prevention.

In addition, she secured funding

in the state’s Economic Development

bill for the Peabody

Students of The Tanner City Fencing Club meet at Higgins Middle School for practice.

PEABODY — The Tanner

City Fencing Club has long

served as a supportive place for

city residents to learn the sport

of fencing.

Founded at the Salem YMCA

in 1958 by Maître Joe Pechinsky,

the club is led by Jane Hall

Carter and James Carter, a team

of highly accomplished fencers

and coaches who donate their

time each week to advance the

sport of fencing.

For Jane Carter, her love of

the sport started at age 13, when

she and her childhood best

friend, Janice, wanted to find a

sport to fill the time before softball

season.

“We both tried out for basketball

and got cut, and she

asked if I wanted to find something

to keep in shape for softball,”

Carter said. “The two of

us went to the rec department

for fencing … and the first night

we worked hard, and the next

day we were walking around

school with our legs in absolute

pain because you use muscles

you don’t normally use..

“The two of us were like,

‘Are you tired? I’m not tired.’

We pushed each other.”

Like many students in the

club, Carter, who now ranks

No. 1 in the U.S. in her age

group, credits her success in

the sport to Pechinsky, who she

said was dedicated to encouraging

the club’s young fencers.

“I just can’t say enough

about Joe,” Carter said. “We

keep the club going in his honor.

When I started, I had been practicing

for three months when

he decided Janice and I needed

to start competing. He showed

up at our houses with bags of

equipment. I don’t know how

he knew our sizes, but he never

charged us for lessons. It’s kind

of why I’m still doing what Joe

did, which is giving back.”

The club is intended to be an

affordable and supportive environment

for children and adults

of all backgrounds. To make

Trolley, which will help improve

transportation between the city

and neighboring Salem and reduce

the number of cars on the

road.

The House of Representatives

has finished the budget process,

and state Reps. Tom Walsh and

Sally Kerans have supported

amendments that passed.

Walsh proposed including

$100,000 to fund repairs to the

Route 128 overpass in Peabody,

which he said is very important.

“If you drive underneath the

Route 128 overpass, you’ll see the

facade is in dire need of repair,” he

said. “You can see the rebar sticking

out in patches.”

In addition to those successes,

Walsh had an amendment

fail to pass which he is hoping

to pass legislatively. He hopes to

use federal relief funds related to

COVID-19 to create a fund for

restaurants that were not eligible

for Paycheck Protection Program

(PPP) money.

He said that some businesses,

including ones incorporated after

the PPP deadline of June 30, 2019,

fencing more accessible to the

masses, the Salem Y provides

its members with all necessary

fencing equipment and only

charges members a nominal

yearly membership fee to help

defray equipment costs.

Membership in the club includes

group and private lessons,

as well as open fencing in

foil, sabre and épée. In addition,

informal instruction is always

available from other members.

Fencing promotes physical

fitness, the ability to develop

strategy and concentration, and

builds comradery and respect,

Carter said — all valuable skills

still needed help getting back on

their feet after the pandemic.

Kerans, who represents West

Peabody as part of her district, is

the newest member of the legislative

team. She is also supporting

a bill that did not make it into the

House budget which would support

the state’s local and regional

public health departments and

make it easier for them to collaborate.

“During the pandemic, we

saw communities come together

and do a nice collaboration, but it

wasn't easy for them to get permission,”

Kerans said. “We are only

as strong as our weakest public

health department. Peabody has

an extremely strong public health

department, and we want to make

sure that we try to have that everywhere

or have the capacity to join

with another community.”

Walsh is sponsoring a bill that

would require training for employees

at hotels and motels to

recognize the signs of human trafficking

and display human trafficking

hotlines prominently.

“This came about through

for young learners.

“It’s a very different sport.

It’s equated with physical

chess,” she said. “There’s not

only athleticism, but also a lot

of tactics. A lot of people get

into it because they want something

different.

“It’s both an individual and

a team sport. You fence somebody

individually head-tohead,

but your scores are captured

together in team matches,

so there’s a team component to

it that’s very exciting.

“That kid who maybe

doesn’t love baseball or football

but wants to have more of a

A busy time for city legislators

conversations with my own police

officers in Peabody,” he said.

“Something that is a small thing in

the whole scheme of things is just

another tool that may help some

people.”

Walsh is also sponsoring or

co-sponsoring bills to require critical

incident drills in public schools

and prevent deceptive calling

practices by the telemarketing industry.

Financial planning is

more important than ever…

• Detailed Life Planning

• Education Plans

• Longevity Planning

• Legacy & Estate Planning

• Investment Management

PHOTO | JANE CARTER

team atmosphere, a lot of times

they gravitate towards (fencing),”

she added.

Tanner City Fencing Club

meets at Higgins Middle School

on Tuesday and Thursday from

7-9 p.m. during the school year

and 5:30-7:30 p.m. during the

summer.

The club is open to fencers

ages 7 and up. Beginners to

competitive fencers are welcome

— no prior experience

necessary.

“I love it. I’ve been doing it

for 41 years,” Carter said. “It’s

part of my life at this point.”

