17.06.2022 Views

PWN061622

You also want an ePaper? Increase the reach of your titles

YUMPU automatically turns print PDFs into web optimized ePapers that Google loves.

The #1 Selling Real

Estate Brokerage in

Peabody*

*MLS PIN 1/1/21 - 12/31/2021

FOR SALE!

LET’S FIND YOUR

PERFECT HOME

LYNNFIELD

$1,499,000

Rossetti/Poti Team

781-718-4662

WOBURN, MA

PERMIT #168

PAID

U.S. POSTAGE

ECRWSSEDDM

PRSRT STD

WATERFRONT MINT

CONDITION FOR SALE

SWAMPSCOTT

$1,475,000

Debbie Caniff

617-771-2827

Under Agreement in less

than a week

PEABODY

Evelyn Rockas

617-256-8500

Gale Rawding

617-784-9995

LYNNFIELD

$1,375,000

Louise

Bova-Touchette

617-605-0555

PEABODY

WEEKLY NEWS

SOLD

JUNE 16, 2022 • VOL. 60, NO. 75

SERVING THE COMMUNITY SINCE 1957

16 PAGES • ONE DOLLAR

O’Shea underway

By Charlie MCKenna

Entrants into the former

O’Shea Mansion on Washington

Street — where work

is underway to convert the

155-year-old property into a

bed-and-breakfast complete

with a speakeasy, indoor and

outdoor dining, and eight hotel

rooms — will be greeted by

a glass floor, letting them peer

into the live music playing in

the speakeasy below their feet.

It’s these modern touches

that developer Ed Greeley,

who bought the property

in late December 2021 for

$751,000, along with two

others on Washington Street,

says will make The Bell Estate

stand out.

“It’ll be little things like

that,” he said. “You don’t typically

see things like that.”

Since Greeley bought the

property, he and his team have

worked to renovate the historic

building, infusing modern

touches while taking care to

preserve its history, which has

roots as far back as the

O’SHEA, PAGE 3

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Workers are busy giving the 155-year-old O’Shea Mansion a new lease on life as a

bed-and-breakfast. More photos page 13.

Welch School

work ready

to begin

By anne Marie ToBin

After many years of hopeful planning,

the construction phase of the William A.

Welch Elementary School renovation

project is about to begin.

Local elected officials, members of

the school community, and invited guests

stood by proudly as the city broke ground

on the $30 million project last week.

“Today is a wonderful day – the weather

is perfect, and we’re ready to mark the

beginning of a new chapter for the Welch

Elementary School,” said Welch School

Building Committee Chair Beverley

Griffin Dunne. “The Welch School Project

is designed to give a new life to the

building behind us, but most importantly

to allow this building to continue on in

providing a safe, nurturing environment

to the children of Peabody.”

Dunne said that 60 percent of the cost

will be reimbursed by the Massachusetts

School Building Authority (MSBA). The

project includes updated classrooms, a

larger library, a new main entrance, a redesigned

nurse’s office, enhanced

WELCH, PAGE 2

The #1 Selling Real

Estate Brokerage in

Peabody*

*MLS PIN 1/1/21 - 12/31/2021

Thinking of Selling?

Elaine is an experienced

REALTOR® that will

guide you every step

of the way for optimal

results.Call today!

Elaine Figliola

781-910-6454

NEW LISTING! FOR SALE SOLD SOLD

WEST PEABODY

$1,699,900

Joyce Cucchiara

978-808-1597

MANCHESTER

BY-THE-SEA

$3,100,000

Denise Moynihan

781-872-1200

LYNNFIELD

$1,285,000

Louise

Bova-Touchette

617-605-0555

NORTH READING

Evelyn Rockas

617-256-8500


2

WELCH

From page 1

City breaks ground

on Welch project

Pre-Schoolers

Love

Arts Martial

Fun, Games,

Adventure

and the first steps

toward:

CONFIDENCE

SELF -ESTEEM

AND DISCIPLINE

FREE INTRODUCTORY

COURSE

FREE UNIFORM

with enrollment

Route 1 South, Newbury Street, Peabody,

MA 01960

BRUCE MCCORRY’S

978-535-7878

Visit our website for more about us!

MARTIAL ARTS Est. 1978

www.brucemccorry.com

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 781-593-7700 JUNE 16, 2022

COURTESY PHOTO | BEVERLEY GRIFFIN DUNNE

City officials and elected leaders dig in at the Welch School

ground breaking.

security and new windows, air

conditioning and ventilation, and

HVAC systems. Construction is

scheduled to start this summer

with completion expected by the

fall of 2024.

The project’s architect is Boston-based

DiNisco Design Inc.;

the project manager is Dore +

Whittier of Newburyport, and

the construction manager is Milton-based

Consigli Construction.

“Thank you all for working so

hard on this project, for working

for so many years to make this

possible,” Dunne said.

Mayor Edward A. Bettencourt,

Jr. echoed Dunne’s words, saying

the project has been something

the city has worked on for a “very

long time. This is something that

brings a lot of happiness to all of

us. To have this moment makes

me think about all the people who

gave so much and made magic

happen here even during some difficult

and challenging moments.”

Among those in attendance

were State Sen. Joan B. Lovely,

State Reps. Tom Walsh and Sally

Kerans, Superintendent of schools

Dr. Josh Vadala, Welch Principal

Michelle Massa, City Council

President Ryan Melville, Ward 2

Councilor Peter McGinn, School

Committee member Jon Swanson

and MSBA Executive Director

Jack McCarthy. McCarthy said

the MSBA is “proud to be a part

of Peabody’s tomorrow.”

Several Welch students shared

their thoughts on what the project

means to them.

“I’m excited that in fifth grade

we will be in a brand new room

(and) we will be graduating from

a new school,” said second grade

student Priscyla. “Hopefully, the

new building doesn’t make anyone

confused. I think it’s going to

be a fantastic new building.”

Second grade student Mason,

said he is excited to be getting a

new cafeteria and new windows.

“Maybe we will get new food

too,” he said. “We are getting new

windows so that we can see better.

I can’t wait to see the seasons

change in my new classroom. Our

class would like to thank everyone

for making a great new school.”

Emily Sanon, a fourth grader,

said she is excited about having

air conditioning and safer playground

conditions.

“It could stop students from

sweating and complaining about

the heat (and) we will have a better

and safer playground that will

better fit everyone to play,” she

said.

Bettencourt said Dunne has

been a “strong advocate” for not

only the Welch School, but all city

schools.

Dunne, whose four children

attended Welch, said the school

opened its doors in 1973 and that

“once you’re a member of the

Welch School family, you’re part

of a pretty special group.” She

said that the school has a rich tradition

with many graduates going

on to enjoy successful careers in

the trades, business, and education.

“Welch School students have

gone on to do great things and to

give back to our community and

especially to education. That’s a

great tribute to the work that goes

on the building behind us, and

we’re very happy to be able to

give this building and the Welch

School family many more happy

years ahead. This school touches

the future, and will continue to do

so for many more generations.”

Bettencourt thanked Massa

and the Welch School staff and

students.

“You’ve all made the difference

and we are grateful to have

you,” he said. “It’s going to be

challenging these next couple of

years as we work through this

project. It’s going to be an uphill

project at times and I know it’s

going to put a lot on all of you, but

it’s going to be an outstanding result

when we are finished. I can’t

wait for the day when we are all

back here for the ribbon cutting,”

said Bettencourt.

We Specialize in

AFTER SCHOOL

MARTIAL ARTS

IT’S FUN! • IT’S EDUCATIONAL!

• IT’S AFFORDABLE

Our unique program will help your child:

Build confidence • Learn self-defense

Improve grades • Increase self-discipline

WE TRANSPORT

PMLP

conducting customer

satisfaction survey

From now through July 12,

the Peabody Municipal Light

Plant (PMLP) is conducting a

survey among its ratepayers in

Peabody and South Lynnfield.

The purpose of this survey

is to measure customer satisfaction

levels and opinions, as

well as identify opportunities to

improve PMLP moving forward.

The survey, available in both

English and Spanish, is being

conducted by GreatBlue Research,

Inc., a professional research

firm located in Glastonbury,

CT.

As required by the Code of

Ethics of the National Council

PMLP Hosts Energy

Awareness Forum

The Peabody Municipal

Light Plant (PMLP) will host its

Second Energy Awareness Forum

at 201 Warren St. Extension

on Tuesday, June 21 at 6 p.m.

PMLP Manager, Joseph Anastasi,

will present an overview

of PMLP’s activities in the community,

and provide insights on

the electric industry. Ratepayers

are also welcomed to ask questions.

on Public Polls and the United

States Privacy Act of 1974,

GreatBlue Research, Inc. maintains

the anonymity of respondents

to surveys the firm conducts.

No information will be

released that might, in any way,

reveal the identity of the respondent.

Customers of PMLP may

complete the survey at https://

tinyurl.com/PMLPCustomerSat.

The Peabody Municipal

Light Plant is the community

owned, not-for-profit utility

company serving the residents

of Peabody and South Lynnfield.

As the new manager at PMLP,

Anastasi introduced these quarterly

forums with a kick-off

meeting in March. For those

who cannot make an evening

meeting, the September meeting

will be held in the morning.

PMLP is the community

owned, not-for-profit utility

company serving the residents

of Peabody and South Lynnfield.

Looking for past issues?

Find them on weeklynews.net

Get your car looking

great this Summer

Before

After

Don Winslow’s

AUTO B O D Y

Celebrating 50 Years

MON-FRI 8-5 • SAT. 9-12

166 Holten Street • Danvers

(corner of Center & Collins)

978-762-6366 • 978-535-2474

www.DonWinslowAutoBody.com

We want to hear

from you!

Send us a letter at

editor@weeklynews.net.

Letters should be

no more than

300 words.


JUNE 16, 2022

O’SHEA

From page 1

The North Shore summer

public safety kids camps, formerly

known as the D.A.R.E.

program, are back after a

two-year hiatus due to the

COVID-19 pandemic.

