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q u e e n s l a n d h o T E L S a s s o c i a t i o n

A U G U S T 2 0 1 7 e d i t i o n

gateway

to the north

MAREEBA’S STAR ATTRACTION HAS PEOPLE

FLOCKING FROM NEAR AND FAR

INSIGHTS:

THE WICKHAM HOTEL’S

CONTAINER GARDEN BAR

COMPASS:

LONGREACH, THE HEART OF

QUEENSLAND’S OUTBACK

SHOWCASE:

THE ALCHEMISTS

OF AMBER NECTAR


An integrated

Cook & Chill solution

The Electrolux Cook & Chill system

ensures a simple and intuitive way of

cooking for every kind of professional

kitchen. The integrated system, oven and

blast chiller, represents the ideal solution

for consistently achieving excellent

cooking results.

Use the proper cycle selection to keep

your ingredients and creations deliciously

fresh and perfectly preserved for serving.

At Stoddart we understand that there is

nothing that cannot be improved upon.

Optimise the workflow of the kitchen by

cooking in the oven at your own speed,

then chilling to lock in the freshness of

your creations.


QHA CONTINUED OUR TRADITION OF HOSTING

A REGIONAL COMMITTEE MEETING

I WAS STRUCK BY TWO THEMES

TIME AND TIME AGAIN—

THE MATESHIP WITHIN OUR

INDUSTRY AND THAT A GOOD

IDEA KNOWS NO BOUNDS.

To start this month, the QHA continued our tradition of hosting a Regional

Committee meeting somewhere throughout this fantastic state of ours.

With a travelling group of members and industry partners the QHA had the

opportunity to re-acquaint ourselves with old friends and see first-hand the

devastation caused by Cyclone Debbie to the industry in and around Mackay,

Prosperpine, Bowen and Airlie Beach.

Throughout our tour, I was struck by two themes time and time again—

the mateship within our industry and that a good idea knows no bounds.

The visible lift in spirits of country publicans as some of the biggest and

best operators in our industry simply listened to them and shared wisdom

convinces us why our Association is so important.

Discovery of innovative solutions and the real-world experiences of our

members proved invaluable to all the touring party. Most gratifying was

also the opportunity to host local and state government decision-makers

throughout. Nothing hits home to a politician like the “honest” feedback

from a small businessperson being ruined by poorly implemented

government programs.

Thanks to all of our members that made the trip, hosted us and the industry

partners who support us throughout the year. I trust you will enjoy another

opportunity that this magazine gives you to find your next “good idea”!

BERNIE HOGAN

QHA CHIEF EXECUTIVE/EDITOR


3 EDITOR’S LETTER

5 CONTRIBUTORS

a u g u s t 2 0 1 7 e d i t i o n

QHA

Level 14, 270 Adelaide Street

Brisbane, Queensland 4000

GPO Box 343

Brisbane, Queensland 4001

Phone: 07 3221 6999

1800 177 594

Fax: 07 3221 6649

Web: www.qha.org.au

Email: info@qha.org.au

Office Hours

8.30am – 5.00pm Monday to Friday

Associate Editor

Mr Ben Weston

Email: bweston@qha.org.au

President

Mr Tom McGuire

Senior Vice President

Mr Richard Deery

Vice Presidents

Mr Scott Armstrong

Mr John Douglas

Mr Brad Fitzgibbons

Secretary/Treasurer

Mr Tony Condon

Trustees

Mr Will Cordwell

Mr Peter Britain

Chief Executive and Editor

Mr Bernie Hogan

www.qha.org.au

6 NEWS

16 LATEST & GREATEST

18 FEATURE:

THE GATEWAY HOTEL MAREEBA

30 INSIGHTS:

THE WICKHAM HOTEL

GOONDIWINDI’S VICTORIA HOTEL

42 COMPASS:

LONGREACH, HEART OF THE OUTBACK

46 ACCOMMODATION

48 FOCUS:

MARSHA FRANKLIN, GENERAL MANAGER

GRAND CHANCELLOR PALM COVE

54 TOP DROP

56 SHOWCASE:

CRAFT BEER

RENOVATIONS

62 TRADE DIRECTORY

64 PARTNERS & CORPORATE MEMBERS

QHA REVIEW | 4

QHA REVIEW is published by the Queensland

Hotels Association ABN 54 878 166 941.

All information is correct at time of going to press.

The publishers cannot accept responsibility for

errors in articles or advertisements, or unsolicited

manuscripts, photographs or illustrations.

The opinions and words of the authors do not

necessarily represent those of the publisher. All

rights reserved. Reproduction in part or whole is

strictly prohibited without prior permission.


DAMIAN STEELE

QHA Industry

Engagement

Manager

A hospitality industry

professional with over

30 years’ experience

in liquor, gaming and

operations. Damian

has a strong focus

on compliance and

legislation.

ROSS TIMS

QHA Training and

Safety Manager

Ross manages the

development and

delivery of industry

related training courses

and the provision of

workplace health and

safety services to

QHA member hotels

and other hospitality

venues.

PAUL ST JOHN-WOOD

Membership Officer

Paul is the face of the

Association to many

QHA members as he

travels the length and

breadth of the state

visiting, advising and

assisting publicans.

JUDY HILL

QHA Accommodation

Division Manager

As professional

advocate for the

accommodation sector

of the hotel industry,

Judy advises and

represents members

on matters including

tourism legislation,

marketing strategy,

risk management and

airline regulation.

SARAH TILBY

QHA Employment

Relations Advisor

Sarah previously

worked for national

employer associations

in the housing and

health care industries.

She also worked for the

Queensland Industrial

Relations Commission

in their award

modernisation team.

THE HON YVETTE D’ATH

Attorney-General and

Minister for Justice

and Minister for

Training and Skills

Yvette D’Ath is a

Labor member of the

Legislative Assembly

of Queensland

representing the seat of

Redcliffe.

MIKE SARQUIS

Executive Director of

Liquor and Gaming

Regulation

Mike’s responsibilities

include managing the

gaming and liquor

regulatory licensing and

compliance regimes,

and implementing the

responsible gambling

strategy and harm

minimisation programs.

NICK BAINBRIGGE

State Manager (Qld)

Aristocrat

Nick has a proven

history in wholesale

liquor, electronic

gaming, and hotel and

restaurant operation.

He now heads up the

state team for one

of Australia’s leading

manufacturers of

gaming machines.

BRENDAN O’FARRELL

Chief Executive

Officer, Intrust Super

Brendan is responsible

for overall management

of the fund and

providing advice to the

board of directors. He

passionately believes

education is critical in

super due to the everchanging

nature of the

industry.

CURT SCHATZ

Managing Partner,

Mullins Lawyers

With over 30 years’

experience in property,

liquor and gaming law,

Curt is recognised

as a leader in this

field. He advises

pub, club, nightclub,

restaurant, resort and

accommodation venue

owners and operators.

JEREMY WICHT

Director Hanrick

Curran Chartered

Accountants

Jeremy is a business

advisory director. His

background includes a

stint at ALH as group

analyst performing

detailed business

analysis, budgeting

and capex, and profit

optimisation.

JOHN ROZENTALS

Wine Writer

John Rozentals is a

freelance writer who

has penned travel, food

and wine articles for

a range of Australian

newspapers and

websites including our

very own QHA Review.

QHA REVIEW | 5


NEWS

KENO CELEBRATES 20 YEARS IN THE SUNSHINE STATE

TWO $1 MILLION JACKPOTS & A $60,000 CASH PRIZE GIVEAWAY MARK KENO ANNIVERSARY

QHA REVIEW | 6

It’s been two decades since the game of Keno first

came to Queensland hotels, and patrons are still

winning and grinning after 20 years.

July marked the 20th anniversary of Keno in

Queensland, and celebrations couldn’t have gotten off

to a better start thanks to two $1 million jackpots won

by Queenslanders during the month – the first one

going to patrons of the Wattle Hotel in Upper Coomera

and the other won in Southport.