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© 2021 Raymond James & Associates, Inc., member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC. 21-BRNAO-0003 TA 1/21


8

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 27, 2021

Memorial Day events scheduled for Monday

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Don Almeida, vice commander of the VFW in Peabody, carries a bundle of American flags on May 15th as he prepared to place them at the graves of veterans at

Cedar Grove Cemetery in preparation for Memorial Day. The Memorial Day remembrance will be held on Monday, May 31 at 10 a.m. at Cedar Grove followed

by the 11:30 a.m. remembrance in front of City Hall, 27 Lowell St.

STUDENT OF

THE WEEK

By Daniel Kane

PEABODY — This week's

student of the week has already

started to settle into high school

nicely after just one year at St.

Mary's in Lynn.

"It's been a great year as a

freshman," Kyle Rush said. "The

whole community at St. Mary's

is great and welcoming."

Rush moved to St. Mary's after

attending St. John the Baptist

School for most of his life. While

life as a Spartan has brought on

many new experiences, Kyle

was fortunate to be able to attend

his freshman year fully in person

He fits right in at St. Mary’s

despite the pandemic.

"We've been in school every

day since the first day of school

and haven't had any COVID

days," Rush said. "I think being

in school with a mask and

restrictions has been a lot better

than any other option. It was a

little different at the beginning

with all the new rules but after

some time you started to not

even notice them. And now

we’ve been able to start doing

more normal things."

In the classroom, Kyle is a

history buff where he and his

classmates have studied both

World Wars right up to the modern

day.

"History is my favorite subject,"

Rush said. "It's definitely

an interesting subject to study

what has happened in the world."

Algebra, biology, theology

and Spanish are also part of his

course load. He's also gotten the

chance to take on some interesting

electives in his first year.

"I took two electives this

year," Rush said. "The first was

accounting , which was very interesting.

It taught you what you

need to be an accountant, things

like liabilities and assets. Then

there was Intro to Engineering

and Design where we would use

a software called Onshape to

make a bunch of stuff and even

get the chance to 3D print some

things."

But the classroom isn't where

it stops for Kyle. Along with

some community service one of

his biggest passions is athletics

and he's definitely got a full plate

as an experienced basketball and

baseball player. Rush also joined

a very successful St. Mary's golf

program earlier this fall.

"It was my first year playing

competitive golf," Rush said. "I

wanted to try something new

instead of cross country which

is what I had done in the past. I

ended up being one of the top 10

or so golfers on the team most

matches."

St. Mary's, who was coming

off a string of which state championships,

also won the Catholic

Central League title once again

this year. While Kyle might not

have been one of the top five

players who participated just

yet, he soaked in as much as he

could.

"Being around those guys

was great," Rush said. "One of

big reasons I came to St. Mary's

was for sports. Obviously academics

always come first, but

I've always been an athlete. It's

already been a great experience

here with the people I’ve met.

There's a real competitive nature

that's been good to be a part of."

Have a story to share?

Need a question answered?

contactus@essexmedia.group


MAY 27, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 9

St. John’s

salutes 258

graduates

By Anne MArie ToBin

DANVERS — St. John’s

Preparatory School held its

111th Commencement exercises

last Saturday morning.

Headmaster Edward P.

Hardiman, Ph.D. conferred

diplomas upon 258 graduates

during an outdoor, socially-distanced

ceremony held on

Cronin Memorial Stadium’s

Glatz Field.

“There are no appropriate

words that could aptly capture

what each person in this stadium

has experienced since 2:45 pm

on March 12 of 2020 (due to

the Commonwealth’s state of

emergency declaration),” said

Dr. Hardiman, adding that the

class was the first since 1948 to

include students who started as

seventh graders.

“It would be foolhardy to attempt

to summarize this experience,

given that each of you has

endured this public health crisis

in different ways, with different

challenges and different outcomes,”

Dr. Hardiman said.

“While you each have different

gifts, talents and experiences,

you have made connections,

built bridges and overcome obstacles,

and you’ve done it beyond

just the last 435 days.

“It’s been an honor and a

privilege to learn with you

and from you throughout your

time here. Keep building, keep

dreaming, keep adapting, keep

learning and always remember

that you never walk alone. We

are always with you.”

Michael Maddison of

Lynnfield was the class

valedictorian.

In his address, Maddison

urged his classmates “to have

the courage to be yourself.”

He reflected on his belief that

all new graduates need to open

their hearts and their minds.

“Who we all are is a mysterious

mixture of the passions we

choose and the identities we are

born with,” said Maddison, who

graduated St. John’s with a 4.73

GPA and will attend Dartmouth

College.

“In my experience, many

passions … are generally accepted.

Identities are a bit

trickier, since some identities

are less accepted than others.

We are multifaceted, but we are

also completely in love with the

things that make up our personalities.

I leave you all with this:

Make use of (life’s) moments

— big and small — with everyone.

Our diversity is a gift.

Inclusivity is how we celebrate

it.”

Fifty-two percent of the graduates

were members of the

National Honor Society, while

nine earned commendation as

National Merit Scholars. A remarkable

37 Eagles student

athletes signed national letters

of intent to continue their sports

careers in college.

This year’s seniors represented

44 cities and towns

across the Commonwealth, including

as far south as Brighton,

as far west as Westford, and

as far north as Newburyport.

There were seven international

students.

Family was a prominent

theme, as there were 28 legacy

graduates and many others with

familial connections.