The camps are free and

will be conducted by the Essex

County District Attorney's

office at the Higgins Middle

School in Peabody. Children

entering the fifth grade in the

fall are eligible.

There will be two sessions

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 781-593-7700 3

Former O’Shea Mansion

redevelopment well underway

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

The team renovating the former O’Shea Mansion. First row from left, Jake Connolly, Ed

Greeley, Javier Pimentel, Mark Anderson, second row from left Jared Ross, Michael Ross, Mark

Delloiacono, Bobby Braga, back row from left, Michael Hill, Robbie Scioli, Chris Delloiacono,

Julie Daigle, and Brian Moore.

Revolutionary War. The project

is six months ahead of schedule,

Greeley said, and will come in

under the $6 million budget he

first laid out.

While Greeley is the visionary

behind the overhaul of the

building, which the city seized

in 2015 after Gloucester-based

Empire Design & Development

bought the building with plans

to raze it and replace it with

apartments and shops, he gives

all the credit for the work being

done to revitalize the property

to his crew.

“These guys are bringing

this property back to historical

significance and prominence,”

he said during a Wednesday

afternoon tour of the construction

site. “These guys are taking

the vision I had in my head and

these guys are making it a reality.”

“Truthfully, I’m like an

over-glorified secretary,” Greeley

quipped.

The building was first constructed

in 1867, Greeley said,

but has roots going back at least

a century earlier, as 2 Washington

St. is the former home of

the Bell Inn & Tavern, where

a group of North Shore farmers

met about a week before

the battle of Concord and Lexington

in 1775. A tree planted

outside the property marks the

place where the farmers gathered,

Greeley said.

“It’s really the landmark that

makes the property special because

of its historical significance,”

he said. Bringing back

that historical significance is

one of Greeley’s primary goals

with the project. “There’s a significant

amount of pride in being

part of a project that brings

back about a historical property

to bring its relevance and its

prominence and we’re proud to

be a part of it.”

“It’s important to Peabody,

probably as important to the

city as any [building] based on

its historical challenges,” he

said.

Thus far, Greeley and his

team have already spent $1

million on restoration for the

project, restoring and repairing

numerous moldings, mantles,

walls, exterior siding, and

the buildings’ roof, which had

holes in it that allowed for rain

and snow to come in and filter

through the building. The

project is ahead of schedule, he

said, and should be completed

in a year.

“The trajectory we’re on,

we’re going to have a two year

project done in one and a half,”

Greeley said.

Mayor Ted Bettencourt

praised Greeley for creating a

“destination” for people from

across the region.

“This project surpasses even

our fondest wishes for what

would become of the beautiful

O’Shea Mansion,” he said.

“It will complement the many

other shops and restaurants in a

revitalized downtown Peabody

and will preserve the precious

Revolutionary history for which

the mansion is renowned.”

Public safety camps (former

D.A.R.E.) back this summer

from 8:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., the

first from July 25-29 and the

second on Aug. 1-5.

Police from the following

communities are expected to

participate: Lynnfield, Peabody,

Danvers, Beverly, Ipswich,

Lynn, Marblehead, Gloucester,

Salem, Saugus, and Swampscott.

Salem State University

police will also participate.

The program features workshops

on several topics including

gang resistance, the prevention

of violence, environmental

awareness and decision-making.

The program's focus is on

team building.

Greeley is confident that

rooms at the estate will fill up

quickly once it officially opens

its doors.

“[These] rooms will be some

of the nicest rooms in the North

Shore,” he said. “Anyone with

any knowledge of that comfort

is going to want to come back.

I’m not concerned with being

able to fill these rooms.”

All four floors of the mansion

will be revitalized by

Greeley and his team — with

the basement level serving as a

speakeasy with live music, the

first floor featuring indoor and

outdoor dining, and the second

and third floors containing four

rooms apiece — complete with

a bridal suite on the third floor.

Catering

available

SU•CHANG’S

Fine Chinese Cuisine

The carriage house at the back

of the property will contain

three luxury apartments.

The property will feature

modern touches — like the seethrough

walkway in the entry

— to complement the historic

features.

“The property has its own

personality, we’re not doing

away with its personality,”

Greeley said. “We’re staying

with a traditional restoration in

conjunction with modern improvements.

He described the envisioned

finished product as “a little bit

of modern meets a little bit of

historical.”

Greeley said the project

could not have gone ahead

without the help of Mayor Bettencourt

and the city council.

“If it weren’t for the mayor,

I doubt this structure would still

be here,” he said. “The mayor

and his city council went

through an awful lot to keep this

building intact. I’m fortunate to

be a part of that.”

Greeley looks forward to

welcoming in those who helped

keep the O’Shea mansion upright,

and push his proposal forward,

back to the property once

it’s finally opened.

“Our goal is to open those

doors and have everyone who

fought come in,” he said.

When he purchased 2 Washington

St. from the city, Greeley

also acquired 12 Washington St.

and 16 Washington St. Greeley

plans to tear down the former

St. Paul’s Episcopal Church at

12 Washington St., replacing it

with ample parking for staff and

guests of the bed-and-breakfast.

“We’re part of something

that’s larger than ourselves,” he

said.

Happy Father’s Day

Sunday, June 19

Remember to make your reservations!

Functions

From

2-200

373 Lowell St., Peabody • Tel. 531-3366 • Fax 531-3060

LUNCH M-F 11:30-3PM • Take Out Always Available Daily by Phone, Fax or our Website

SUN-THURS 11:30-10 PM • FRI-SAT 11:30-11PM

www.SuChangsPeabody.com

Looking for a house?

Check the real estate section!

Looking for past issues?

Find them on weeklynews.net


4

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 781-593-7700 JUNE 16, 2022

Police Log

PEABODY

WEEKLY NEWS

(USPS #66)

Telephone: 781-593-7700 • Fax: 781-581-3178

Mailing Address: 85 Exchange Street, Lynn, MA 01901

News and Advertising Offices: 85 Exchange Street, Lynn, MA 01901

Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday

www.weeklynews.net

Reporter: Anne Marie Tobin atobin@essexmediagroup.com

Sports Editor: Mike Alongi malongi@essexmediagroup.com

Advertising Reps: Ralph Mitchell rmitchell@essexmediagroup.com

Patricia Whalen pwhalen@essexmediagroup.com

Ernie Carpenter ecarpenter@essexmediagroup.com

Local Subscription Rate: $20 per year (52 issues) • Single Copy: $1.00

Deadlines: News: Monday, noon; Display Ads: Monday, noon;

Classified Ads: Monday, noon;

No cancellations accepted after deadline.

The Peabody Weekly News is published 52 times per year on Thursday by Essex

Media Group, Inc. No issue is printed during the week of Christmas. The Peabody

Weekly News is delivered via US Mail to homes in Peabody. It is also available

in several locations throughout Peabody. The Peabody Weekly News will not be

responsible for typographical or other errors in advertisements, but will reprint that

part of an advertisement in which a typographical error occurs if notified immediately.

Advertisers must notify the Peabody Weekly News of any errors in advertisements

on the FIRST day of insertion. The publisher reserves the right to reject,

omit or edit any copy offered for publication.

PEABODY WEEKL Y

N E WS

20

MAIL TO PEABODY WEEKLY NEWS, P.O. BOX 5, LYNN, MA 01903

CHECKS AND MONEY ORDERS ALSO ACCEPTED.

MAKE PAYABLE TO: ESSEX MEDIA GROUP, INC.

Monday, June 13

Animal control

A report of people at

Ledgewood Estates trapping

and getting rid of squirrels

Monday at 10:47 a.m. The caller

was directed to contact the environmental

police.

Complaints

A report of parties in the

parking lot at USA Speedy Auto,

108 Newbury St. Monday at

1:23 a.m.

A report of a downed wire at

54 Gardner Road Monday at

9:45 a.m. The fire department

cleared it.

Disturbances

A report of a female in distress

at 68 Pierpont St. and 92

Aborn St. Monday at 12:43 a.m.

The party was transported to

Salem Hospital.

Sunday, June 12

Arrests

Sergio Domingues Dasilva,

Jr., 23, of 17 Stevens St. Apt.

#3, was arrested and charged

Sunday at 9:52 p.m. with assault

and battery with a dangerous

weapon.

Jameson Cole Cardillo, 28,

of 3 Arlington Ave. Apt. #2, was

arrested and charged with operating

a motor vehicle with a

suspended license Sunday at

3:28 p.m.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a party going

through vehicles in the teachers

parking lot at Peabody Veterans

Memorial High School Sunday

at 11:48 a.m.

Complaints

A report of noise at the Kiley

Memorial School, 21 Johnson

St. Sunday at 3:55 a.m.

A report of a road rage incident

at Centennial Drive and

Route 128 North Sunday at 8:27

a.m. The parties had left the

area.

A report of a party passed

out in a gold sedan on Sprague

Street Sunday at 6:11 p.m.

Saturday, June 11

Accident

A report of a hit-and-run accident

at 112 Lowell St. Saturday

at 9:14 p.m.

Animal control

A report of a dog locked inside

a vehicle at J.C. Penney, 210J

Andover St. Saturday at 1:15

p.m.

A report of a dog left in a

vehicle at Trader Joe’s, 300

Andover St. Saturday at 3:21

p.m.

A report of a dog attack at 50

Warren St. Saturday at 6:19 p.m.

Arrest

Ashley M. Hood, 36, of 2

Wheeler St., Peabody was arrested

and charged Saturday at

12:57 p.m. with operating with

a suspended license, license not

in possession, another department

warrant and possession of

Class A, B and E drugs.

Complaints

A report of loud music at

Metro Bowl, 63 Foster St.

Saturday at 1:54 a.m.

A report of a suspicious

motor vehicle at 36 Franklin St.

Saturday at 12:15 p.m.

A report of a fight in progress

at Not Your Average Joe’s,

210N Andover St. The party had

a disagreement with a family

member. The parties were advised

to leave the area.

A report of loud music at 4

Davis Terrace Saturday at 8:42

p.m. The party agreed to turn

down the radio.