In 1997, Keno was first offered at pubs and clubs in

the state and the Coast’s Jupiter’s Casino, now The

Star, was the very first to have the game, making the

two Gold Coast jackpots even more auspicious.

The first well-timed jackpot was won by 37 year-old

community carer, Jontel, and her 39 year-old concreter

husband, Mark, on a family night out that changed

their lives forever.

Just two and a half days later, the second $1 million

Queensland jackpot was won by elated New South

Wales holidaymaker, Graham, 69, and his wife, Sue, at

Club Southport.

Keno National Partnerships Manager David Dicker said

the Keno team was thrilled about the haul of jackpots

taken home by Queensland players in 2017, building

on the thousands won over the past two decades.

“Keno has made 17 millionaires so far this year and six

have been Queenslanders,” he said.

“KENO HAS MADE 17 MILLIONAIRES SO FAR

THIS YEAR AND SIX HAVE BEEN QUEENSLANDERS”

“The number of million-plus winners we’ve had is an

indication of just how exciting this game is.”

In addition to giving away more than $2 million in major

jackpots, to celebrate its anniversary, Keno gave away

$60,000 in additional cash prizes to Queenslanders

just for playing their favourite games.

QUEENSLANDERS WIN $26 MILLION ON AVERAGE

EVERY MONTH PLAYING KENO.

Dicker explained that Keno wanted to reward Keno

players during its anniversary by doing what it does

best – giving away cash.

“This was our way of saying thank you to our

customers for their loyalty over the past 20 years,”

he said.


NEWS

WELCOME TO

SERIOUS CONCERNS WITH MANDATORY ID

SCANNING REMAIN

The Queensland Government’s 1 July implementation

of mandatory ID scanning in Safe Night Precincts

(SNPs) for licensees trading after 12am is an illconceived

plan that won’t achieve its desired

outcomes and only places a hefty financial burden

on hoteliers, according to a growing number of vocal

industry insiders.

Several hoteliers in Brisbane SNPs approached by the

Australian Hotelier, expressed serious concerns about

the impact of the policy.

Nick Kalaf, who owns of the Criterion Tavern, said

ID scanning would interfere with the flexibility of his

venue’s trading hours and impose costs.

“Most of the time we don’t pre-determine what time

we shut … we allow the business and turnover to

make that conclusion on any given night,” he said.

“Now we need to factor in the possibility of 10.30pm

closes and the potential of having a security guard

present in the venue to man the ID scanner. Security

companies charge a minimum of four hours and only

licensed security are allowed to man or supervise ID

scanners.”

For Fritzenberger Director Andrew Jeffreys the only

option was to give up late night trading.

“To avoid the unaffordable operational costs of ID

scanning we have surrendered our late-night trading

license and scaled back to midnight from 1 July.

General manager of the Caxton Hotel Alex Farquhar

said that although his venue won’t be adjusting its

trading hours, the implementation of ID scanning was

“nothing short of a nightmare”.

“It is an ill-conceived policy that has been hastily

rushed through by ill-motivated bureaucrats, to the

detriment of the entire hospitality industry

of Queensland.”

In a minor win for the industry, the Government

consented to a slight relaxing of the rules in the

Caxton Street SNP on the night of the Origin decider

at Suncorp Stadium.

Attorney General Yvette D’Ath said the decision came

after the OLGR consulted with police who had public

order concerns with the large crowds and who said

starting scanning at 11pm rather than 10pm would

alleviate pedestrian congestion.

Queues outside venues in the Surfers Paradise

SNP since ID scanning was introduced.

QHA REVIEW | 7


GAMING

with Nick Bainbrigge

NEWS

QHA REVIEW | 8

A MESSAGE

FROM ARISTOCRAT

In the lead up to AGE Aristocrat invites you to

“curve your thinking’ around the possibilities of

games, cabinets, and technology. At AGE, we

will be showcasing our most diverse portfolio

yet, with greater choice and flexibility than ever

before. With a focus this year on delivering the

world’s greatest gaming experience through

our range of innovative and market-leading

products and services, we are confident that

you’ll find the right solutions tailored to

your needs.

Dragon Cash and Dragon Link have

set the Queensland market alight, with

performance in hotels double the market

average since its release last November

(Source: Maxgaming reports June 2017).

As a follow-up to the famous Lightning

series, which features the successful “hold n

spin” feature and scalable bonus prizes, the

Dragon series is living up to its reputation, fast

becoming the best performing product in

the market.

We are thrilled to see that Queensland

continues to maintain strong performance

following the release of our latest games

in the Dragon Cash & Link, Lightning Cash

& Link families. Lightning Link continues

to maintain its foothold with new additions

Bengal Treasures and Wild Chuco seeing

performance at two times floor average in

Queensland hotels.

AGE this year is all about showing off greater

choice and flexibility of content, hardware

and platforms with new cabinets and content

making their debut at the show. Don’t miss

out on getting a glimpse of our latest offerings

at this year’s AGE!

We thank you for your ongoing support and

look forward to seeing you at the show!

PINT-PULLING ROBOT

For anyone who thought pulling the perfect schooner

of ale was an art and not a science – think again.

A group of engineering students in Leeds, England

have devised a pint-pulling robot that takes your

order via keypad and then draws it meticulously into

a glass complete with a perfect head. One thing

yet to be built into the contraption is the ability to

achieve this feat while engaging in friendly banter.

Surely that’s one human element of the industry

that technology will never be able to replace. Check

it out on YouTube (keywords: perfect pint robot)

NASA UNVEILS HOTEL

CONCEPT WITH

UNBEATABLE VIEW

If you’ve got a spare $5M kicking around some time in

the next 10 years why not book a two-week holiday at

the MARINA? The Managed, Reconfiguarble, In-space

Nodal Assembly is an MIT space accommodation

concept NASA took a liking to after holding a

competition to design the world’s first orbiting hotel.

Complete with a shuttle docking bay and inflatable

rooms, NASA hopes the MARINA will replace the

International Space Station by 2025 and be used as a

stop-over for the first travellers to Mars. The MIT team

estimated the design will reduce the space agency’s

costs by $3 billion a year with a commercial operator

generating revenue from the hotel.


NEWS

NEW GENERAL

MANAGER JOINS

ACCOLADE WINES

Accolade Wines has appointed a new general

manager with a wealth of experience in the

wine industry.

Chris Flaherty has over 30 years’ experience in all

alcohol beverage categories. He was formerly Chief

Executive Officer of ASM Liquor, prior to which he

was Managing Director Australia and New Zealand at

Treasury Wine Estates, and earlier he held a number of

positions at Diageo.

His appointment as Accolade Wines General Manager,

Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific, will be effective

from 28 August 2017.

Based in Sydney, Chris Flaherty will report to Accolade

Wine’s Executive Chairman, Jim Anderson.

“We are very pleased to have Chris join the senior

executive team and his leadership experience coupled

with a deep knowledge of the market will be a great

benefit to Accolade,” Jim said.

“IT IS A GREAT HONOUR AND PRIVILEGE TO BE

LEADING THE ANZP TEAM AT ACCOLADE WINES

WITH ITS PORTFOLIO OF WONDERFUL BRANDS,

STEEPED IN AN AMAZING WINE HERITAGE”

Damian Steele, Matt Scott, James Brindley

and Bernie Hogan.

GREAT TO BE A

QUEENSLANDER

And so it was, another State of Origin series

and another Queensland triumph. Eleven series

wins from the last twelve years is pretty special

so it was fitting to celebrate the win with a

couple of special edition XXXX QUEENSLANDER

cans with Queensland legend, Matt Scott, who

unfortunately missed this year’s series due to

injury, and Lion Nathan’s Managing Director of

Beer, Wine and Spirits Australia, James Brindley.