“My son, Jack, graduated

here in 2017, my son, Thomas,

received his diploma today,

and my nephew will graduate

next year,” said Brenda Ligh

of Peabody. “This has been a

tremendously difficult time for

so many more people than just

those in this school community,

but having an opportunity

to come together and share in

these graduates’ experience

as they close one chapter and

begin another is something that

I think we all cherish, especially

because there was no guarantee

an in-person graduation would

ever happen.”

Marblehead’s Sean Heffernan

and Lynnfield’s Andrew

Vittiglio received Loyalty and

Service awards during a virtual

Senior Awards ceremony

held earlier this month. Salem’s

Noah Thomas received the

Paul “Buster” DiVincenzo ‘50

Athletic Director’s Award.

Peabody’s Nicholas Fursey

received the Sean Lynch ‘85

Scholarship Award, while

Maddison received a Stephen

J. Kiely ’68 Scholarship Award.

The top 5 percent of the senior

class in academic performance

(in addition to Maddison)

included Nolan Adam of

Marblehead and Mark Zolott

of Swampscott. At Friday’s

Baccalaureate Liturgy, Adam

was recognized with a Campus

Ministry Award.

St. John’s Prep will hold a

limited-admission eighth-grade

promotion ceremony for the

Class of 2025 on June 3. The

event will serve to recognize the

class’s 113 students’ resilience,

leadership and focus throughout

this school year as well as

honor individual and collective

achievements.

COURTESY PHOTO | ST. JOHN’S PREP

Members of the Class of 2021 face the flag during the national anthem prior to the 111th St.

John’s Prep Commencement on Saturday at Cronin Memorial Stadium on the school’s campus.

MEMORIAL DAY CELEBRATION

MONDAY, MAY 31

PRICES ARE NOT MISPRINTS!

APPETIZERS

• Stuffed grape leaves

• Potato skins

• Meatballs marinara

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• Marinated steak tips

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• Baked haddock (topped

with house bread crumbs)

• Baked stuffed shrimp

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• Fried chicken plate

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10

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 27, 2021

Sports

FILE PHOTO | JULIA HOPKINS

Juan Tolentino went 4-for-6 with four RBI for Peabody in a win

over Winthrop.

Tanners notch big win

over NEC foe Winthrop

BASEBALL

By Mike Alongi

The Peabody baseball

team couldn’t stop hitting on

Wednesday afternoon, rolling

to a 20-9 win over Northeastern

Conference foe Winthrop on

the road at Little League Field.

Three Tanners combined for

an impressive 11 RBI in the

victory, with Juan Tolentino

having the biggest day after

going 4-for-6 with four RBI.

Cam Cuzzi went 2-for-3

with four RBI and four runs

scored, while Ryan Knight

had a 3-for-3 day with three

RBI and two runs scored. Nick

Villano (3-for-6) and Giovani

Guglielmo (3-for-4) each

added three hits and three runs

scored in the win.

On the mound, it was Dom

Annese who picked up the

victory. Annese pitched four

scoreless innings, allowing

just one hit and notching six

strikeouts.

Peabody (5-3) plays on the

road at Salem Friday afternoon

(4).

PHOTO | JULIA HOPKINS

Peabody’s Abby Bettencourt struck out nine batters to earn the victory over Marblehead

Wednesday.

Peabody holds on to beat

Marblehead in NEC battle

FILE PHOTO | JULIA HOPKINS

Christian Loescher had a huge day on the mound and at the

plate in a win over Bishop Feehan Sunday.

Fenwick splits pair of

games over the weekend

BASEBALL

By Mike Alongi

The Bishop Fenwick baseball

team had a busy weekend,

splitting a pair of Catholic

Central League games against

a pair of quality opponents.

After falling to Bishop Stang

8-2 on Saturday, the Crusaders

followed it up with a key 8-1

win over a strong Bishop

Feehan team on Sunday.

The star of Sunday’s game

was Christian Loescher, who

earned the win on the mound

after tossing 6 1/3 innings and

allowing just one run on one

hit with two strikeouts. He also

contributed heavily at the plate,

going 2-for-3 with three RBI.

Also performing well in

Sunday’s win were Scott

Emerson (2-for-2, two RBI),

Dan Reddick (1-for-3, two

RBI) and Alex Gonzalez (3-

for-3, three runs scored).

On Saturday, Gonzalez paced

the offense after going 1-for-4

with two RBI. Anthony Marino

took the loss on the mound

after pitching 4 1/3 innings and

five runs (one earned) on four

hits with five strikeouts.

Fenwick (6-4) has nearly a

full week off before traveling

to Winthrop for a doubleheader

on Saturday (10 and 2).

SOFTBALL

By Daniel Kane

MARBLEHEAD —

Wednesday’s game between the

Peabody and Marblehead softball

teams was as tight as they

come, but in the end the Tanners

scored the lone run to earn the

1-0 road victory and stay unbeaten

on the year.

“It definitely could have

gone either way (Wednesday),”

Peabody coach Tawny Palmieri

said. “We always know that

Marblehead gives us a good

game every time. These two

teams are always putting together

that type of game. We had

to be ready and we had to be the

team that came out getting that

one run.”

That run came early in the

second, when a Marblehead

error put Logan Lomasney at

first base. Lomasney stole a pair

of bases and Michaela Bonfanti

laced a single up the middle to

earn the game’s only RBI.