A report of loud music at 25

Proctor St. Saturday at 9:42

p.m. The parties agreed to turn

it down.

A report of loud music at 25

Proctor St. Saturday at 10:32

p.m. Police found the music was

off and the party was winding

down.

Larceny

A report of a break-in at the

Little League concession stand

at Macarthur Park, Macarthur

Circle Saturday at 10:49 p.m.

Officers checked the area of

the 7 Eleven on Lynn Street for

juveniles.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at North

Shore Burial Vault Co., 9 Sabino

Farm Road Saturday at 5:47 a.m.

Friday, June 10

Complaints

A report from a Higgins

Middle School teacher of a fight

at Emerson Park, Perkins Street

Friday at 2:44 p.m. The officer

on the scene stated there is a

parent yelling at a group of kids.

A report of a suspicious motor

vehicle with an engine running

at 2 Mason St. and 80 Foster St.

The vehicle was secured and the

keys were taken to the station

for safekeeping.

A report of a road rage incident

at 66 Tremont St. Friday at

4 p.m. The caller said another

operator accused her of cutting

him off and was punching

her vehicle. Officers could not

locate.

A report of a child hanging

out from a balcony at 21 Caler

St Apt. #210 Friday at 5:46 p.m.

Police found a broken screen

and a safety bar and advised the

child to not go near the window

and the resident to contact the

landlord.

A report of a violinist soliciting

money outside Trader Joe’s, 300

Andover St. Friday at 5:53 p.m.

The party was sent on his way.

Animal control

A report of dogs inside

a running motor vehicle at

Nordstrom, 210N Andover St.

Friday at 11:12 a.m. A citation

for leaving the vehicle running

and unattended will be issued to

the owner.

Larceny

A report of a wallet stolen

from a locker at Life Time

Fitness, 210L Andover St. Friday

at 8:43 p.m.

Summons

Matthew Burnett, 41, of 400

Jefferson Ave., Salem will be

summonsed for operating a

motor vehicle while under the influence

of drugs, possession of

a Class B drug and possession

of a Class C drug.


JUNE 16, 2022

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 781-593-7700 5

Religious News

Temple Tiferet Shalom

www.templetiferetshalom.org

489 Lowell St. Peabody.

Phone: 978-535-2100

Rabbi: David Kudan

Music Director: Bryna Toder

Tabasky

Friday night Shabbat services at

7:30 p.m. – held in person* and

via Streamspot

Saturday morning Service,

Snack, and Study at 9:30 a.m. –

in person*

*Check our website for upto-date

information regarding

COVID-19 policies.

Preschool, religious school,

adult education, social action

programs, life cycle events, and

holiday celebrations

We are a warm home for all who

wish to join our Jewish family!

Saint Adelaide and Saint Ann

are now a collaborative

One pastor: Rev. David C. Lewis

Saint Adelaide Parish

708 Lowell St.

Peabody, MA 01960

Masses: Vigil Mass 4 p.m. Saturday

8:30 & 10 a.m. Sunday - 12

p.m. Latin Mass.

10:00 Mass live streamed

www.saintadelaide.org

Saint Ann Parish

140 Lynn St.

Peabody, MA 01960

Vigil Mass on Saturday 4 p.m.

Sunday 9:30 a.m. and is live

streamed

www.catholic-church.org/~stann-peabody/public_html//

Temple Ner Tamid

Service Times:

Sunday to Thursday: 7 p.m.

Friday: 8 p.m.

Saturday: 9:30 a.m.

Holidays as published.

Join us online.

Services and all other programs

are being held virtually using

Zoom, Facebook and YouTube

Rabbi: Richard Perlman

Associate Rabbi: Bernie

Horowitz

Visit our website

www.templenertamid.org

Contact office:

978-532-1293

office@templenertamid.org

368 Lowell St. Peabody.

St. John Lutheran Church

Worship: 9:30 a.m., Sunday,

in-person and on Zoom

Bible Study: 11 a.m.

22 Ellsworth Road, Peabody

Website: https://stjohnpeabody.org

Church phone: 978-531-1731

Pastor: The Rev. Charles N.

Stevenson

Email: stjohnpastor@earthlink.

net

For the Zoom link, please email

the pastor.

St. Clare of Assisi

(non-Roman)

Our Parish family welcomes

everyone. We are not here to

condemn, criticize, or judge

you. Rather, we want to offer

our love, our support, and our

prayers for you. Your presence

is an important part of our

celebration of the Mass and

when you are not here, you are

missed!

The Rev. Fr. Mike

Otero-Otero, O.S.F.

978-804-2250

www.stclarepeabody.org

Holy Mass: Saturdays at 3 p.m.

St. Clare Mission (feeding the

hungry)

Saturdays at 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

Mission Outreach Services

(Homelessness Outreach)

Call Jill at 267-481-5725.

Al-Anon Meetings

Find us at:

https://alanonma.org/.

North Shore Baptist Church

706 Lowell St., W. Peabody

Sharing God’s Truth for Life’s

Transitions

Small Group Worship and Bible

Study (in-person) - 10:30

a.m. on Sundays. For information,

prayer or help, contact us

at 978-535-6186 or office@

northshorebaptistchurch.org.

Carmelite Chapel

Carmelite Chapel in the Northshore

Mall

Holy Mass:

Monday through Friday: Noon

and 3 p.m.

Saturday: Noon, 4 and 5:30 p.m.

Sunday: Noon

Confession:

Monday through Friday

11-11:45 a.m. and 2-2:45 p.m.

Saturday

11-11:45 a.m. and 2:45-3:45 p.m.

Gift Shop

Open Monday through

Saturday: 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

Phone: 978-531-8340

All Saints Episcopal Church

of the North Shore

Good morning and thank you!

All Saints Episcopal Church of

the North Shore in Danvers has

in-person worship, as well as

Zoom opportunities on Sunday

mornings and throughout the

week. Our webpage is https://

allsaintsepiscopalnorthshore.

org/, and we are also on Facebook,

Twitter and Instagram.

In-person Worship

Join us for our modified service

of the Holy Eucharist at

8:30 Sunday mornings, with

COVID-19 safety protocols in

place. Advanced registration is

required (call the church at 978-

774-1150).

Outreach

Join us on the third Sunday of

each month as we prepare 40-50

bagged lunches for the food insecure

in Peabody. Contact the

church office (978-774-1150) if

you would like to donate food

or help prepare the lunches.

We also have the following

Zoom services and fellowship

opportunities:

Worship on Sundays at 10 a.m.

https://zoom.us/j/134596872

Meeting ID: 134 596 872

Phone: 929-205-6099

Coffee hour on Tuesdays at 10

a.m.

https://zoom.us/j/201985541

Meeting ID: 201 985 541

Phone: + 1 929 205 6099

Frank Time Discussion on the

second Wednesdays of each

month at 5:15 pm

https://us02web.zoom.

us/j/85499949543

Meeting ID: 854 9994 9543

Phone: +1 929 205 6099

Morning Prayer on Fridays at

8:30 a.m.

https://zoom.us/j/96760775904

Meeting ID: 967 6077 5904

Phone: +1 929 205 6099 US

Perfect Paws Pet Ministry, the

third Sunday of each month at

5 p.m.

https://zoom.us/

j/990855545?pwd=YVN4bzFhOEpLZkY3Y1dxQkt2OTJMdz09

Meeting ID: 990 855 545

Password: Saintfranc

Parish office: Call 978-774-

1150 or email allstoffice@

gmail.com

Looking for past issues?

Find them on weeklynews.net


6

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 781-593-7700 JUNE 16, 2022

Seniors

All activities take place at the Torigian Senior Center at 75R Central St.

Savvy Senior: Adaptive Clothing

Takes the Stress Out of Dressing

DEAR SAVVY SENIOR:

What kinds of clothing options

are available to mobility challenged

seniors who have a difficult

time dressing?

LOOKING FOR MOM

Dear Looking,

The chore of dressing and undressing

in traditional clothing

can be difficult, time-consuming

and even painful for millions of

people with certain health and

mobility problems. Fortunately,

there’s a wide variety special

clothing, known as “adaptive

clothing,” that can help with

most dressing challenges. Here’s

what you should know.

What is Adaptive Clothing?

Adaptive clothing is specially

designed garments for people

with mobility issues, disabilities

and cognitive challenges who

have a difficult time getting

dressed. This type of clothing incorporates

discreet design features

to make dressing and undressing

easier, while still having

the outward appearance of typical

clothing.

Depending on your mom’s

needs, here are some of the many

different types of adaptive clothing

options that could help.

For self-dressing seniors who

suffer from Parkinson’s or other

disabilities that affect dexterity,

there are pants, shirts, dresses

and outerwear made with Velcro

or magnetic closures instead of

buttons and zippers, which are

much easier to fasten and unfasten.

But be aware that magnetic

closures are not suitable for those

who have pacemakers.

For those who are disabled or

who have limited range of motion

and need assistance dressing,

there are adaptive pants with

zippers or snaps on both sides of

the pants that are easier to pull

on. And a wide range of rear closure

shirts, tops and dresses with

Velcro or snap fasteners in the

back for those who can’t raise

their arms over their head.

For wheelchair users there are

higher back and elastic waistband

pants that don’t slip down,

as well as pants with fabric overlaps

at the seat to allow for easier

toileting access.

For people with tactile sensitivity,

there are garments you can

purchase that have soft and

stretchy fabrics without tags and

are sewn with flat seams to help

preventing chafing.

And for seniors with Alzheimer’s

disease there are one-piece

jumpsuits that have a back-zipper

access to prevent the wearer

from disrobing inappropriately.

Where to Shop?

Because each person’s dressing

needs and style is so specific,

finding appropriate adaptive

clothing can be difficult.

Recently, mainstream clothing

stores like JCPenney (jcpenney.

com), Target (target.com) and

Tommy Hilfiger (usa.tommy.

com) have started offering a line

of adaptive clothing for adults

that combines fashion and functionality,

but their instore options

are limited. To get a bigger

selection, visit the store’s website

and type in “adaptive clothing” in

their search engine.