Joining them for a few very enjoyable coldies was

QHA Chief Executive, Bernie Hogan and QHA

Industry Engagement Manager, Damian Steele.

Some might say is this “Important news?”, it is

if you are a Queenslander and why not take one

more opportunity to rub it into our cockroach

mates from down south, who seemingly can’t

play rugby league anymore.

INTERSTATE BEER EXPORT

As Aussies, pushing the boundaries of

ridiculousness is something of a birthright. So

when a bloke recently checked in a tinny of Emu

Export as his only luggage on a QANTAS flight

from Melbourne to Perth, baggage handlers were

only too happy to oblige and the interstate ale

duly arrived on the WA carousel. Speaking to the

Daily Mail, the beer-loving jet-setter “Dean” said he

wasn’t sure his luggage would make it. “My mate

works at the airport and we hatched the plan as

a laugh — I half didn’t expect it to come out the

other end.”

QHA REVIEW | 9


NEWS

TAKE ME TO THE RIVER

QHA REVIEW | 10

If there was ever a venue which was built for the sole

purpose of enjoying our magnificent river, Riverland

(as it is aptly named) would be it. Purpose built

to maximise the view of Brisbane’s snaking river,

Riverland will sit perched high at the rear of Emirates

House at 167 Eagle St, boasting Brisbane’s biggest

river frontage. This is a venue for everybody and for

any occasion. Whether you’re enjoying a catch-up

after work, afternoon sun downers or a bite to eat,

Riverland promises to be the perfect social outing.

The company behind Riverland, Open Arms

Hospitality, has operated a string of venues, bars and

hotels across Victoria and New South Wales. They

know how to create memorable venues with a great

offering and a focus on the customer experience.

Architects, Burton & Carter are responsible for this

sprawling design which will have a commanding

presence on Brisbane’s riverbank. Entry will be via

a timber arbour with greenery intertwined, set to be

constructed along the existing external entry to the

plaza.

Part owner and venue manager Gerard Coakley said,

“This is a venue built for everybody to enjoy Brisbane’s

great river, beverages and authentic street food.

“It’s all about the location, while the converted shipping

containers to an island bar and greenery will create

an intimate tropical atmosphere, the focus at all times

is the Brisbane River. With rotating food vendors

and entertainment, no two nights will be the same at

Riverland.”

The bar will feature a large range of beer and ciders

including domestic lagers, international premiums,

craft and micro brewed specialities with an emphasis

on local breweries. The Box Brand are building three

20ft shipping containers converted into five street

kitchens. With four rotating food vendors and one

permanent, there’s sure to be something for everyone.

With a key emphasis on functions, the venue has

been thoughtfully designed to cater for all types and

sizes. The centrepiece of Riverland will be two 40ft

containers converted into a giant island bar, while the

five individual kitchens will create a food truck street

vibe with patrons able to choose from a wide variety of

tasty eats. Existing trees onsite will be retained adding

a subtropical feel to the space.

Casual in its approach and ambience, Riverland will

have a highly vibrant, energetic and festive atmosphere

which will appeal to a wide audience. Low key music

will form the backdrop to the venue during the day,

with acoustic artists and DJs performing over the

weekend. All entertainment will be at a sound level that

allows for socialising and talking with friends, to set

a mood rather than dominate a space. Riverland will

start construction this month with an open date set for

sometime this Spring.


NEWS

KARALEE TAVERN

WINS ‘BEST PUB

GRUB’ IN IPSWICH

Although we live in the age of the gastropub with

its sophisticated take on changing tastes, it seems

there’s still a bit of a hankering out there for more

traditional pub grub.

And if responses to The Queensland Times’ recent

City Pride Facebook poll is anything to go by,

enthusiasm for the schnitty, parmigianas, steak

sandwich or crumbed-seafood-and-chips-with-a

dash-of-salad variety of nosh is as strong as ever –

especially when it’s done well.

Voting was busy and the quality of the Karalee

Tavern’s offering eventually made it a hands-down

winner among Ipswich locals online.

Manager Padriac Gorman told the Queensland

Times that the venue made every effort to produce

memorable food.

“You’ll never get anything frozen or pre-made at

our tavern. Sauces, chips, batter... all made on the

premises,” he said. “We have always sourced our

meat from a supplier in Toowoomba, along with

getting our produce direct from the Rocklea markets

for the past five years. We’ve always taken great

pride in the quality of our food, and since taking

over the pub we’ve made a big effort to establish it

as a great place to eat.”

And some quick advice on how to perform well in

the hotel industry …

“You don’t need to overcomplicate things with a

pub. Just be consistent with the food, have happy,

interactive, motivated staff, cold beer and to keep

your customers happy.”

QHA REVIEW | 11


RM00230AB


NEWS

NEWS

COAST CELEBRATES

50 YEARS OF SUNSHINE

Expanding its international airport, plans for major

new hotels and tourism attractions and blueprints for

new town centres are all part of the Sunshine Coast’s

commitment to growth as it celebrates the 50th

anniversary of its official name. Until 1 August 1967,

the region was known as the “Near North Coast”,

reflecting its proximity to Brisbane.

However, with the region’s rapid growth in population

and tourism, the Maroochydore, Noosa and

Landsborough shires all wanted a more enticing

identity - and the “Sunshine Coast” was born.

The origin of the name was summed up at the time by

a tourism official, Mr R.M. O’Loughlin, who remarked

that: “This area had something that could not be

bought for gold: that was glorious sunshine”.

Today the Sunshine Coast is Queensland’s fastest

growing tourism destination with a population of

300,000 that’s forecast to expand to over 500,000

by 2031.

The region has its own university and the Sunshine

Coast Airport was recently designated an international

airport, with a major extension and upgrade underway

to enable it to attract an even wider range of domestic

and international flights.

A series of anniversary events over the next five

months include concerts, the largest ever Horizons

Arts Festival, a poetry trail, sand sculpture festival

and a special commemorative exhibition retracing the

region’s development.

Sunshine Coast Council Mayor Mark Jamieson said

the 50-year milestone allowed the region to celebrate

SUNSHINE COAST COUNCIL MAYOR MARK

JAMIESON SAID THE 50-YEAR MILESTONE

ALLOWED THE REGION TO CELEBRATE ITS UNIQUE

IDENTITY BY SHOWCASING THE PAST, PRESENT

AND FUTURE

its unique identity by showcasing the past, present

and future.

“The exciting program of events, which will be held

from August to December, will appeal to a broad range

of ages and interests.”

Visit Sunshine Coast CEO, Simon Latchford, said

that it was remarkable to look back and see how the

region had developed as one of Australia’s premier

tourist destinations.

“The Sunshine Coast has always concentrated on

showcasing its diversity: we are far more than just

Sunshine and Coast, with our distinctive natural

attractions, such as the Hinterland and Glass House

Mountains, complementing our beautiful coastal

attractions,” he said.

“We invite the whole of Australia and the rest of

the world to join us in the celebrations. Everyone

is welcome.”

Full details of the anniversary celebrations can be

found at www.sunshinecoast.qld.gov.au/fifty.

QHA REVIEW | 13


NEWS

A DAY AT THE RACES

QHA REVIEW | 14

Over 200 industry friends including QHA hoteliers,

suppliers and corporate partners enjoyed a breezy July

afternoon at the Aristocrat and QHA Race Day.

QHA wishes to thank Nick Bainbrigge and the team

from Aristocrat, as principal sponsor, for ensuring a

relaxing day of good company, great punting and

fine hospitality.

The Association is also grateful for the support from

Carlton & United Breweries, Lion, Diageo, Coca-Cola

Amatil, Accolade Wines, Sirromet, Treasury Wine

Estates, Yalumba and entertainment maestros Nightlife

for providing the perfect assortment of sounds.

Thanks also to PFD Food Services for supplying

hundreds of fresh oysters that were eaten on the day.