“The bottom of the order

did really well,” Palmieri said.

“They executed when they

needed to and manufactured

things when we needed to and

that was great to see.”

Emma Bloom and Penny

Spack each went 2-for-4 at the

plate, while Kiley Doolin was

1-for-2 with a walk.

But the real star was Peabody’s

defense. Abby Bettencourt

pitched well once again with

nine strikeouts. Between her

and a solid Peabody defense,

the Tanners got out of any jams

Marblehead forced them into.

“Abby’s pitching is unbelievable

because when you need

her to get that third out, she gets

it done,” Palmieri said. “You

couldn’t ask for anything more.

The defense behind her was

solid though. Everybody was

picking each other up and it was

an all-around solid performance

by both teams.”

Marblehead also had plenty

of defensive highlights, but

stranded a few too many baserunners

to even the score

throughout the day. Pitcher

Lauren Donovan had eight

strikeouts, with Peabody’s only

run going unearned.

“(Peabody) made no mistakes

defensively,” Marblehead coach

Johnny Gold said. “We made a

few. We have some young kids

in new places, but no excuses.

(Donovan) has done unbelievable

all year. She did what

she does and she got us out of

trouble. We left eight runners on

and that hurts. We have to learn

to produce.”

But the Magicians didn’t

have many chances to produce

anything in the early going.

Bettencourt struck out a pair

of batters in two of the first

three innings to help silence the

Marblehead bats.

After Lomasney and

Bonfanti put the Tanners on top,

Marblehead had multiple runners

on base in the fourth, fifth

and sixth innings, but struggled

to slip that extra hit through

Peabody’s defense.

In the seventh, Leila Walton

reached on a single and moved

to second after a sac bunt from

Dylan Kerble. But Peabody shut

the door with a strikeout from

Bettencourt and a forced fly ball

putout to secure the win.


MAY 27, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 11

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Peabody’s Keenan Madden scored two goals for the Tanners in a loss to Marblehead Saturday

afternoon.

Marblehead outlasts Peabody

in battle of NEC unbeatens

BOYS LACROSSE

By Mike Alongi

PEABODY — The

Marblehead lacrosse team

put together the right game

plan and executed it to the

fullest on Saturday, notching

a 13-6 win over Northeastern

Conference foe Peabody in a

battle of previously undefeated

teams at Coley Lee Field. The

Magicians had to withstand

a couple of rallies from the

Tanners, but a string of five

unanswered goals at the end of

the third and beginning of the

fourth quarter sealed the deal.

A key part of the game plan

for Marblehead was shutting

down high-scoring Peabody

attack Jack Houlden -- the

top goal scorer in the North

Shore entering the game.

The Magicians did just that,

keeping Houlden to just one

goal on the day.

“A lot of their stuff runs

through Houlden, and he’s a

great ballplayer who can shoot

the lights out,” said Wilkens.

“It was a tough game and I’m

proud of the way our guys dug

down deep on a hot day and

pulled out the win.”

“We expected the heavy eyes

on Jack, but the bottom line is

that we just didn’t execute out

there,” said Peabody coach Leo

Shidler. “Credit to Marblehead,

they came with the right game

plan and they played well all

day.”

Will Shull led the way with

four goals in the victory, while

Matt Thompson scored three

goals. Josh Robertson and

Mark Paquette each added two

goals. Connor Cronin had one

goal and two assists, while

Carter Laramie had one goal

and one assist.

But a big part of the story

was Marblehead goalie J.T.

Monahan, who made 12 saves

against a normally highscoring

Peabody team.

“J.T. is tough and he’s a

great goaltender, and I think

he’s very underrated,” said

Wilkens. “He’s a gamer. He’s

a great three-sport athlete, a

true leader and the guys love

playing in front of him.”

For the Tanners, Cam Collins

and Keenan Madden each

scored two goals. Anthony

Bettencourt had one goal and

one assist, while Houlden

scored one goal. Drew Lucas

and Luke Buckley each added

one assist, while goalie Derek

Patturelli made eight saves.

“We had some really

good looks (Saturday), but

Marblehead is solid all around

and there’s nothing we could

really attack,” said Shidler.

“We needed to play a perfect

game, and we were anything

but that in this one.”

It was a back-and-forth affair

to start, with Shull getting

Marblehead on the board

less than three minutes into

the game to take a 1-0 lead.

Peabody responded three

minutes later when Lucas hit

Bettencourt for a goal to tie it

at 1-1, but a quick strike from

Thompson gave the Magicians

a 2-1 lead at the end of the first

quarter.

Marblehead stretched its

lead to 4-1 in the second

thanks to one goal each from

Shull and Robertson, but then

the Tanners notched two goals

in a 22-second span to all of a

sudden make it a 4-3 game.

But a defensive breakdown

by Peabody with about four

minutes to go led to a breakaway

goal for Thompson, and

the Magicians were able to

add two more goals in the final

three minutes to take a 7-3 lead

into halftime.

After Marblehead opened

the third quarter with a goal

from Paquette, Peabody scored

back-to-back goals and appeared

to be making another

run. But then, behind a run of

five unanswered goals in a span

of 12 minutes, Marblehead

took control of the game and

cruised to a victory.

“Lacrosse is a game of runs,

and it was a good sign that

our guys didn’t ever pack it

in and they never let up,” said

Wilkens.