You can also find a large selection

at online stores that specialize

in adaptive clothing like Buck

& Buck (buckandbuck.com) and

Silverts (silverts.com). Both of

these companies have been selling

adaptive clothing for decades

and offer a wide variety of garments

to accommodate almost

any need, condition or style, for

independent self-dressers and

for those who need help.

Some other adaptive clothing

sites you should visit include Joe

& Bella (joeandbella.com), Ovidis

(ovidis.com), and IZ Adaptive (izadaptive.com),

which sells clothing

primarily designed for wheelchair

users.

And, if your mom is in need of

adaptive footwear, Velcro fastening

shoes (instead of shoelaces)

SPONSORED BY

461 Boston Street, Unit B1 Topsfield

silverliningsolutions.com

have long been a popular option

and can be found in most local

shoe stores.

Some other new lines of adaptive

shoes that may interest her

include Kiziks (kizik.com) and

Zeba (zebashoes.com), which

make fashionable sneakers and

comfortable walking shoes that

just slip on, hands-free, along

with Billy Footwear (billyfootwear.com)

and Friendly Shoes

(friendlyshoes.com), which

makes uniquely designed zip-on

shoes.

Send your senior questions

to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box

5443, Norman, OK 73070, or

visit SavvySenior.org. Jim

Miller is a contributor to the

NBC Today show and author

of “The Savvy Senior” book.

Call Us Today

978-887-1100


JUNE 16, 2022

Fourth graders celebrated at

science fair award ceremony

By Emma FringuElli

Magic, drag bingo and mystery

on tap at the Black Box

By annE mariE ToBin

Peabody Municipal Light

Plant’s (PMLP) 36th annual

Science Fair Award Ceremony

last week celebrated excellence

in science and education.

Held at Peabody Veterans

Memorial High School on June

9, the ceremony recognized 109

fourth grade students for their

achievements in the month-long

contest.

The first place winners were:

Lucas Mattuchio, Nina Silva,

Lexie Brennan, Alvin Duran,

Alex Linton, Chase Cabral,

Morgan Gallagher, Jacob Secatore,

Lucas Comeau, Kinsley

Guimaraes, Benjamin Mallett,

Nathan Titus, Louis Chipman,

Raffaele LoPriore, Lucas

Booth, Thomas K. Pereira, Gustavo

Emerick Santos, Marcos

Delacruz, Joni Maksutaj, Jeffrey

Davidson, Zion Francois,

Riley Gravelese, Lia Gaudet,

Grace Kent, Gianna Lawrence,

Keely Palmer, Hunter Lebrun,

Guilherme Rocha, Christian

Rodas Solares, Joseph Santana,

Ryan Champigny, Madyson

Fisher, and Cesia Juarez.

The second place winners

were: Eddison Bun, Theodore

Ferrante IV, Jonathan Santiago,

Violet Trombley, Saliah Pacheco,

Angeline Qirjazi, Sirena

Doran, Abby Papajani, Anya

Wall, Max Adams, Isadora De

Oliveira, Hope Gichuki, Olivia

Palmieri, Giulia Barbosa, Sophia

Cesar, Layla Devoe, Nadia

Mitchell, Mackayla Buckley,

Adam Coimbra, and Cole Mattera.

The third place winners

were: John Carbone, Caiden

Charles, Anthony Jacobsen,

Morgan Elizabeth White, Sienna

Crosby, Sabrina Moore,

Lindsay Patch, Isabelly Cardoso,

Franyeni Gomez Luzon,

Rylie Saulnier, John William

Tyack, Isabella Gosselin, Raegan

Perreault, Addison Sousa,

Maya Shahin, Rafhael Barbosa,

Jack Crombie, Jackson Le,

Miguel Maneta-Faconi, Joshua

Almeida, Olivia Broderick,

Kelsey Pickett, Emily Sanon,

Brendan Bartone, Brooklyn

Costantino, and Luke Langone.

Honorable mentions include:

Julie Cutter, Joseph

Deleary, Camilla Lima, Tessa

O’Brien, Murilo Dos Santos

Souza, Landyn Mason, Nathan

Mbanga, Joseph Billingsley,

Ioanna Kalaitzidis, Nathan

Mover, Charleigh Nugent, Ulysses

Grullon, Jed Sencabaugh,

"CJ" Christopher Colagiovanni,

Ricardo Gonzalez, Brooklyn

Ramirez, Meghan Foley, Gemma

Krinsky, Kauan Patricio,

Mason Barros, Vincent Doucette,

Abby Lanphear, Grace

Swindell, Yuri Aredes, Farrah

Dupuis, Precious Omokoya,

Elvin Polanco, Sofia Agnello,

Paul Capurso, and Leland Dermody.

After the contest began in

May, student projects were presented

to parents and classmates

and judged by PMLP employees.

First, second, and thirdplace

ribbons, as well as honorable

mentions were awarded to

student teams.

"Drag Queen Bingo" with

Miss Michael and Miz Diamond

WigFall will be held on Friday,

June 17 from 8:30-10 p.m. Tickets

for the show, which is a 21+

event, must be purchased in advance.

Tickets are $30 each and

include cash bar, ice-cream bar,

and light snacks. There will be

a 50-50 raffle. Event proceeds

benefit NAGLY (North Shore

Alliance of GLBTQ Youth).

Award-winning magician

Matt Roberts is bringing his

New York hit “42nd Street Comedy

Magic Show" back to the

Black Box on Saturday, July 9.

The 80-minute show, which

is suitable for all age groups,

starts at 7 p.m.

Roberts will have you alternating

between laughter and

awe as he presents his one-man

brand of sleight of hand, levitation,

"mind reading," and even

a jaw-dropping twist on one of

Houdini's famous feats, all in a

setting perfectly designed for intimate

magic.

Reconnect with the feeling

of real surprise during a performance

the whole family will be

talking about long after the astonishing

finale.

Due to COVID, performances

will be capped at a maximum

of 50 people seated socially-distanced

by party. Seating is at tables.

Masks are required while

on premises.

Tickets range from $17.50 to

$40 per person.

The VIP premier of the documentary

"The Catalyst," will

be held on Friday, Aug. 19 from

8-9:30 p.m.

The Catalyst is the first film

in the Haunted Peabody Documentary

Series, a series highlighting

unexplained encounters

and paranormal activity inside

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 781-593-7700 7

“Our fourth graders here today

represent some incredible

work that's taking place at our

[schools] and I'm very proud

of the hard work that went

into this,” said Mayor Edward

A. Bettencourt, Jr. before the

awards were handed out.

Students from the winning

teams from all eight elementary

schools received plaques and

citations from Mayor Bettencourt,

state Sen. Joan B. Lovely,

and state Reps. Thomas P.

Walsh and Sally P. Kerans. Students

also received a congratulatory

letter from U.S. Rep.

Seth Moulton. The winners received

a Barnes & Noble gift

card courtesy of PMLP.

“You could see their enthusiasm

exude from them,” said

John Maihos, PMLP human

resources and community relations

director. “If we can encourage

a student to think about

science — that’s a plus.”

Maihos said the science fair,

supported by PMLP, would not

have been possible without the

help of the Peabody elementary

school teachers and administrators,

who were also praised at

the ceremony.

After the awards, pastries

made by the high school culinary

department were available

for those in attendance.

PMLP serves residents of

Peabody and South Lynnfield

as a community-owned, notfor-profit

utility company. The

PMLP Science Fair is one of

many youth community programs

in which PMLP participates.

the building now known as the

"old" Peabody Post Office.

Enjoy a cocktail and hors

d'oeuvres hour, meet-and-greet

with the producers, be one of the

first to see the initial version of

the film, and have the opportunity

for an intimate question and

answer session with the staff and

investigators following the film.

Silent auction items will include

the opportunity to spend

some time in the infamously

haunted basement of the building

via private tour.

Tickets are $40 each. All proceeds

go to finish the film in its

full version and to continue discovery

and investigation of other

haunted sites in Peabody.

Guests must be 18 and over,

due to both frightful and mature

content.

For tickets to all Black Box

events, go to https://ne-arc.org/

black-box-events/.

Our Ask the Expert question

of the day is answered by

Why should you

have a primary

care physician?

Answered by Dr. Bernard Bettencourt

The right doctor can have a positive impact on

your health and well-being. Choosing one in your

health plan can save you money as well.

What is a primary care physician?

A primary care physician (PCP) serves as your

main doctor and is your first stop when you need

care. When you see the same doctor over time,

they can:

• See the full picture of your health. They know your health

history and can connect the dots quickly if you have a health

issue.

• Save you time and money. A PCP helps you stay healthy with

preventative care and can help manage chronic conditions and

medications.

• Coordinate your care and treatments. PCPs help ensure tests

aren’t needlessly repeated, your medicines work well together,

and your other doctors agree on your health needs.

• Help you avoid costly ER visits. Call your PCP first when you

have an illness, minor injury, or flare-up of a chronic condition.

They can advise you where to go for care. However, if you

believe you are having a life-threatening emergency, or your

health is in serious jeopardy, call 911 immediately.

• Assist you after hours. Many PCPs now have evening and

weekend hours. Some may also offer telehealth virtual visits.

What are the different types of primary care

physicians?

There are three types of primary care physicians.

Family practitioners and general practice doctors

treat people of all ages. This type of doctor might

be a good choice if you want to keep your family’s

care “under one roof.” Internal medicine doctors,

also called internists, treat adults and may have

special knowledge about certain health problems.

If you have a long-term health condition, an

internist who specializes in your issue may be a

good fit. Finally, pediatricians specialize in caring

for children, from birth to early adulthood.

What should I consider when choosing a primary

care physician?

Every doctor is different. Take time to find a doctor

who makes you feel comfortable, listens to your

needs, and explains things clearly. It’s also

important to find out if the doctor:

• Is part of your health plan’s network. You’ll pay less out of

pocket for your visits, preventative care screenings, vaccinations,

and annual physicals. If your doctor is not in your plan’s

network, you may not be covered at all.

• Has the training and background to treat your health

problems.

• Has an office in a convenient location, close to your home or

work.