As part of the festivities UBET provided punting

vouchers for all attendees and lucky door prizes

included a trip for two to the Melbourne Cup courtesy

of Sky Racing, $400 of betting vouchers from Keno, a

magnum of Pol Roger from Yalumba and wine and a

gift voucher from ALM.

Relaxing at the races: QHA Senior Vice President

Richard Deery, Labor MP for Griffith Terri Butler and

QHA President Tom McGuire.


NEWS

QHA REVIEW | 15


LATEST & GREATEST

ONE FOR THE BOOKS

With our craft beer focus this edition, we

thought it best to showcase all things great

in the world of these alchemists of the amber

nectar. What better place to start than with

Brisbane’s longest running craft beer bar,

the Archive Beer Boutique in West End.

BEER-CYCLING

And what better way to transport your growler home

than by bike and to do that you need a handy carry

case. Here’s a leather one from www.scoutmob.com

GROWLERS & SQUEELERS

Are all the rage and we are not talking about a

scene from Deliverance. These flagons are used

to take your fresh draught beer home, beers that

are often not available in bottles or cans. A growler

is 1.89l and a squeeler 945ml and they come in

all kinds of designs. Check out these Cannonball

growlers. www.terracottarepublic.com

QHA REVIEW | 16

THE FONT OF

KNOWLEDGE

It may not be but these

custom beer fonts are

something truly out of

the ordinary from

www.tappedbeer.com


FEATURE

GATEWAY TO

THE NORTH

A YEAR SINCE RENOVATIONS WERE COMPLETED,

THE GATEWAY HOTEL IS PROVING A MASSIVE HIT

WITH LOCALS AND VISITORS ALIKE.

An hour’s drive inland from Cairns, Mareeba is perhaps

best known for their rodeo, coffee plantations and as a

place to stock up before tackling road trips to remote

Far North Queensland. The town however has a new

talking point now and if the rave customer reviews

online are anything to go by, The Gateway Hotel is

making a name for itself as a destination in its own

right.

Formerly known as The Peninsula Pub, the building

was purchased by Rock Ridge Farming, owned by

Peter and Chelley Howe in April 2015. The couple

saw an opportunity to develop the business and fill a

perceived void in the Tablelands hotel market. They

were partnered in the venture by Chelley’s cousin

Callum Foo and his wife Nerida, who had been

working in hotels down in Brisbane.

In May 2015, the newly formed partnership set about

renovating the hotel. In what could be best described

as a tip of the Akubra to their farming heritage, the

design reflects a fusion of rustic outback décor with

a modern contemporary vibe. Callum elaborated on

the inspiration behind the refurbishment and the local

materials used.

QHA REVIEW | 19


QHA REVIEW | 20


FEATURE

“THE VISION WAS TO PROVIDE MAREEBA RESIDENTS WITH A HOTEL THEY’RE PROUD TO

CALL THEIR LOCAL, AND VISITORS WITH A VENUE THAT HAS ALL THE STYLINGS OF A BIG

CITY HOTEL AND THE CHARACTER AND CHARM OF A COUNTRY PUB”

“Peter and Chelley have a strong farming background,

and Mareeba is a proud farming community so

we tried to carry this theme through the hotels

refurbishment. Kind of old and new agricultural

theming with new hotel/ pub/ restaurant experiences.

“The vision was to provide Mareeba residents with a

hotel they’re proud to call their local, and visitors with

a venue that has all the stylings of a big city hotel and

the character and charm of a country pub.

“All of the feature photos around the hotel are taken

from local farms around the Tablelands. The large

John Deere pic actually starts up every hour on the

hour and is a huge attraction to the kids, both young

and old!

“We have made feature lighting from local farmers’

hessian potato bags with logos of old and current

potato growers. All the rusty corrugated iron is

recycled from a 50-year old seed drying shed, locally

sourced. The windmill that features in the gardens

comes from Peter and Chelley’s farm in Tinaroo. ‘Big

Red’, which is the name of the middle bar, is a twotonne

piece of Red Stringybark sourced locally in the

Tablelands.”

High ceilings feature throughout the pub along with

timber floors, stone panels and leather couches. The

Gateway indeed has all the hallmarks of a classic

Queensland country pub. Consequently, the renovation

has been rightfully entered into the HIA Building

Awards by Higham Building, owned by locals Simon

and Kristy Higham. Wherever possible they engaged

local tradesman on the project.

The hotel features two bars, Stockman’s Grill

restaurant, three kids’ areas and Big Time Charlie’s,

the gaming room with 14 new gaming machines

including Lightning Link and Dragon Link. The

Gateway even has a coffee window operating out

of the front of the hotel, selling takeaway coffees,

smoothies and wraps called the Buzz Bar. Interestingly,

over 70% of Australia’s coffee crop is grown in

Mareeba. In the not-too-distant future there are plans

to renovate the drive thru.

Upstairs is the refurbished backpackers’

accommodation which sleeps up to 48 people

with shaded, wraparound verandas and shared

couches, chairs and tables in keeping with the style

of a traditional Queenslander. The Gateway provides

work, transport and accommodation packages for

backpackers.

On the entertainment side of things there is plenty

of it, in particular their legendary Phat Fridays that

once a month feature a guest DJ from Brisbane,

Sydney, Melbourne and even Los Angeles. The event

draws huge crowds giving young Tablelanders and

backpackers alike a genuine option to party locally.

The hotel also holds regular functions ranging from

fashion shows to wine degustations and their annual

Australia Day Toad Race Charity Event.

QHA REVIEW | 21


FEATURE

The Gateway caters for families as well. The three

designated kids’ areas, two of which are named after

Callum and Nerida’s children Miriam and Angus, are

Gus Bus, with toys suitable for 1-4 years of age; Mim’s

Farm containing a range of play equipment, games

and toys suitable for children 4-12 years of age; and

for the teenagers there’s a special projector room

screening kids’ friendly programs and movies. Callum

explained their desire to be recognised as a familyfriendly

venue.

“At The Gateway we’re family, as in we have a family

and want to become one of our customers’ favourite

family gathering places.

“We know what it’s like with little people, that’s why we

have gone to such lengths to create their own special

spaces so kids can have as much fun as their parents.

Our menu is children friendly and features fresh, chef

prepared and locally sourced produce with a few

sneaky healthy options.”

This focus on fresh produce is replicated in the menu

for adults. The Stockman’s Grill prides itself on chef

prepared fresh modern cuisine, including steaks and

produce sourced across the Tablelands.

“We’re proud of this region, it’s the food bowl for

Tropical North Queensland. We’re taking the farm

gate to plate philosophy on board. Our meat is from

Walkamin, Morganbury Meats and we’re sourcing as

much local produce as we can.”

Mareeba is famous for growing avocados, mangoes,

lychees, longans, sugar cane, cashews, macadamias,

“WE’RE PROUD OF THIS REGION, IT’S THE FOOD

BOWL FOR TROPICAL NORTH QUEENSLAND. WE’RE

TAKING THE FARM GATE TO PLATE PHILOSOPHY

ON BOARD”

QHA REVIEW | 22


QHA REVIEW | 23


FEATURE

QHA REVIEW | 24

bananas, pineapples and a variety of vegetables and

tropical fruits. Poultry and cattle are also common.

The Gateway’s focus on fresh food appears to have

proven popular with diners. Comments online range

from, “The visit was an amazing surprise. The staff

were friendly, the atmosphere was good and the food

was top quality” and “was impressed by the decor,

friendly attentive staff, menu selections and wine list” to

“friendly welcome and service, good menu, good food.

If you are visiting Mareeba, this is the place to dine.” In

fact, there are countless complimentary reviews about

the quality of the fare.

The team at The Gateway have no doubt successfully

married big city pizzaz with the down-to-earth appeal

of a country pub.

“We’re proud to be a part of Mareeba and the

Tablelands community. We’re working hard to give the

people of the region a venue they can be proud of.