Peabody (6-1) will try to

get back to its winning ways

Thursday (5) against Danvers.

“The boys will learn from

this one, because a lot of them

have never played in a big

game like this,” said Shidler.

“We can learn from a lot of

things in this game, and I know

they’ll be itching for another

crack at these guys at the end

of the year.”

Marblehead (7-0) will try to

keep its unbeaten streak alive

Thursday afternoon (4) with a

road game against Saugus.

THURSDAY

Baseball

Lynnfield at Amesbury (3:45)

St. John’s Prep at Malden Catholic (4)

Boys Lacrosse

Peabody at Danvers (4)

Girls Lacrosse

Danvers at Peabody (4)

Track

Pentucket at Lynnfield (3:30)

FRIDAY

Baseball

Peabody at Salem (4)

Softball

Lynnfield at Ipswich (3:45)

Peabody at Danvers (4)

Boys Lacrosse

Newburyport at Lynnfield (3:45)

Girls Lacrosse

Lynnfield at Newburyport (5:15)

Boys Tennis

Lynnfield at Ipswich (4:30)

Girls Tennis

Ipswich at Lynnfield (4:30)

SATURDAY

Baseball

Ipswich at Lynnfield (10)

Bishop Fenwick at Winthrop (10 & 2)

Boys Tennis

Bishop Feehan at Bishop Fenwick (2)

Girls Tennis

Bishop Fenwick at Bishop Feehan (2)

MONDAY

Baseball

Bishop Fenwick at Essex Tech (10)

St. John’s Prep at Xaverian (4)

Peabody at Saugus (4)

HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS SCHEDULE

Softball

Lynnfield at Triton (11)

Swampscott at Peabody (4)

Boys Lacrosse

Lynnfield at Amesbury (10)

Bishop Fenwick at Matignon (TBD)

Boys Tennis

Amesbury at Lynnfield (10)

Girls Tennis

Lynnfield at Amesbury (11)

TUESDAY

Baseball

Bishop Fenwick at St. Joseph’s Prep (3:30)

Triton at Lynnfield (3:45)

Softball

St. Joseph’s Prep at Bishop Fenwick (4)

Gloucester at Peabody (4:30)

Boys Lacrosse

Ipswitch at Lynnfield (4)

Bishop Feehan at Bishop Fenwick (4)

Peabody at Beverly (4)

Girls Lacrosse

Bishop Fenwick at St. Joseph’s Prep (4)

Beverly at Peabody (4)

Lynnfield at Ipswich (4:30)

Boys Tennis

Bishop Fenwick at St. Mary’s (3:30)

Girls Tennis

Bishop Fenwick at Austin Prep (3:30)

MONDAY

Baseball

Peabody at Danvers (4)

Boys Tennis

Bishop Fenwick at Austin Prep (3:30)

Girls Tennis

Arlington Catholic at Bishop Fenwick (3:30)

Winthrop at Peabody (4)

Track

Peabody at Swampscott (4)

Fenwick falls short

against St. Mary’s

BOYS LACROSSE

By Daniel Kane

PEABODY — An eight-goal

second half was the difference

for the St. Mary’s boys lacrosse

team Monday in an 11-8 win

over rival Bishop Fenwick on

the road at Donaldson Stadium.

It didn’t always look good

for the Spartans in a back-andforth

Catholic Central League

bout, but after going down 7-6

early in the fourth quarter, St.

Mary’s flipped a switch and

took things over.

Despite the loss, Fenwick

had its fair share of leads and

opportunities but struggled to

sustain momentum.

“They gave us a ton of opportunities

but unfortunately

we had a lot of unforced errors

and possession where we

just could not capitalize on the

stuff that we’re supposed to,”

Fenwick coach Steve Driscoll

said. “Ground balls win games.

If you can’t pick up a ground

ball, you can’t win the game.

That’s definitely something

that we need to focus on.”

Liam Hill led the way

2 Large

Cheese Pizzas

$15.99

Open for take-out

and delivery

once again for the Crusaders

with five goals, while Aiden

Anthony also stepped up with

three goals.

“Aiden really stepped up,”

Driscoll said. “He’s had a bum

ankle which has been hurting

him this season. It’s been hard

for him to get in motion. The

last couple games he’s really

started to put things together

and push it. It’s been great to

have him and it will help us

down the stretch having him

and Liam working together.”

Both teams traded goals in

the first half, but Fenwick took

a 4-3 lead into the halftime

break.

The Crusaders bumped their

lead up to two in the third, but

Jackson Field followed with

a pair of goals and another by

Barden put St. Mary’s ahead

6-5.

Hill gave Fenwick its final

push with a pair of goals next

to take back the lead, but St.

Mary’s didn’t look back from

there.

Both teams have some time

off before returning to the field.

Fenwick (3-4) is at Matignon

Monday (TBD).


12

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 27, 2021

PHOTO | JULIA HOPKINS

From left, Hanna Johnson, Sophie Izzo, Lily Bromberger, Olivia Barrete, Amber Kiricoples, Cade Buckley, Colby Browne, and Aidan Dwyer are the recipients of

the 2021 Joseph O’ Boyle Memorial Scholarship Fund from Salem Country Club. Co-Chairman Steve Richards, center, presented the eight scholars with awards.

See more photos on page 13.