• Holds office hours that work with your schedule.

• Offers telehealth options, such as text, email, phone, or video

visits.

You can visit different doctors in your plan’s

network to find the one who is right for you. If

you’re not happy with your first choice, it’s okay.

You may be able to change your primary care

doctor depending on your plan.

Having a primary care physician as part of you

and your family’s healthcare team is important to

coordinating your care and keeping your healthcare

costs affordable.

Bernard Bettencourt, DO, MPH, is the medical

director for UniCare. He is a board-certified

specialist in emergency and occupational and

environmental medicine. Learn more about

UniCare at www.unicaremass.com.

Learn more at unicaremass.com


8

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 781-593-7700 JUNE 16, 2022

Culture Club unveils racial justice mural

By AnThony CAMMAlleri

Cherry Blossoms paved the

stairs leading up to Peabody Veterans

Memorial High School’s

upper lobby last Wednesday night

when their culture club unveiled

its new mural for racial justice,

“Hope Springs from Groundbreaking

Roots.”

Mayor Edward A. Bettencourt,

Jr. and School Committee Member

Beverley Ann Griffin Dunne

were among those seated in the

approximately 18-person crowd

as club Co-Presidents Jada Martinez

and Carissa Furtado pulled

back the decorative sheet obscuring

the mural.

The mural, which students

spent more than two years painting,

depicts a cherry tree with

paper flower blossoms attached

to the branches and paper butterflies

taped around the trunk. The

tree’s roots, meant to symbolize

the roots of the fight for racial justice,

are marked by the names of

Emmett Till, Rosa Parks, Malcom

X, and others.

Among the butterflies are the

names of those who lost their lives

due to injustice, and on the flowers

are the names of those who inspire

hope for future equality.

Following the unveiling, the

culture club surprised Martinez

with her own cherry blossom

flower to tape to the mural.

“Personally, I feel like the biggest

accomplishment for me was

receiving my flower, but also,

people’s reactions,” Martinez said.

“Having such a supportive community

of people who are learning

and trying to understand what it’s

like being a part of a community.

Especially with Black Lives, and

what our culture and community

PHOTO | JAKOB MENENDEZ

From left, Co-Presidents of the PVMHS Culture Club, Carissa

Furtado and Jada Martinez, Treasurer Aisha Nalugo, and

Secretary Tolulope Adeniyi stand next to the newly unveiled

mural that was painted by the club after months of remote

planning.

means to us, I think the reaction

that we got here today was so

heartwarming and fulfilling.”

Furtado said that she was

stressed with the idea of finishing

the mural, and excited to see

the two year project successfully

completed.

“Making the mural, I was like

‘oh my God, we’re never going

to finish it,’ because it was such a

daunting task, but having finished

it, and being here, makes me really

happy and really excited for students

to see it,” Furtado said.

Club Co-Advisor Mary Henry

said that she was proud of the students,

and that their passion for racial

equality sends a strong, hopeful

message to the community.

“I feel like it couldn’t have

gone better if we tried. I think that

the community sees what these

kids stand for and it’s powerful,

and it’s beautiful, and it’s hopeful,

and it’s strong,” Henry said.

“The fact that they were able to

come up with this concept out of

nothing, and it was student-driven,

it’s just incredible and it’s

something we’ll remember for

the rest of our lives.”

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Chris Vasquez, general manager at La Siesta Restaurante in Peabody discusses ways to utilize

students from the culinary programs at Peabody Veterans Memorial High School and Essex

North Shore Agricultural & Technical School at his restaurant on Tuesday.

City dishes out help to local

restaurants, culinary students

By Anne MArie ToBin

The city, in partnership with

the Peabody Area Chamber of

Commerce (PACC) is stepping

up its efforts to help restaurants

that continue to struggle in the

face of a stubborn pandemic and

tight labor market.

The partnership's mission

is to connect local restaurant

owners with the culinary program

directors from Peabody

Veterans Memorial High School

(PVMHS) and the Essex North

Shore Agricultural & Technical

School.

A kick-off networking event

took place Tuesday in Wiggin

Auditorium at Peabody City

Hall. PACC Executive Director

Beth Amico said the program is

expected to provide mutual benefits

to all participants.

“This initial forum is designed

simply to establish relationships

between our member

businesses and culinary staff at

Peabody High and Essex Tech,”

said Amico. “Ultimately, we

hope to create an employment

pipeline between the schools and

the restaurants which will benefit

students and business owners

alike.”

Mayor Edward A. Bettencourt,

Jr. said that when Amico

reached out to his office, he

enthusiastically embraced the

concept. He not only invited

the high school's culinary staff

members to attend the forum,

but also offered to host the event

at City Hall.

“Many of our restaurants in

Peabody are small, family-run

businesses which have really

struggled in recent years,” Bettencourt

said. “Now they face

staffing challenges heading into

the summer. I think it’s important

that we continue to support

them during these difficult times

while also helping to provide our

students with real-world industry

experience.”

Champions Pub owner Phil

Mitchell said he is a huge fan of

the program. He said he has used

culinary students from North

Shore Community College in the

past, but all of them were unsuccessful

due to space constraints

of the Champions kitchen and its

high-pressure environment.

"This is a great program,

a tremendous opportunity for

many restaurants that typically

have larger kitchens and line

cooking, but we simply don't

have the space," he said.

"We have one guy manning

all stations, and really no place

for anyone else, so for us, we are

just not a good match. Having

said that, I am certain there are

many places who will be great

matches for these students. For

them, it's a win-win for everyone

and while it doesn't work for

us, I encourage other restaurants

to get involved as it can have

huge benefits and it's a chance

to support your fellow business

owners and give kids jobs at the

same time."

Peabody Children’s

Museum has a new

executive director

By Anne MArie ToBin

Ali Haydock has been named

executive director of the new Peabody

Curious City Children's Museum.

"I am thrilled by the opportunity

to lead the Children's Museum

during this exciting time of formation

and growth,” said Haydock,

the current director of development

at Citizens Inn. "I love serving the

Peabody community and look forward

to working collaboratively

to create something wonderful for

local families and children."

The Children's Museum has

been in the works for nearly eight

years. The museum took a major

step forward in February when

the Finance Committee approved

Mayor Edward A. Bettencourt,

Jr.'s proposal for financing for the

museum, which is to be located at

the former TD Bank building at 10

Main St. The committee approved

the creation of two full-time positions,

including executive director,

and also authorized the city to

enter into a five-year lease of the

property. Bettencourt has estimated

the museum will have a budget

of approximately $550,000 per

year.

Bettencourt said the museum

has been a priority for him since

2014. He feels that Haydock's diverse

background makes her the

perfect candidate to launch the

new initiative.

"We interviewed a number of

very well-qualified applicants for

executive director, and we feel that

Ali will really thrive in the role,"

said Bettencourt. "In addition to

her extensive fundraising background,

Ali excels at volunteer and

event management, marketing,

and grant writing. She has a proven

track record which is ideally

suited to launch and lead this exciting

new venture."

During her tenure at Citizens,

Ali led a development team

which more than doubled the

organization's fundraising totals

in less than five years. She also

managed a grant program which

secured $475,000 from the Commonwealth

of Massachusetts and

$100,000 from the Cummings

Foundation.

Working with the state departments

of Public Health and

Housing and Community Development,

Haydock helped to secure

an additional $200,000 per year for

Citizens' shelter programs.

Haydock received her undergraduate

degree from the College

of the Holy Cross in Worcester

and an MBA in non-profit management

from Boston University's

Questrom School of Business. She

began her career teaching children

with autism at the New England

Center for Children in Southborough.

In that role, she served as

a liaison for parents and as case

manager for students in the residential

program.

In 2012, Haydock embarked

on a career in fundraising as a

development assistant at Harvard

University. She was subsequently

named associate director of

development at Massachusetts

General Hospital where she coordinated

the annual MGH Golf

Classic and helped raise $300,000

from over 30 event sponsors.

While at Mass General, Haydock

implemented a volunteer

management process to manage

two high level volunteer councils,

the President's Council and the

MGH Fund Leadership Council.


JUNE 16, 2022

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 781-593-7700 9

Tanners slug into state semifinals

GIRLS SOFTBALL

By Mike Alongi

The Peabody softball team

may have taken a little longer

than usual to get the bats going,

but in the end the No. 9 Tanners

started clicking and ran away

with an 11-1 win over No. 16

Newton North in a Division

1 tournament Round of 8

game Friday evening at Kiley

Brothers Field.

Avery Grieco led the offensive

attack for the Tanners,

going 2-for-3 with a home run

and three RBI. Kiley Doolin

went 1-for-2 with two RBI,

while Logan Lomasney (2-

for-4), Emma Bloom (2-for-

4), Abby Bettencourt (1-for-4)

and Gina Terrazzano (1-for-3,

double) each notched one RBI.

Jess Steed (2-for-3, triple) and

Isabel Bettencourt (1-for-4)

also added hits in the win for

Peabody. The only player in

the lineup who didn’t notch

a hit — Penny Spack — still

reached base three times and

scored a run.

“The way we hit towards the

end of the game is how I know

we can hit, so I’m glad we finally

were able to get the bats

going as the game went on,”

said Peabody coach Tawny

Palmieri. “Every girl in the

lineup contributed to the win

(Friday), and that’s a huge confidence

booster for us.”

Abby Bettencourt also

picked the win in the circle for

Peabody, tossing a complete

game and allowing one run on

just two hits with three walks

and four strikeouts. She took a

no-hitter into the sixth inning.

“She’s just so steady for

us out there, we always have

confidence in her when she’s

pitching,” Palmieri said of

Abby Bettencourt. “She was

mixing up her pitches and really

keeping them off balance.”

After Abby Bettencourt

worked through a 1-2-3 top

of the first inning, the Tanners

came out in the bottom of the

first and got right to work.

It all started with Bloom’s

one-out single, then Spack

drew a walk and Grieco was hit

by a pitch to load up the bases.