We are striving to provide old fashioned service and

a sophisticated pub that many will love to call their

‘local’.”

“WE ARE STRIVING TO PROVIDE OLD FASHIONED

SERVICE AND A SOPHISTICATED PUB THAT MANY

WILL LOVE TO CALL THEIR ‘LOCAL’”


MP ATTORNEY GENERAL The Hon. Yvette D’Ath

ID SCANNER SCHEME LAUNCHED

QHA REVIEW | 26

Networked ID scanners have been officially operating

in more than 190 venues in Queensland’s 15 safe

night precincts (SNPs) since 1 July. They are a key

component of the Queensland Government’s strategy

to tackle alcohol-fuelled violence and are designed to

ensure people with banning orders are detected and

prevented entry into venues operating ID scanners.

Keeping known trouble makers out of our pubs helps

ensure Queenslanders and tourists can have a safe,

fun night out.

The ID scanners are already proving their worth by

alerting security staff to a number of banned patrons

attempting to enter venues and allowing police to

investigate and take action for the banning order

contraventions.

I am grateful to licensees and patrons for embracing

the ID scanner scheme and helping keep our venues

safe places.

If this system prevented only one family from dealing

with the aftermath of a senseless violent tragedy, it is

already worth it.

RESPONSIBLE GAMBLING AWARENESS WEEK 2017

Responsible Gambling Awareness Week (RGAW)

was held in Queensland from 24-30 July with the

theme ‘Is your gambling getting out of hand? Think of

your family’. RGAW is held annually and encourages

gamblers to stay within their limits and highlights the

support available to people who feel gambling may

have become a problem.

I was encouraged to hear of those gaming licensees

who got involved and supported this year’s event and

thank you for your efforts.

As a gambling provider, it’s in your best interest to be

familiar with the Queensland Responsible Gambling

Code of Practice which provides a whole-ofindustry

approach to the promotion and provision of

responsible gambling practices.

You want your patrons to see and experience your

venue as one that provides a safe, socially responsible

and supportive gambling environment.

You also want your patrons to feel like they are able to

approach staff at your venue for assistance with any

gambling problems.

Resource manuals have been designed specifically

for hotels and provide a step-by-step guide to

implementing the Code of Practice. You can download

these from the Queensland Publications Portal at

www.publications.qld.gov.au.

Hosted by Relationships Australia at the Newnham

Hotel, Mt Gravatt, this year’s RGAW official launch was

attended by industry stakeholders, Gambling Help

counsellors, researchers, community members and

government representatives.

The launch also provided an opportunity for

those present to preview the new Gambling Help

Queensland website, which is to be launched soon.

Keep an eye out for the website which features

information on the signs of problem gambling, facts

and myths, feature stories, plus an information section

especially for industry.

Gambling Help services across Queensland organised

a number of community events and activities in their

local area.

I commend the efforts of gambling providers and the

work of Queensland Gambling Help services, as we

join together to reduce the negative impact gambling

may have on Queenslanders now and into the future.

FUNDING FOR COMMUNITY ORGANISATIONS

Congratulations to the 604 community groups who

shared in $12.4 million of funding in the latest round of

the Gambling Community Benefit Fund (GCBF).

Grants in round 93 are currently being considered,

while applications for round 94 will close on

31 August 2017.

In the 2016-17 financial year, more than 900

community groups across Queensland shared in close

to $40 million in grants.

The successful recipients included sports clubs,

schools, emergency services organisations, charity

groups, music societies and health and

support centres.

The 2016-17 financial year also saw the launch of the

new GCBF user-friendly online portal, which has made

applying for funding even easier.


Michael Sarquis

OLGR

0FFICE OF LIQUOR AND GAMING REGULATION UPDATE

LICENCE FEES ARE NOW OVERDUE

If you haven’t paid your liquor licence fees, they are now

overdue and your liquor licence has been suspended.

If you hold a gaming machine licence, it has also

been suspended.

I remind you that you are unable to sell or supply liquor

while your licence is suspended.

To avoid a compliance officer knocking on your door

and you potentially copping a hefty fine, login to the

OLGR Client Portal immediately to easily pay your fees.

Of course, you can also pay via BPay, or other payment

methods, using the payment details shown on your

licence fee assessment.

You have 28 days from the date of suspension to pay

your licence fees. This means, if the fees are not paid by

12 midnight on 29 August your licence will automatically

be cancelled, creating potentially serious consequences

for your business.

If you need to contact an OLGR licensing officer, email

olgrlicensing@justice.qld.gov.au.

UPDATED SIGNS AND ON-THE-SPOT FINES

We want you to comply with legislation to avoid the

expense and inconvenience of receiving a fine or

penalty.

Under the Liquor Act 1992 and the Wine Industry Act

1994, licensees, their staff and patrons can be issued

on-the-spot fines (also called penalty infringement

notices, or PINs) for non-compliance offences. Some

offences include:

• Engaging in unacceptable practices/promotions;

• Supplying alcohol to someone that is unduly

intoxicated or disorderly;

• Allowing non-exempt minors on your premises;

• Failing to comply with licence conditions; and

• Allowing people trying to enter a licensed venue

using a false ID.

We provide a full list of on-the-spot fines on our website

to help you and your staff understand the reasons for,

and amounts of, on-the-spot fines.

Fines are calculated by penalty units and from 1 July

2017, the current value of each penalty unit is $126.15.

To advise your staff and patrons what is acceptable

and expected, you can download, print and display

free in-venue signage for liquor licensees at

your licensed venue, which are also available on

our website.

SPOTLIGHT ON BUNDABERG SNP INTER-VENUE

RADIO NETWORK

In late 2016, the Safe Night Bundaberg CBD Precinct

Inc. set up an inter-venue, two-way radio network

within the precinct with grant funding of $17,127.

All 10 late-night licensed venues in the precinct have

a radio, as well as the taxi marshal and police station.

Communication between venues and with on-duty

police is fast and efficient with all parties able to listen

to dialogue on the one radio channel.

Since its introduction, the network has generated

positive feedback from users and resulted in faster

response times by police.

The board adopted the inter-venue radios which

“are seen as an important tool in assisting with

the reduction of alcohol-fuelled violence, antisocial

behaviour, improvement of inter-venue communication

and proactive policing.” said Susan Rewald, Secretary

of the Safe Night Bundaberg CBD Precinct Inc.

local board.

Licensees within the Bundaberg SNP are actively

involved in finding ways to improve the safety of late

night patrons and venue staff. Since the board’s

establishment, it has received over $210,600 worth of

SNP funding, including:

• Seed funding for insurance, OFT annual

association returns, auditing and administrative

tasks; and

• Operational funding for an educational campaign,

taxi rank security, CCTV upgrades, ‘One Punch

Can Kill’ campaign, two-day course aimed at

disadvantaged youth focussing on RSA training

and the inter-venue radio network.

I congratulate the Bundaberg SNP licensees on the

success of the inter-venue radio initiative and their

commitment to the safety of their patrons and staff.

QHA REVIEW | 27


LEGAL MATTERS with Curt Schatz

IS MONEY LAUNDERING OCCURRING

IN YOUR HOTEL?

QHA REVIEW | 28

Money laundering is more common through gaming

machines than many licensees realise and many

hotels underestimate the risk of money laundering in

their venue. The Australian Transaction Reports and

Analysis Centre (AUSTRAC) have identified hotels

as vulnerable targets for money laundering practices

through their recent campaigns. All hotels with gaming

machines should be aware of their Anti-Money

Laundering and Counter-Terrorism Financing (AML/

CTF) reporting obligations and the requirement for

them to have a compliant AML/CTF plan.