Teeing up honors for students

By Anne MArie ToBin

PEABODY — There may

not have been golf, but there

were smiles all around at Salem

Country Club Monday as the

club celebrated its 27th annual

Peabody Golf Day.

Eight high-school seniors

were honored as 2021 Joseph

O’ Boyle Memorial Scholarship

Fund scholars.

“We were impressed by the

number of applications, and it’s

a tough decision, as always,”

said Memorial Scholarship

Fund Co-chairman and member

Steve Richards. “These students

are so talented and they

have worked so hard, so this is

our opportunity to give back.”

In normal times, the event,

now in its 27th year, includes

a double-shotgun golf tournament

open to residents and employees

of the City of Peabody,

with proceeds used to fund the

scholarships.

But these are not normal

times.

“We were disappointed that

golf had to be canceled again,

but we still wanted to be able

to support and honor the kids,”

said Richards. “We wish all of

them the best knowing they are

very well-equipped to succeed.

They will make their families,

the city of Peabody, and Salem

C.C. very proud.”

The scholarships are for

college-bound seniors who

reside in Peabody, attend either

Peabody High or Bishop

Fenwick and have excelled in

leadership, athletics, academics

and community service. A

total of $30,000 was awarded,

bringing the total to more than

$400,000 awarded in the fund’s

history.

This year’s scholars are

Peabody High’s Olivia Barrete,

Lily Bromberger, Sophie Izzo

and Amber Kiricoples, and

Fenwick’s Colby Browne, Cade

Buckley, Aidan Dwyer and

Hannah Johnson.

Barrete is a top-five ranked

student and vice president of the

National Honor Society (NHS).

A member of the Massachusetts

DECA executive board, she

competed in community service,

entrepreneurship and innovation

categories at the state

level.

She tutored math, played

volleyball, ran indoor track

and has supported the Big

Buddies program. She will attend

Northeastern University,

majoring in mathematics and

business administration.

“I am incredibly honored

to receive this scholarship,”

Barrete said. “This will make

a huge difference in paying for

my college education.”

Bromberger, also a top-five

student, will attend Worcester

Polytechnic Institute, where she

plans to major in engineering.

She was on the swim and field

hockey teams, played in the

school band and was part of the

Youth Advisory Council. She

was a member of the Air Force

Junior ROTC and volunteered

at Haven From Hunger.

Johnson, another top student,

has actively volunteered

with the Jimmy Fund, helping

to create the fund’s “Back to

School” video. The video helps

cancer patients adjust to going

back to school and also helps

support administrators on how

to successfully acclimate patients

back into the school

environment.

Johnson is also active with

“Teen Chats,” a program that

discusses multiple topics that

teens may be dealing with as

they go through treatment.

Johnson, peer mentor, leader

and member of the volleyball

team, will study nursing at

Emmanuel College.

Browne will attend High

Point University and major in

business administration. He

played football, basketball, ran

track and was active in student

government. He was involved

with the Best Buddies program

and was active in several school

fund-raising events.

Izzo played four years of varsity

lacrosse and field hockey.

She was a member of the Ski

Club, National Honor Society

and the International Club, and

plans to major in health sciences

at the University of Vermont.

Kiricoples, co-president of

the senior class, will attend

Bentley University and play

soccer. She is a member of the

National Honor Society, threesport

captain in soccer, basketball,

and lacrosse, and was

named the 2020 Essex Media

Group Person of the Year for

Peabody. For the latter, she was

recognized for conducting numerous

community events to

raise awareness of the importance

of mental health. She has

also been an active participant

on the Student Youth Advisory

Council.

Buckley will attend St.

Joseph’s College in Maine

where he plans to major in

business administration/sports

management and play on

the golf team. The four-year

member of the Crusaders’ golf

team has also played basketball

during his high school career.

Buckley’s community service

includes volunteering with the

Stock Club and My Brother’s

Table, a soup kitchen in Lynn.

Dwyer will attend Xavier

University where he plans to

major in business administration.

The three-sport captain (indoor

and outdoor track, soccer),

has earned Central Catholic

Conference All-Star honors in

soccer. This spring, he joined

the football team as a placekicker.

He volunteered with St.

John the Baptist, Best Buddies,

Fenwick’s Good Friday Walk,

and the Dominican Republic

Mission Trip to the Caribbean.

For Browne, being named an

O’Boyle scholar speaks volumes

about the club’s commitment

to the city.

“I really appreciate the award,

but it goes beyond the money,”

Browne said. “I grew up in

Peabody schools before going

to Fenwick. We always talk

about the meaning of Peabody

pride. That’s what this is and I

am grateful.”


MAY 27, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 13

Teeing up honors for students

PHOTOS | Julia Hopkins

From left, Bishop Fenwick students Hanna Johnson, Cade

Buckley, Aidan Dwyer, and Colby Browne are the recipients

of the 2021 Joseph O’ Boyle Memorial Scholarship Fund from

Salem Country Club.

Byron Mahoney presents Amber Kiricoples with the 2021 Joseph O’ Boyle Memorial Scholarship

Fund.

Families and students of the eight recepients of 2021 Joseph O’ Boyle Memorial Scholarship

Fund gather for the reception at Salem Country Club.

Sophie Izzo is accompanied by family to receive the 2021 Joseph

O’ Boyle Memorial Scholarship.