That opened up the door for

Doolin, who hit a hard ground

ball to shortstop. The Newton

North defender attempted to

make the play at third base,

but the throw got away and allowed

two Tanners runners to

come home and make it a 2-0

game.

Newton North put together

a threat of its own in the top

of the second, putting two

runners on with one out. But

Abby Bettencourt worked her

way out of the jam, forcing two

straight groundouts to get out

of the inning unscathed.

Peabody’s Isabel Bettencourt makes contact with the ball.

The score remained there

until the bottom of the fourth,

when Peabody was able to

push two more runs across.

Doolin drew a walk to open up

the inning, and after a ground

out from Logan Lomasney

moved her over the second,

Terrazzano stepped into the

box and ripped an RBI double

off the right center field wall

to make it 3-0. Steed followed

that with a single that nearly

drove in another run, but

Terrazzano got caught in a rundown

between third and home.

But it didn’t end up mattering

too much, as Abby Bettencourt

stepped into the box next and

knocked Steed home with an

RBI single.

From there the Tanners

turned on the faucet.

Grieco smashed a two-run

homer in the bottom of the fifth

to push the lead to six nothing,

and after Newton North finally

pushed across a run in the top

of the sixth, the Tanners exploded

for five runs in the

bottom of the inning.

A two-run single from

Doolin and RBI knocks from

Bloom, Grieco and Lomasney

rounded out the scoring

for Peabody before Abby

Bettencourt moved 1-2-3

through the Tigers order in the

top of the seventh to seal the

victory.

Following the win Palmieri

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

gave the team a day off, before

returning to the field to

prepare for its semifinal game

against No. 4 Wachusett Reg.

regional on Tuesday.

“We’re (going to be) ready

for the challenge,” said

Palmieri. “The biggest thing

for us is to not take anyone

lightly, and we’re going to

approach this game the same

way we’ve approached every

game this season.”


10

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 781-593-7700 JUNE 16, 2022

By Steve Krause

Moynihan Lumber marks 30 years

of celebrating student achievement

Moynihan Lumber observed

its 30th year of honoring its

North Shore Student Athletes

of the Year program by

bringing back one of the first

winners of the scholarship.

Peabody Mayor Ted

Bettencourt was given the Post-

Graduate Award and served as

the featured speaker at the luncheon

at Salem Country Club

Tuesday.

Arianna Bezanson of

Danvers High and Tyler Knox

of St. John’s Prep were the

two winners of this year’s

scholarships.

Bettencourt, from Peabody

High, was the 1991-1992

winner along with Lauren

Maney of Lynnfield High. Both

ended up going to Holy Cross,

and they remain good friends,

Bettencourt said. The girls’

winner that year was Lauren

Maney of Lynnfield, who was

unable to attend the luncheon.

“I remember the pride

I felt winning the award,”

Bettencourt said. “I also remembered

my parents, sisters

and brothers. It’s a family

thing. The love and support

from my family matters.

“This award meant a tremendous

amount to my mother,”

he said, “that it was for student

achievement too.”

Bettencourt congratulated

Moynihan Lumber for

“keeping a 30-year tradition

alive. There is something special

about this award.

“I have always been a lover

of local sports,” he said. “I

keep track of all the scores, and

get to as many games as I can.”

“This award means something,”

Bettencourt said.

“It means something to me,

my family, and to the North

Shore.”

Moynihan also presented

Bob DeFelice with a lifetime

achievement award. DeFelice,

of Winthrop, retired after a

54-year career as a coach,

including 30 as the baseball

coach/athletic director at

Bentley University. He is in

nine halls of fame.

“This has been a great life

for me, being involved in

athletics,” DeFelice said. He

joked that he was sitting at a

table of Marblehead people

“who didn’t enjoy their lunch

very much,” and also said he

had to sit next to his big brother

Frank, another coaching legend

on the North Shore.

Others honored included basketball

referee June Murphy and

Independent Newspaper Group

reporter/editor Cary Shuman,

both receiving the Lifetime

Commitment/Community

Award; Marblehead assistant

athletic director Mark Tarmey

and Manchester-Essex coach

Margaret “Muffin” Driscoll,

Lifetime Commitment/Schools

Award; and Lynn Cable TV

broadcaster John Hoffman, Fan

Award.

A special presentation was

given posthumously to longtime

Peabody High athletic

secretary Kathy Strange,

who died last winter. Strange

was also given the Lifetime

Commitment/Schools Award.

Former AD Phil Sheridan

accepted the award in her

memory.

Bezanson, a girls soccer

player, won the first of the

monthly awards of the school

year, last September. Coach

Jim Hinchion, who introduced

her, said he has known

her since she was six years old

and could tell that she was a

good athlete, and that she was

extremely competitive -- two

traits that only grew as she got

older.

The Falcons won the

Northeastern Conference all

four years she played for them.

But beyond accolades, what

impressed Hinchion was her

leadership abilities.

“She is a leader in every

sense of the word,” he said.

During her senior year,

Bezanson scored 22 goals and

finished with 34 points.

“She carried us on her back

to the state quarterfinal,” he

said.

Among her highlights this

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Arianna Bezanson of Danvers and Tyler Knox of St. John’s Prep were honored by Jack Moynihan

of Moynihan Lumber at the North Shore Student-Athletes of the Year at Salem Country Club

on Tuesday.

year, she was the team MVP, an

all-star in the NEC and Eastern

Mass, was on the All-American

Team, and is the Gatorade

Player of the Year nominee

from Massachusetts. She will

be attending Colgate in the fall

and majoring in biology. She

hopes to become a surgeon.

Knox, or “Knoxie,” as coach

Manny Costa called him, was a

special wrestler. He’s the third

St. John’s wrestler to win the

yearly Moynihan award — the

other two being Ryan Malo and

Costa’s own son, Hunter.

This year, en route to a perfect

season that took him to the

national championship, Knox

— a junior who has already

committed to Stanford —

didn’t even allow a point until

the New England quarterfinals.

He is currently ranked seventh

in the nation in his 120-pound

weight category.

Equally impressive, said

Costa, was Knox’s 4.39 GPA.

“Already, he’s had three Ivy

League schools looking at him,

but he got a call from Stanford

and went out there,” said Costa.

“And he called me and said the

place seemed right for him. So,

after he’s done here, he’ll be

going out to Stanford.”

Knox, Costa said, “respects

the sport of wrestling as much

as possible. The objective in

wrestling is to pin your opponent.

I’ve seen him begin

matches with a handshake, pin

his opponent, and then get up

and shake his hand again.”

The awards ceremony has

been held every year since

1992 except for 2020, when

it was canceled due to the

COVID-19 pandemic.

Looking for past issues?

Find them on weeklynews.net

PHOTO| SPENSER HASAK

Moynihan Lumber hosts the 30th annual North Shore Student-Athlete Award Program at Salem

Country Club on Tuesday.


JUNE 16, 2022

OPEN

FATHERS DAY

9-3pm

FREE

DELIVERY

SAMEDAY DELIVERY

$9.99

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 781-593-7700 11

Happy Father’s Day

Father’s day is Sunday, June 19th!

ORDER TODAY

Peabody, MA. 637 Lowell St. (Big Y Plaza) 978-536-7010

Beverly, MA. 45 Enon St. 978-927-3120

*Cannot be combined with any other offer.

Restrictions may apply. See store for

details. Edible ® , Edible Arrangements ® ,

and the Fruit Basket Logo are registered

Trademarks of Edible IP, LLC. © 2021

Edible IP, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Birdies, bogies, and homeruns

Abby Bettencourt pitches for Peabody against Newton-North on Friday.

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

PHOTO | JAKOB MENENDEZ

Steve Lomasney of the MGR Construction Management Inc.

team tees off from hole 1 at The Meadow Peabody Golf Course

during the Peabody Chamber of Commerce annnual golf fundraiser.on

Friday.

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Peabody’s Logan Lomasney gets in front of a ground ball.

Looking for past issues?

Find them on weeklynews.net

Fans cheer after Peabody’s Avery Grieco hit a homerun into the stands.

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK


12

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 781-593-7700 JUNE 16, 2022

This week in sports

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Peabody’s Emma Bloom fires the ball to first after making the tag on second.

Peabody’s Avery Grieco makes contact with the ball.

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

PHOTO | JAKOB MENENDEZ

Jason Vitale of the MGR Construction Management Inc. team tees off from

hole 1 at The Meadow Peabody Golf Course during the Peabody Chamber of

Commerce annnual golf fundraiser.

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Peabody’s Jess Steed claps and cheers back at her team after hitting a triple.

Peabody’s Gina Terrazzano slides safely into second.

PHOTO | JAKOB MENENDEZ


JUNE 16, 2022

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 781-593-7700 13

Rebuilding O’Shea one board at a time

Photos | Spenser Hasak

Michael Hill of Beverly places ceiling molding in the future dining room of the renovated O’Shea Mansion.

Renovations of the former O’Shea Mansion are ahead of schedule.

The framing of a room in the bed-and-breakfast being built in

the former O’Shea Mansion.

Mills’ 58 team members, from left, Michael Ross, Javier Pimentel, and Robbie Scioli prepare to move

a built-in shelf section to be cleaned and repurposed in the speakeasy of the former O’Shea Mansion.

The balcony of the former O’Shea Mansion is in the process of

being renovated.


14

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 781-593-7700 JUNE 16, 2022

Classified

• Residential

• Commerical

• Industrial

ALL PAVING INSTALLED BY

ROAD PAVING MACHINES TO

INSURE UNIFORM SURFACES

=FULLY INSURED=

KUESTENMACHER SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS

Scholarship awards were recently granted under the Walter and Elizabeth

Kuestenmacher Scholarship Fund.

The fund provides for two annual scholarships to be awarded to worthy graduates

of Lynnfield High School who manifest a serious and sincere desire to embrace a

career in one of the health professions. Past as well as present graduates are

eligible.

This year's award winners are:

Gianna Fuccillo, LHS Class of 2022 and Brooke Hubacz, LHS Class of 2022

WEEKLY NEWS: June 16, 2022

• CARPENTRY • TILE

• PAINTING

978-314-4191

LICENSED & INSURED

amoutsoulashomeimprovementservices.com

Follow us

on Facebook

CUSTOM PAVING

3rd Generation Paving Contractor

Serving the North Shore since 1981

Looking for past issues?