Accordingly, AUSTRAC has developed the following

tips for hotels in protecting themselves against

money laundering:

1. Hotels need to ensure that they are not taking

a “one-size fits all” approach to identifying and

managing money laundering risks. Rather, each

hotel should have a specific AML/CTF program in

place which is tailored specifically to the hotel. This

should address the way that a hotel will respond

to money laundering and the associated risks

surrounding AML/CTF.

2. It is important for hotels to realise that money

laundering can still occur when a patron plays all of

the money they deposit. Criminals are increasingly

willing to lose a percentage of their deposit as

a cost of money laundering. Venues cannot rely

on the fact that a patron is playing the gaming

machines as evidence that money laundering is not

occurring in their venue. Accordingly, it is critical

that hotels have a transaction monitoring program

that can address this type of money laundering.

Through analysing the data collected by this

program, hotels should be reporting customers

who receive a high number of gaming payouts over

a specific period.

3. Hotels should note that money launderers are often

regular customers. While it is important to build

strong relationships with customers, licensees

should be constantly monitoring their hotel for

suspicious activity. AUSTRAC has advised that this

can include customers who are buying winning

tickets/cheques, asking for cheques to be written

in someone else’s name and regularly bringing very

large amounts of cash to gamble.

4. Hotels have specific record keeping obligations

under the Anti-Money Laundering and Counter-

Terrorism Financing Act 2006. It is critical for hotels

to maintain accurate records of transactions.

AUSTRAC recommends that these records are

kept electronically, making monitoring transactions

under your monitoring program easier.

5. It is important for hotels to be reporting any

suspicious matters to AUSTRAC and taking their

AML/CTF responsibilities seriously. Your hotel will

not get into trouble for reporting to AUSTRAC and

where there is no criminal activity, the customer will

not be adversely affected. However, a hotel can be

fined if they do not comply with the requirements

under the Anti-Money Laundering and Counter-

Terrorism Financing Act. This includes having

a compliant AML/CTF program in place and

reporting suspicious matters in their venues.

We can assist you in tailoring a compliant program for

you. Please give me a call at Mullins Lawyers on

(07) 3224 0230 if you would like any assistance.


you’re invited

TO A PRESENTATION EVENING

AS WE SHOWCASE THE TALENT AND INNOVATION

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WITH THE 2017 QHA AWARDS FOR EXCELLENCE

join us

WEDNESDAY 4 OCTOBER 2017

BRISBANE CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTRE

TICKETS ON SALE MONDAY 21ST AUGUST

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QHA REVIEW | 29


QHA REVIEW | 30

INSIGHTS


INSIGHTS

MELTING POT

GATHERS IN THE

GARDEN

TAKE A HOTEL CARPARK, FIT IT OUT WITH A COUPLE

OF SHIPPING CONTAINERS, SOME CRAWLING

GREENERY AND A BIT OF MOOD LIGHTING AND

THERE YOU HAVE IT - A MODERN, UNPRETENTIOUS

AND UNIQUE SOCIAL HUB.

It was as simple as that for The Wickham’s incredible

urban oasis with a simple name - Garden Bar - winner

of the 2016 QHA Award for Excellence for Best

Outdoor/Non-Enclosed Facility.

Nestled in the centre of two reconditioned shipping

containers and two brick walls, the design of Garden

Bar separates you from the street without losing that

open-air feel. With a ceiling of festoon lighting and

gardens climbing the brick walls, the Fortitude Valley

bar is an idyllic representation of the urban landscape

in which it lives.

One of the containers is fitted out as the kitchen,

another as a lounge area plus a smaller container

stacked high above Garden Bar where DJs can settle

in and entertain the crowds.

Evident in both design and practice is the huge focus

on community and staying local, from the two-storey

high masterpiece gifted to The Wickham from Brisbane

artist Lister, to the gardens filled with fresh produce

which all are welcome to. Communal dining has also

been embraced with long shared tables catering for 24

diners at one time.

The Wickham’s General Manager David McKillop

says that since its opening in 2014, Garden Bar has

become hugely popular.

“The venue’s incredible repositioning, renovation

and re-launch as well as quality service and offering

have created an environment appealing to all

demographics,” he says. “The versatility of Garden

Bar is evident constantly with the outdoor hub used as

QHA REVIEW | 31


INSIGHTS

QHA REVIEW | 32

a live music space, function area and corporate

lunch venue.”

During the week a strong lunch trade transforms into

a popular trivia crowd on Thursdays while Friday and

Saturday evenings see Garden Bar filled with live

music and quality seeking revellers. Sundays start

early with food, daylight DJs and jugs of

shared cocktails.

But don’t let Garden Bar’s street style fool you into

thinking its offering might be makeshift. As David

explains, an attention to good quality is a big part of

the idea.

“When building the container kitchen, we didn’t aim to

be the biggest, just the best. Our food is sourced by

our head chef for its quality and conscious and ethical

practices of the supplier. We also grow as many herbs

as we can in our own garden.

“Our beverage quality matches our food offering in

both taste and value, with shared cocktail jugs, classic

and simple cocktails as well as selective wine and

spirit list which changes to reflect the season.”

David and his team are only too well aware that

operating an outdoor environment in an inner-city

setting requires a more extensive cleaning and

servicing strategy to combat the elements and deliver

a beautiful environment all year round.

“A great deal of attention to detail and operational

process was implemented to ensure our cleaning staff

delivers the highest quality standards at all times,”

he says.

“Similarly, the staff have been trained in consistently

maintaining this level of presentation and cleanliness at

all times.”

They’re mindful of comfort too. To combat the

seasonal elements, The Wickham has employed

environmentally clean, as well as safe techniques such

as state of the art gas heating for the colder months

and the high powered silent fans for the

warmer months.

The design of Garden Bar has also allowed for a cool

breeze to flow through in summer, and awnings and

walls designed to keep heat from escaping

during winter.

Then there’s that other environmental factor that all

operators of outdoor venues must monitor

constantly – noise.

“To protect our neighbours from excessive noise, we

have installed state of the art directional speakers, as

well as performing regular DB checks to monitor noise

pollution,” he says.

“CLEVER OUTDOOR DESIGN ALSO SHIELDS

BOTH NEIGHBOURS AND PATRONS FROM NOISE

DISTORTION WITH OUR INSULATING WALLS,

WHICH ARE FURTHER COVERED BY

GARDEN AND GREENERY.”

“Clever outdoor design also shields both neighbours

and patrons from noise distortion with our insulating

walls, which are further covered by garden

and greenery.”

The Wickham’s Garden Bar owes its continued

popularity to the way it adapts to the myriad whims of

a diversity of urban dwellers on a daily, and

nightly, basis.

AT A GLANCE

• Established in 1885 and designed by the famous

Brisbane architect Richard Gailey, The Wickham

began life as the Oriental Hotel.

• As a contemporary inner-city pub, The Wickham is

reflective of the community in which it’s found – a

place where people of all identities can meet, drink,

party, and eat.

• The Wickham’s food is all about freshness and

flavour. All ingredients are grown fresh from the

Garden Bar and hand-picked daily by the chef.


INSIGHTS

QHA REVIEW | 33


INSIGHTS

CLASSIC HOTEL

LEGACY PRESERVED

country pubs. John and Michelle’s commitment to

the cause has restored Goondiwindi’s historic nod to

Victorian architecture and the Jazz Age into a bright,

contemporary hospitality venue.

QHA REVIEW | 34

ELEVEN YEARS AGO GOONDIWINDI’S ICONIC

120-YEAR-OLD VICTORIA HOTEL WAS A LITTLE

WORSE FOR WEAR AND DUE FOR DEMOLITION.

THEN ALONG CAME LOCAL HOTELIERS JOHN AND

MICHELLE KLEIN.

Their bold move to take on the ramshackle old girl in

2006 and redeliver her status as the “jewel of Marshall

Street” wowed locals and earned the “Vic” two QHA

Awards for Excellence last year for Best Traditional

Hotel Bar and Best Budget Accommodation.