Olivia Barrete is accompanied by family to receive the 2021 Joseph O’ Boyle Memorial

Scholarship

Looking for past issues?

Find them on weeklynews.net


14

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 27, 2021

LYNNFIELD

31 OXBOW RD

$1,340,000

B: Cam K Tewsbury-Welch & Kevin M

Welch

S: Geoffrey W Martin & Nikki K Martin

PEABODY

13 BEACON ST

$259,500

B: Cynthia M Mavroules

S: Dugar Janice A Est & Robert N

Dugar

9 CLEMENT AVE

$450,000

B: Sean C Haidaczuk

S: Kenneth J Kolodziej Tr, Tr for Clement

Avenue RT

52 CLEMENT AVE

$460,000

B: Bridget V Rosario & Nardo J Rosario

S: Scott A Omalley & Stacie A Omalley

8 DARK LN

$552,500

B: Daniela O Anjos

S: Victor B Lima Tr, Tr for 8 Dark Lane

Peabody NT

8 GREENWOOD RD

$500,000

REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS THIS WEEK

B: Linda J Stansbury

Shore Road RT

S: Barbara C Amato

4905 HEATHERWOOD LN U:4905

$507,000

B: Jayne Gordon Tr, Tr for Jane Gordon

FT

S: Marcia E Poretsky Tr, Tr for MEP T

5 KARELITZ RD U:B

$515,000

B: Taras Kucherenko

S: Karen M Oldoni Tr, Tr for Olde RT

67 LAKESHORE RD

$530,000

B: Jonathan Eisner & Lisa Rudden

S: Paul W Levasseur Tr, Tr for 67 Lake

182 NEWBURY ST

$970,000

B: Shawn Sardina Tr, Tr for M&E King

FT

S: John E Coughlin Tr, Tr for Gateway

2 T

11 PERLEY AVE

$612,000

B: Sabrina J Demerino & Jose A

Merino-Guerrero

S: Tina Carpenito

13 REED RD

$460,000

B: Altin Halo

S: Jeanne M Taylor

41 REED RD

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B: Ryan Tully

S: James P Canavan

10 TANNERS RIDGE RD

$989,000

B: Brandon Dervishian & Shannon

Mcinnis

S: Heritage Pines LLC

6 WALKER RD

$635,000

B: Kledion Tare & Marsida Tare

S: Luis F Pereira Tr, Tr for Luis F Pereira

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Legal Notice

There will be a Tree Removal Hearing on Friday June 4, 2021 @ 8:30am at the

Recreation, Parks & Forestry Department office located at 50 Farm Avenue,

Peabody, MA, for the removal of a Public Shade Tree(s) at the following

location(s).

Address: 35 Rockdale Ave

Peabody, MA 01960

CITY OF PEABODY

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING CHAPTER 19 ENTITLED

MOTOR VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC OF THE CODE

OF THE CITY OF PEABODY

SECTION ONE: That the Code of the City of Peabody adopted on January 9, 1986,

and amended, is hereby further amended:

That Section 19-126. Obedience To Isolated Stop Signs be amended as follows:

By adding the following isolated stop sign:

Marshall Circle, southeastbound at Gedney Drive

Pzegeo Circle, northbound at Gedney Drive

Conaxis Circle, southwestbound at Tsitsinos Drive

Vieira Drive, northeastbound at Tsitsinos Drive

Sunset Road, northeastbound at Vieira Drive

Manuel Drive, northwestbound at Tsitsinos Drive

Manuel Drive, southeastbound at Vieira Drive

SECTION TWO: All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent herewith

are hereby repealed.

SECTION THREE: This ordinance shall take effect on January 1, 2020 as provided

by law.

INTRODUCED MARCH 25, 2021

ORDERED PUBLISHED MARCH 25, 2021

PUBLISHED APRIL 30, 2021

ADOPTED MAY 13, 2021

PUBLICATION OF ADOPTION MAY 27, 2021

Weekly News: May 27, 2021

Weekly News: May 20, 27, 2021

CITY OF PEABODY

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING SECTION 19-81

"PARKING PROHIBITED - HANDICAP ZONE"

OF THE CODE OF THE CITY OF PEABODY

BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF PEABODY AS

FOLLOWS:

SECTION ONE: The Code of the City of Peabody adopted on January 9, 1986,

and amended, is hereby further amended as follows:

Section 19-81 entitled "Parking Prohibited, Handicapped Zone"

of the Code of the City of Peabody, Massachusetts, is hereby amended by

inserting therein the following:

One handicap parking space in front of and along the property line of 95 Lynn

Street

SECTION TWO: All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent herewith are

hereby repealed.

SECTION THREE: This ordinance shall take effect as provided by law.