Find them on weeklynews.net

HOME AND BUSINESS SERVICES

• Emergency Winter Maintenance

• Parking Lots • Patchwork

• Private Roads • Sealcoating

RELOCATING?

WEST

PEABODY

(978) 535-8980

(800) 227-1652

www.CustomAsphaltPaving.com

Have something to sell?

We can help!

“Helpful tips” for a S-M-O-O-T-H trouble-free move!

Designate a drawer for essentials such as

sheets and towels for quick access the

first night you move into your new home.

Plan a garage/yard sale before you move.

Fresh coffee, baking soda, or charcoal in a

sock, placed inside your refrigerator will

keep the inside smelling fresh and clean.

Selling a house? Buying a house?

Find out what properties recently sold in your area.

Check out the Real Estate page in Saturday’s paper.

Does your company need employees?

Placing a help wanted ad is

great for finding the skilled

workers you need.

(SEAL)

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS

LAND COURT

DEPARTMENT OF THE TRIAL COURT

Docket 22 SM 001501

ORDER OF NOTICE

To:

Michael J. Thibault ; Elizabeth Thibault

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts

City of Peabody

The owner or occupants of the following described parcels of land situated in the

City of Peabody, in the County of Essex and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts,

and the public, are hereby notified that the taxes, thereon, severally assessed for

the years(s) hereinafter specified, according to the list committed to me as the

Collector of Taxes for the City of Peabody by the Board of Assessors of said city,

remain unpaid, and that said parcels of land will be taken for the City of Peabody

on July 01, 2022, at 10 a.m. for the principal and interest, if any, with all legal

costs and charges thereon unless the same shall be previously

discharged, all plans referred to are on file in the Assessor's Office.

Christopher Morfis, City Collector

Fiscal 2021

RIVITZ HELEN M LIFE ESTATE

MCNEALY JOHN & ELIZABETH A

15,002 Sq.Ft. of land with improvements situated

at 13 HERRICK RD Parcel 032-016

Registry of Deeds Deed Book-21067 Page-144 2021 003313-00

Tax assessed $4,560.15, Balance due $521.79

COBURN KENNETH & ANITA J IRREVOCABLE TRUST

Subsequent Owner COBURN KENNETH & ANITA J COBURN

23,339 Sq.Ft. of land with improvements situated

at 2 PRINCETON ST Parcel 049-036

Registry of Deeds Deed Book- Page- 2021 004929-00

Land Court Cert#-C82017

Land Court Cert#-D485230

Tax assessed $5,011.49, Balance due $3,241.62

PINTO FABIO & BERTA TRS

PINTO-BOWDITCH REALTY TRUST

Subsequent Owner PINTO MARIA TRUSTEE

4,979 Sq.Ft. of land with improvements situated

at 18 BOWDITCH ST Parcel 064-224

Registry of Deeds Deed Book-39126 Page-563 2021 007141-00

Tax assessed $11,709.21, Balance due $6,985.37

CUTTER JASON & TERRY SARAH

5,001 Sq.Ft. of land with improvements situated

at 5 JAMES ST Parcel 084-066

Registry of Deeds Deed Book-36967 Page-310 2021 010166-00

Tax assessed $3,888.12, Balance due $634.97

SOUSA MARIA L FAMILY IRREVOCABLE TRUST

Subsequent Owner SOUSA MARIA L

5,519 Sq.Ft. of land with improvements situated

at 36 SUTTON ST Parcel 104-092

Registry of Deeds Deed Book-32274 Page-425 2021 013757-00

Tax assessed $3,859.83, Balance due $4,397.21

WEEKLY NEWS: June 16, 2022

LEGALS

and to all persons entitled to the benefit of the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act, 50

U.S.C. c. 50 §3901 (et seq):

U.S. Bank National Association, not in its individual capacity but solely as trustee

for the RMAC Trust, Series 2018 G-CTT,

claiming to have an interest in a Mortgage covering real property in Peabody,

numbered 11 Columbia Boulevard, given by Michael J. Thibault and Elizabeth

Thibault to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for NE

Moves Mortgage, LLC, a Limited Liability Company, its successors and assigns,

dated July 12, 2012, and recorded in Essex County (Southern District) Registry of

Deeds in Book 31516, Page 112, as affected by a Loan Modification dated

November 2, 2015, and recorded in Said Registry of Deeds in Book 34608, Page

597, as affected by a Loan Modification dated January 16, 2019, and recorded in

Said Registry of Deeds in Book 37329, Page 570, and now held by plaintiff by

assignment, has/have filed with this court a complaint for determination of

Defendant's/Defendants' Servicemembers status.

If you now are, or recently have been, in the active military service of the United

States of America, then you may be entitled to the benefits of the Servicemembers

Civil Relief Act. If you object to a foreclosure of the above-mentioned property on

that basis, then you or your attorney must file a written appearance and answer in

this court at Three Pemberton Square, Boston, MA 02108 on or before July 18,

2022, or you may lose the opportunity to challenge the foreclosure on the ground

of noncompliance with the Act.

Witness, GORDON H. PIPER, Chief Justice of this Court on June 2, 2022.

Attest:

Deborah J. Patterson

Recorder

22-003236

781-593-7700, ext.2


JUNE 16, 2022

LYNNFIELD

7 BRYANT ST

$1,575,000

B: George A Scangas & Michelle M

Scangas

S: Robert M Barrientos Jr & Bianca L

Boghosian

18 PERRY AVE

$975,000

B: Adam Arsenault & Keri Barrett

S: Kristina L Burkardt & Sean T Burkardt

527 SALEM ST U:31

$1,290,000

B: Ellie H Min

S: James W Flint Tr, Tr for J W&C M Flint

LT

PEABODY

9 ALLEN RD

$8,360,000

B: Kristina Beck

S: Antonio Abras & Marlene F Bretas-

Abras

13 ANTONIO DR

$975,000

B: Zoe Haskell & Kenneth M Haskell

S: Roger J Kiricoples & Laurie A

Kiricoples

4 ASPEN LN U:4

$552,000

B: Bianca B Barrientos

S: Judith A Anderson & Robert W

Anderson

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 781-593-7700 15

Real Estate Transfers

10 BECKETT ST

$175,000

B: Lucy Wiggin

S: Jose I Silveira & Maria F Silveira

24-R CALLER ST

$830,000

B: Murray Masonry&More Corp, Tr for

Maurer RT

S: Boston Chimney&Tower Co

25-1/2 DUSTIN ST

$470,000

B: Jacqueline R Marquis

S: Michelle G Theriault Tr, Tr for

Peabody IRT

1303 FOXWOOD CIR U:1303

$510,000

B: Jill M Osborn

S: Andrea H Caggiano

38 GLEN DR

$1,175,000

B: Anthony Lapolla & Meaghan

Lapolla

S: Stefano Bruno

HARDY ST

$100,000

B: Hardy&Munroe LLC

S: Michael Indelicato Tr, Tr for 0 Hardy

Street RT

5 LAKELAND PARK DR

$2,500,000

B: JRM Hauling&Recycling

S: Greenworks Park LLC

6 LEDGEWOOD WAY U:21

$435,000

B: Maureen Dalessandro Tr, Tr for D

Alessandro 2017 T

S: Scialdone Lena M Est & Jeffrey

Brudnick

31 LENOX RD U:1

$360,000

B: Amy Crowley

S: Crowley Marilyn M Est & Edward J

Crowley

570-R LOWELL ST

$355,000

B: Andrew F Cotreau Tr, Tr for Essex

Nursery RT

S: Todd E Forsythe & Tracy Forsythe

Transction information is compiled from the Registry of Deeds and is provided under copyright by Banker & Tradesman

via www.bankerandtradesman.com

LEGAL AD

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

otice is hereby given that the City Council of the City of Peabody, acting as the

pecial Permit Granting Authority, will conduct a public hearing on THURSDAY

VENING, JUNE 23, 2022, at 7:30 P.M., in the Frank L. Wiggin Auditorium, 24

owell Street, Peabody, MA, and remotely via Zoom, on the application from RON

OYD, 2 Harvard Street, Peabody, MA for a SPECIAL PERMIT REQUESTING TO

PERATE AN AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SERVICE FACILITY SPECIALIZING IN

OTORCYCLE REPAIR AND SALES IN A GBD ZONING DISTRICT at 27 HOWLEY

TREET, Peabody, MA as filed in accordance with Sections 1.5.1, 6.1 and 15.7 of

he Peabody Zoning Ordinance.

For remote participation using the Zoom platform, please visit

ww.peabody-ma.gov under "Calendar" on the home page or contact the City

lerk's office.

EEKLY NEWS: June 9 and 16, 2022

LEGALS

PEABODY CITY COUNCIL

COUNCILLOR RYAN MELVILLE

CITY COUNCIL PRESIDENT

Allyson M. Danforth

City Clerk

LEGALS

LEGAL AD

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Notice is hereby given that the CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF PEABODY will

conduct a PUBLIC HEARING on THURSDAY EVENING, JUNE 23, 2022, at 7:30

P.M., in the Wiggin Auditorium, City Hall, 24 Lowell Street, Peabody, MA, and

remotely via Zoom, in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 40A, Section 5 of

the Massachusetts General Laws TO CONSIDER AMENDING THE ZONING

ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF PEABODY as follows:

SECTION ONE: That the Zoning Map of the City of Peabody entitled, City of

Peabody Zoning Map Adopted April 28, 2011, as amended, is hereby further

amended as follows:

To include within the Mill Overlay District the following location:

Assessors Map 053, Parcel 087 and numbered 58 Pulaski Street

SECTION TWO: All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent herewith are

hereby repealed.

SECTION THREE: This ordinance shall take effect as provided by law.

For remote participation using the Zoom platform, please visit

www.peabody-ma.gov under "Calendar" on the home page or contact the City

Clerk's office.