Some might say hotels in these categories are a

dying breed. But that would do a disservice to an

increasing number of dedicated hoteliers across the

country who are courageously investing time and

resources into preserving Australia’s legacy of classic

Renovated pub loses none of its

traditional charm

With a distinctly off-kilter corner turret dominating the

building’s profile, latticed veranda arches and starkly

defined white-with-charcoal-trim colour scheme,

the Victoria Hotel is an unmissable landmark on

Goondiwindi’s main street.

Michelle Klein’s talents as a qualified interior designer

are evident within. A simple yet enticing palette

comprising off-whites, rusty reds, earth-grays

and relaxed blues unite old and new - from the

contemporary bar fittings to the century-old vertical

tongue-and-groove cladding throughout.

“She had a huge task in making the hotel look brand

new but keep its heritage feel,” John says. “Our recent

renovations transformed the dated bar areas into

sophisticated examples of a high-functioning multiservice

venue.”


INSIGHTS

THE B&B IS A LIGHT-HEARTED LOOK AT HOW

A DILAPIDATED BUILDING ON THE CUSP OF

DEMOLITION HAS BEEN BEAUTIFULLY RESTORED TO

ITS ‘GLORY DAYS...

Classic pub accommodation

Situated throughout the Vic’s upper level, a

reinvigorated accommodation area comprising 14

rooms, a common room, a cosy winter fireplace and

shared amenities entice visitors to lengthen their stay.

John and Michelle have taken care to retain the rooms’

classical Queenslander hotel character, refurbishing

them in a traditional style and preserving vintage trims

and fittings. Many of the rooms open out onto wide

verandas which embrace views of the town. Most

sleep one or two people, with the largest room able to

accommodate two adults and two children with their

own en suite.

“Breakfast can be arranged for large group stays,”

John says. “But in general no breakfast is served on a

daily basis.”

John, Michelle and the staff are only too pleased to

show off all facets of the hotel, with over 2000 guests

having taken the opportunity to explore the bones of

this historic beauty by joining the Vic’s regular B&B*

(“Beer and Bullsh*t”) tour.

“The B&B is a light-hearted look at how a dilapidated

building on the cusp of demolition has been beautifully

restored to its ‘glory days’ with all the convenience of

modern facilities,” explains John. “It’s a light shandy

of comedy that concludes with lunch and a drink on

the veranda.”

AT A GLANCE

• Michael Bell, the local builder who the Kleins

contracted to undertake the Victoria Hotel’s

renovations is part of a proud lineage of

Goondiwindi builders. Michael’s great-grandfather

William Bell built the original hotel.

• A former owner of the Vic, George Pippos,

was part of the 1960s syndicate that owned

the champion Aussie thoroughbred Gunsynd.

The lucrative stallion was defeated only once in

seven starts over a mile and several post-race

celebrations at the Vic are the stuff of legend.

• The Vic’s history includes other colourful yarns.

There are stories of horsemen riding into the bar

and lassoing bottles from the shelves in the old

days. It is also certainly true that a customer took

his boat into the bar during the 1956 floods.

QHA REVIEW | 35


INDUSTRY ENGAGEMENT with Damian Steele

THE STATE OF THE REGIONS

QHA REVIEW | 36

Each year the Australian Local Government

Association (ALGA), in partnership with National

Economics, publishes the State of the Regions

report which identifies each region’s economic

development issues and assesses the effectiveness

of policies for removing roadblocks to regional

economic development.

This year’s 2017-18 report revisits the critical

question of boosting regional economic productivity.

The documnet provides a detailed analysis on how

these regions are performing and then analyses the

likely consequences of current issues. It then further

provides an annual stock-take of the economic wellbeing

of Australia’s regions and their prospects for

economic development and employment growth.

According to the ALGA, the report tells a concerning

story on the inequity across some of the economies

in Australia’s regions, namely a widening gap in

employment rates, household incomes

and productivity.

The core objectives of the report are to:

• Present the latest statistical indicators of how

Australian regions are performing.

• Analyse the indicator trends in terms of growing

equality and inequality between Australian regions.

• Make suggestions for the policy implications of

current Australian regional performance.

• Steadily expand the indicators used to measure

regional performance.

• Describe the reality of regional economics.

Regular features included in the report are updates

on the structure of regional incomes, skills and

employment, housing and wealth, telecommunications,

energy and climate change. It provides extensive data

for 67 regions covering all of Queensland

and Australia.

The document argues that reducing the inequality

of income distribution within and between Australian

regions will be pivotal to strengthening Australia’s

economy and bridging the employment fallout from

the subsiding mining boom in low income regions.

Further evidence is provided that Australia has under

invested in infrastructure, particularly of a transport

nature. It concludes that countering regional inequality

needs to go beyond the traditional emphasis on

direct tax / transfer redistribution, and focus more on

geographically appropriate and targeted investments

including infrastructure provision, training and job

creation activities.

The QHA appreciates the challenges of our regional

members and has supported the Liquor (Rural Hotels

Concession) Amendment Bill 2017, introduced by

Robbie Katter MP, which proposes to reduce the

annual liquor licence commercial hotel base fee

by 90%.

All members are encouraged to attend the QHA

Regional Licensees’ Meetings which provide an

invaluable opportunity to voice your issues for

QHA representation.

Please see the QHA Events calendar for meeting dates

or contact QHA Membership Services Officer, Paul St

John-Wood or yours truly for details.

Information about the State of the Regions report can

be found at: http://alga.asn.au


NEW FINANCIAL

YEAR, SAME OLD

HR ISSUES?

MAKE PURCHASING THE QHA

HR MANUAL ONE OF YOUR NEW

FINANCIAL YEAR RESOLUTIONS!

Don’t just get your hotel’s financial affairs in order post-1 July – purchase the QHA HR

Manual to help you manage staffing matters, and make your life easier!

Designed with busy hoteliers in mind, the QHA HR Manual helps you organise every

challenge of managing a team of staff. The manual includes comprehensive human

resources policies and helpful templates for everything from job descriptions,

appointment letters, discipline and termination letters, policy and procedure

templates, timesheets, employer and employee forms and much, much more.

The recently revised edition

is available through the online

QHA Shop at www.qha.org.au.

$365 for members.

$765 for non-members.

“WE PURCHASE EVERY EDITION AS THE AUTOMATIC

UPDATES DURING AN EDITION LIFE ARE INVALUABLE.

WE WOULD NOT BE WITHOUT IT!”

Michael and Shelley Porter from Porters Plainland Hotel

QHA REVIEW | 37


FINANCE with Jeremy Wicht

NEW ROYAL HOTEL RUBYVALE

winner of the Best Bush Pub in the

2016 QHA Awards for Excellence

MAINTAINING YOUR HOTEL ASSET

QHA REVIEW | 38

I recently had a regional publican tell me a story of

how his business was facing increased competition

from smaller licensed bars setting up in his town.

The story was familiar: the newest bar will attract an

initial following pinching some of his night crowd; then

after a few months “honeymoon” the bar will start to

discount its drinks, then its food and, when the next

new bar opens and moves the patrons, it closes.

Running a hotel, and particularly a regional venue

where local economic conditions have reduced

customer spend, is difficult. Competition is fierce

and staying one step ahead of your competition is

hard. However, despite this, there are always some

operators that seem to consistently maintain their

trade and there are a few common threads about how

they do it. Here’s my top five tips for maintaining your

trade (and hotel value) in tough times:-

1. Don’t let the offering get stale: View the hotel

like a stage show. If the offering is the same weekin

and week-out, then your customers will get

bored. The top operators always have some new

event or promotion that they are working on : from

a new seasonal menu, a new music entertainment

series, to gaming promotions and special events

such as wine dinners, BBQ competitions and

calendar events (such as Halloween, American

Independence Day, Melbourne Cup etc.)