INTRODUCED MAY 13, 2021

ORDERED PUBLISHED MAY 13, 2021

PUBLISHED MAY 27, 2021

Weekly News: May 27, 2021

LEGALS

As per the petition of (Karen Gauthier)

Per Order of Brian Grant, Tree Warden

Notice is hereby given by Four Star

Service Inc. 134 Newbury St. Rear Unit

R.U.B. Peabody, Ma 01960 that on

Friday May 28, 2021 at 11a.m., a sale

will be conducted for the following

vehicles to satisfy the garage lien,

thereon for the storage, towing

charges, care and expenses of notice

& sale of said vehicle:

2014 Chrysler 200

VIN: 1C3CCBBG3EN113871

Reg: N/A

Owner: Richard Ferrier

78 Central Ave Unit 308

Lynn MA 01901

2009 Nissan Altima

VIN: 1N4BL21E09N530125

Reg: 4022564 NH

Owner: Debra Farmer

10 Circlefield Dr

Nashua NH 03062

2009 Cadillac Escalade

VIN: 1GYFK43519R218941

Reg: 4387076 NH

Owner: Kevonte Evans

19 Washington Way

Durham NH 03824

2008 Buick Lucerne

VIN: 1G4HE57Y270189214

Reg: 4676674 NH

Owner: Karen Plante

10 Chapel St #4

Newmarket NH 03857

Weekly News: May 13, 20 and 27,

2021

Legal Notice

There will be a Tree Removal Hearing on Friday June 4, 2021 @ 9:00am at the

Recreation, Parks & Forestry Department office located at 50 Farm Avenue,

Peabody, MA, for the removal of a Public Shade Tree(s) at the following

location(s).

Address: 61 Newcastle Road

Peabody, MA 01960

Weekly News: may 20, 7, 2021

Legal Notice

There will be a Tree Removal Hearing on Tuesday June 8, 2021 @ 1:30pm at

the Recreation, Parks & Forestry Department office located at 50 Farm Avenue,

Peabody, MA, for the removal of a Public Shade Tree(s) at the following

location(s).

Address: 18 Benevento Circle (2 Trees)

Peabody, MA 01960

As per the petition of (Debra MacGregor)

Weekly News: May 20, 27, 2021

LEGALS

Per Order of Brian Grant, Tree Warden

As per the petition of (Mark Lausier)

Per Order of Brian Grant, Tree Warden

Legal Notice

There will be a Tree Removal Hearing on Tuesday June 8, 2021 @ 1:00pm at

the Recreation, Parks & Forestry Department office located at 50 Farm Avenue,

Peabody, MA, for the removal of a Public Shade Tree(s) at the following

location(s).

Address: 1 Southside Ave As per the petition of (Richard Sullivan)

Peabody, MA 01960

Per Order of Brian Grant, Tree Warden

Weekly News: May 20, 27, 2021

RELOCATING?

“Helpful tips”

for a S-M-O-O-T-H

trouble-free move!

Designate a drawer for

essentials such as

sheets and towels for

quick access the first

night you move into

your new home.

Plan a garage/yard

sale before you move.

Fresh coffee, baking

soda, or charcoal in a

sock, placed inside

your refrigerator will

keep the inside smelling

fresh and clean.

Pack your current

phone book — it’s a

quick easy reference to

the folks back home.


MAY 27, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 15

Peabody falls to Marblehead lacrosse

PHOTOS | Spenser Hasak

Peabody’s John Lucas knocks over Marblehead’s Will Shull as they fight for a loose ball.

Peabody’s Keenan Madden works his way to the net.

Marblehead’s Sam Annese attempts to block the ball as Peabody’s Cameron Collins passes

the ball.

Peabody’s Nicholas Salvati, left, passes the ball to teammate.

Peabody’s Jack Houlden works his way around Marblehead’s Remy Poisson as he heads to the net.


16

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 27, 2021

GREAT TIME TO SELL!

Inventory is Low and Demand is High!

S O L D

P E N D I N G

P E N D I N G

5 JUNIPER ROAD

LYNNFIELD, MA

$929,000

7 CANDLEWOOD ROAD

LYNNFIELD, MA

$1,199,000

52 COLBURN ROAD

READING, MA

$1,479,000

S O L D

24 WILDEWOOD DRIVE

LYNNFIELD, MA

$1,850,000

P E N D I N G

P E N D I N G

400 BROADWAY

LYNNFIELD, MA

$729,000

F O R S A L E S O L D

F O R S A L E

5 WILLIS LANE

LYNNFIELD, MA

$1,100,000

42 LEDGE ROAD

LYNNFIELD, MA

$799,000

121 PORTLAND STREET, UNIT 303

BOSTON, MA

Listed at $949,900

121 PORTLAND STREET UNIT 906

BOSTON, MA

Listed at $1,199,999

P E N D I N G

#1 COLDWELL BANKER REALTY

Multimillion-Dollar Agent in Lynnfield

for the past 20 years!

GLOUCESTER, MA

23 WYOMA ROAD

$3,195,000

International President’s Elite Award

REAL Trends America’s Best Agents

617.605.0555

louise.touchette@NEmoves.com

louisetouchette.com

Certified Luxury Home Marketing Specialist TM

Million Dollar Guild TM

The property information herein is derived from various sources that may include, but not be limited to, county records and may include approximations. Although the

information is believed to be accurate, it is not warranted and you should not rely upon it without personal verifi cation. Affi liated real estate agents are independent

contractor sales associates, not employees. ©2021 Coldwell Banker. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker and the Coldwell Banker logos are trademarks of Coldwell

Banker Real Estate LLC. The Coldwell Banker® System is comprised of company owned offi ces which are owned by a subsidiary of Realogy Brokerage Group LLC

and franchised offi ces which are independently owned and operated. The Coldwell Banker System fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal

Opportunity Act. 21H9F4-DC_NE_4/21

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