PEABODY CITY COUNCIL

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE ORDINANCE ESTABLISHING A

CLASSIFICATION AND COMPENSATION PLAN FOR CITY OFFICERS AND

EMPLOYEES OF THE CODE OF THE CITY OF PEABODY

BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF PEABODY AS

FOLLOWS:

SECTION ONE: That the Code of the City of Peabody adopted on January 23,

1969, as amended, for Section 18-20, Paragraph 15 Schedule of Compensation

for Part-Time Positions is hereby further amended as follows:

By deleting the following:

LEGALS

Section 18-20 Schedule of Compensation for Part-Time Positions:

16.c Clerk $170.00 daily

16.g Deputy Clerk $150.00

16.h Deputy Warden $150.00

16.i Inspector-Precinct $125.00

16.m Warden $170.00

16.l Tab Clerk Precinct $75.00

16.k Tab Clerk City Wide $150.00

16.n Precinct Assistant $160.00

And inserting in place thereof the following:

Legal Notice

There will be a Tree Removal Hearing on Friday June 24, 2022 @ 9:00am at

he Recreation, Parks & Forestry Department office located at 50 Farm Avenue,

eabody, MA, for the removal of a Public Shade Tree(s) at the following

ocation(s).

ddress: 4 Roycroft Road As per the petition of (Robert Dunn)

Peabody, MA 01960

Per Order of Brian Grant, Tree Warden

TEM: June 16 and 23, 2022

LEGAL AD

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

otice is hereby given that the City Council of the City of Peabody, acting as the

pecial Permit Granting Authority, will conduct a public hearing on THURSDAY

VENING, JUNE 23, 2022, at 7:30 P.M., in the Frank L. Wiggin Auditorium, 24

owell Street, Peabody, MA, and remotely via Zoom, on the application from

HARLES E. HOLDEN, 91 Lynnfield Street, Peabody, MA for a SPECIAL PERMIT

EQUESTING TO REMOVE THE EXISTING PROPANE FILLING STRUCTURE AND

EPLACE THE SAME WITH A NEW ONE STORY STRUCTURE at said 91

YNNFIELD STREET, Peabody, MA as filed in accordance with Sections 4.2.5, 6.1

nd 15.7 of the Peabody Zoning Ordinance.

For remote participation using the Zoom platform, please visit

ww.peabody-ma.gov under "Calendar" on the home page or contact the City

lerk's office.

EEKLY NEWS: June 9 and 16, 2022

PEABODY CITY COUNCIL

COUNCILLOR RYAN MELVILLE

CITY COUNCIL PRESIDENT

Allyson M. Danforth

City Clerk

WEEKLY NEWS: June 9 and 16, 2022

Call 781-593-7700 ext. 2

to subscribe today.

Have a story to share?

Need a question answered?

contactus@essexmedia.group

LEGAL AD

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Notice is hereby given that the City Council of the City of Peabody will conduct a

public hearing on THURSDAY EVENING, JUNE 23, 2022, at 7:30 P.M., in the

Frank L. Wiggin Auditorium, 24 Lowell Street, Peabody, MA, and remotely via Zoom

on the application from RON BOYD D/B/A BOYD CYCLES, INC., 27 Howley

Street, Peabody, MA REQUESTING USE OF A CLASS 2 MOTOR VEHICLE LICENSE

at said 27 HOWLEY STREET, Peabody, MA.

For remote participation using the Zoom platform, please visit

www.peabody-ma.gov under "Calendar" on the home page or contact the City

Clerk's office.

WEEKLY NEWS: June 9 and 16, 2022

PEABODY CITY COUNCIL

COUNCILLOR RYAN MELVILLE

CITY COUNCIL PRESIDENT

Allyson M. Danforth

City Clerk

PEABODY CITY COUNCIL

COUNCILLOR RYAN MELVILLE

CITY COUNCIL PRESIDENT

Allyson M. Danforth

City Clerk

home delivery rate is

50% off

newstand price!

Subscribers pay only

$4.50 a week.

Section 18-20, Paragraph 15 Schedule of Compensation for Part-Time

Positions:

16.c Clerk $225.00 daily

16.g Deputy Clerk $200.00

16.h Deputy Warden $200.00

16.i Inspector-Precinct $150.00

16.m Warden $225.00

16.l Tab Clerk Precinct $75.00

16.k Tab Clerk City Wide $150.00

16.n Precinct Assistant $160.00

SECTION TWO: All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent herewith are

hereby repealed.

SECTION THREE: This ordinance shall take effect as provided by law.

INTRODUCED MAY 26, 2022

ORDERED PUBLISHED JUNE 9, 2022

PUBLISHED JUNE 16, 2022

WEEKLY NEWS: June 16, 2022

PEABODY PLANNING BOARD

Notice is hereby given that the PLANNING BOARD OF THE CITY OF PEABODY will

conduct a PUBLIC HEARING on THURSDAY EVENING, JULY 7TH, 2022, at 7:00

P.M., in the Wiggin Auditorium, City Hall, 24 Lowell Street, Peabody, MA in

accordance with the provisions of Chapter 40A, Section 5 of the Massachusetts

General Laws TO CONSIDER AMENDING THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY

OF PEABODY as follows:

BE IT ORDAINED by the City Council of the City of Peabody as follows:

That the Zoning Ordinance of the City of Peabody entitled Zoning Ordinance -

2011, as amended, is hereby further amended as follows:

SECTION ONE: That the Zoning Map of the City of Peabody entitled, City of

Peabody Zoning Map Adopted April 28, 2011, as amended, is hereby further

amended as follows:

To include within the Mill Overlay District the following location:

Assessors Map 053, Parcel 087 and numbered 58 Pulaski Street

SECTION TWO: All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent herewith are

hereby repealed.

SECTION THREE: This ordinance shall take effect as provided by law.

For remote participation using the Zoom platform, please visit

www.peabody-ma.gov under "Calendar" on the home page or contact the City

Clerk's office.

PEABODY PLANNING BOARD

THOMAS BETTENCOURT, CHAIRPERSON

WEEKLY NEWS: June 16 and 23, 2022


16

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 781-593-7700 JUNE 16, 2022

DINING GUIDE

DIRECTORY

To advertise here,

contact 781-593-7700,

ext. 1355 or email

advertising@itemlive.com

TWO FUNCTION ROOMS

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT • ONLINE ORDERING

FULL SERVICE DINING ROOM AND LOUNGE

147 SUMMIT ST., PEABODY

978-977-0520 • CAPONESDINING.COM

- MODERN COMFORT FOOD & HANDCRAFTED COCKTAILS -

- FULL MENU TIL 11PM & DRINKS

TIL 1AM EVERY FRIDAY & SATURDAY -

- LIVE COUNTRY MUSIC EVERY FRIDAY & SATURDAY NIGHT -

FACEBOOK.COM/

STANZYSRANCH

WWW.STANZYS.COM

INSTAGRAM.COM/

STANZYSRANCH

LET US DO THE

C oking

Catered Clambakes Are Back!

• We have been catering clambakes

for more than 20 years

• Our menus fit every taste and budget

so you can sit back and relax

978-530-1500

TRY OUR

CLAMBAKES

TO GO

Visit cclobster.com

to learn more and

see our menus or

visit our retail store

at 297 Lynn Street

in Peabody.

Route 114 • Peabody • 978-531-1410

Unexcelled Food & Spirits at Affordable Prices

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner • Take-Out

Off Premise Catering • Epicurean Shop

Order online at www.centuryhousepeabody.com

CHARLIE’S SEAFOOD

188 ESSEX ST., LYNN • 781-595-8953

Since

1961

HANDCRAFTED ITALIAN

MADE TO ORDER HANDCRAFTED MEALS

• Handmade Pastas • Artisan Pizza

• Bread Baked In-House Daily • Areas Best Marinated Steaktips

• Catering • Online Ordering and Delivery

1066 Revere Beach Parkway • Chelsea

(617) 466-2098

michaelgscatering.com

gifts and treats

edible.com

FREE DELIVERY

On all future orders

Same day delivery $9.99

CURBSIDE

PICK-UP

Peabody, MA | 637 Lowell St. (Big Y Plaza) | 978-536-7010

Lynn, MA | 919 Lynnfield St. (Goodwin Circle) | 781-593-1888

Beverly, MA | 45 Enon St. | 978-927-3120

COMING SOON

Brick Oven Pizza and Dining on the Deck

31 Lynnfield Street, Peabody

978-531-9730 • thewardhurst.com

VOTED

Most Iconic Restaurant in Boston Area

-Boston.com

119 Main Street, Route 133, Essex, MA

woodmans.com 978.768.6057

Join us at Tides for

Beachside Casual

Dining!

Over 100 Years & Still The Best

At the end of the

Nahant Causeway

2B Wilson Road, Nahant, 01908

www.tidesnahant.com

“Like” Tides Nahant Beach on

Facebook

Catch the games on our 30 TVs!

Try one of our 30 beers on tap!

Phantom Gourmet’s Great 8 Steak & Cheese!

Full Service Lottery & Keno!

Daily Specials!

Check out our NEW Porch & Picnic Seating!

And so much more!!!

CALL US! 781-593-7500

Ext. 1 for Takeout, Ext. 2 for Reservations

Chicken Sandwich

Try it

today!

N O R T H R E A D I N G L O C A T I O N S : 9 7 8 . 2 7 6 . 0 0 4 4

M I D D L E T O N L O C A T I O N S : 9 7 8 . 6 4 6 . 1 1 1 1

W W W . T E R E S A S E A T E R Y . C O M

BUY ONE, GET ONE FREE

Chicken or Eggplant Parmigiana

Offer good on Thursdays with this coupon until July 28, 2022

Cannot be combined with any other offer

Catch up with your

favorite team

in Item Sports!

Route 1 South, Danvers • 978-774-0707 • supinos.com

Looking for a house?

Check the real estate section!

Looking for past issues?

Find them on weeklynews.net

Hooray! Your file is uploaded and ready to be published.

Saved successfully!

Ooh no, something went wrong!