2. Reward loyalty: Most modern gaming venues

have sophisticated loyalty programmes for their

gaming patrons, but why not look at developing

programmes for other parts of the hotel such as

the bars, bistro and retail areas. If is often the little

things that make a big difference to our customers:

like recognising the birthdays of your regulars in the

front bar with a birthday cake and round of drinks,

or free nibblies on Friday night for groups of 6 or

more coming in for knock-off drinks, or loyalty wine

packages for regular retail customers.

3. Keep up with regular maintenance: In tough

times it becomes even more important to keep

your venue looking ship-shape. Particularly, don’t

neglect the areas of the hotel that are noticed by

customers such as gardens, driveways, painting,

furniture and signage. At a minimum you should

be budgeting to at least reinvest your annual

depreciation charge back into the hotel.

4. Target your marketing: The media landscape is

changing and so are the ways that our customers


Jeremy Wicht

FINANCE

are choosing to get their news. Traditional channels

such as TV and newspaper advertising are giving

way to social media that offers more direct and

cost effective targeting of customer groups. To be

effective on social media you need to post offers

and information that engages with the customer:

• Use professional videos and high quality

photographs where you can—

• Create an “offer” that requires a response (i.e.

printing off a voucher, tag a friend, or respond with

their name).

• Time your post to appear at peak times for your

target audience – usually around travel time

to/from work.

• Boost your post within your local trade area.

• Co-ordinate the offer with corresponding

in-house advertising.

• Resist the temptation to do it yourself. Proper

presentation and marketing is very different from

iPhone photos and Wordpress websites. Social

media has an unquenchable appetite for content.

Keep it real and keep it fresh.

5. Benchmark your venue against other topperforming

venues: To stay on top of the game,

keep a keen eye on what other top venues are

doing. Keep in touch with other venue operators at

industry events and measure yourself against the top

THERE ARE ALWAYS SOME OPERATORS THAT SEEM

TO CONSISTENTLY MAINTAIN THEIR TRADE AND

THERE ARE A FEW COMMON THREADS ABOUT HOW

THEY DO IT

operators. There is always something new that you

can learn or adopt for your venue to stay

on trend.

Remember your hotel is an asset. An asset that has

to earn a rate of return commensurate with the risks

that you are undertaking. It should not be considered

a cash box, nor a social outlet (although we sincerely

hope it’s both). It’s your single biggest asset. Make it

work hard!

QHA REVIEW | 39


PUB TALK

QHA Board visits the Kuttabul Hotel

Bus tour briefing by Bernie Hogan

Pinnacle Hotel

Sweeping views: Eungella Chalet

QHA Regional Board Meeting, Shamrock Hotel, Mackay

ON THE ROAD AGAIN

THANK YOU TO THE HOTELIERS IN AND AROUND MACKAY WHO ATTENDED THE QHA REGIONAL BOARD MEETING

AT THE START OF AUGUST. SPECIAL THANKS MUST ALSO GO TO PETER AND JEN AT THE SHAMROCK HOTEL WHO

HOSTED THE MEETING AND TO PFD FOOD SERVICES FOR PROVIDING THE LUNCH FOR THE 70 ATTENDEES TO ENJOY.

KANDANGA HOTEL

QHA REVIEW | 40

The day after devastation: Fire destroyed the

Kandanga Hotel in 2015.

On Saturday 12th December 2015 we woke to the

devastating news that the 101 year old Kandanga

Hotel had burnt to the ground. Thankfully no one was

hurt in the blaze and owners Carol and Doug Greensill

were back trading out of a makeshift pub on the

site the very next day to service the community. The

makeshift pub continued trading through until Saturday

22nd July this year when the Greensills, along with

hundreds from the community, celebrated the opening

of the rebuilt hotel. Congratulations to Carol and Doug

for their tireless work throughout the rebuild. We will

have a feature on the new hotel in the September

QHA Review.


with Paul St John-Wood

Heading North to Bowen

Sandy McDonald

View from the Clarion Hotel, Mackay

Visiting the Grandview Hotel, Bowen

The rebuilt Kandanga Hotel

Pinnacle Hotel

IGT & QHA GOLF DAY –

ROYAL PINES RESORT

The annual IGT & QHA Golf Day will

be held this year at the home of the

Australian PGA Championship, Royal

Pines Resort. We encourage all

hoteliers who enjoy a round of golf,

or simply a networking day out of the

pub, to come along. To book your

team or as an individual to be placed

in a team please contact the

QHA office.

QHA GYMPIE LICENSEE MEETING

The next regional licensees meeting

will be held in Gympie on Tuesday

29 August. Licensees in this

area will have received details of

the meeting via post and email.

Along with accessing information

directly from the QHA and industry

representatives, the licensees

meetings offer the opportunity to

network with counterparts from your

region in a more social environment

compared to standard accord

meetings. This format also allows

licensees to raise any localised issues

or challenges which the QHA may be

able to advocate at a regional or state

level to assist.

WELCOME TO NEW MEMBERS

The QHA would like to welcome new

members The Keppel Sands Hotel

– Keppel Sands, The Grand Hotel

– Biggenden and The Andergrove

(The Grove) Tavern - Andergrove.

We wish you every success in your

hotel business endeavours for the

remainder of 2017 and beyond.

QHA REVIEW | 41


COMPASS

TAKING TO THE OUTBACK AIR

SMACK IN THE BULLSEYE OF QUEENSLAND, LONGREACH IS A FOCAL POINT FOR AVIATION ENTHUSIASTS AND

INTREPID TRAVELLERS LOOKING FOR A HISTORICAL TASTE OF THE OUTBACK.

QHA REVIEW | 42

Nothing defines the heartland of the outback better

than a town at the heart of it all. Early pioneering

pastoral development of the area was hampered by

the absence of a secure water supply and only able

to support a loose partnering of leaseholds known as

“Forrest Grove”.

The town of Longreach owes its existence to

government surveyors discovering that a large

waterhole on a “long reach” of the Thomson River

was sufficient to support the establishment of a larger

settlement in the 1880s.

This cleared the way for extending the Rockhampton

to Barcaldine railway to the Thomson River and

the fledgling town’s appeal grew. Westward

looking entrepreneurs soon arrived along with

more pastoralists and by 1890 there were three

hotels, several stores and tradespeople, a progress

association and a police station. The town then grew

steadily from a population of 150 in 1891 to around

2000 in 1903.

Although land-based commercial activity would always

be the town’s mainstay, activity in the air would give

Longreach lasting fame. In 1919 two WW1 veteran

airmen visited Longreach while planning the Darwin to

Longreach section of a proposed long-haul air route

between Australia and England. Paul McGinness and

Hudson Fysh would later establish Qantas airlines

in Winton (177km up the road to the north-west)

supported by a large plane assembly factory at

Longreach aerodrome.

Today the aerodrome is home to the Qantas Founders

Museum. Aviation enthusiasts the world over visit

to take the Boeing 747 “walking wing” tour or test

their flying skills with the world’s only Bristol Fighter

simulator among displays focusing on the founding

THE TOWN OF LONGREACH OWES ITS EXISTENCE TO

GOVERNMENT SURVEYORS DISCOVERING THAT A

LARGE WATERHOLE ON A “LONG REACH” OF THE

THOMSON RIVER

figures of Qantas and the impact of aviation

in Australia.

Another hit with tourists is the Stockman’s Hall of

Fame. This museum was officially opened by the

Queen in 1988 in conjunction with bicentennial

celebrations and showcases the stories of explorers,

stock workers and pastoralists from all walks of

life that shaped the outback’s history. The building’s

striking design was inspired by the countless

silos and water tanks dotted throughout the

surrounding countryside.

The Longreach Powerhouse Museum also attracts

a lot of visitors and is the largest preserved rural

generating facility in Australia.

Three QHA member hotels are located in the middle of

town and one in nearby Ilfracombe.


Photo credit: Beau Giles

QHA REVIEW | 43


COMPASS

QHA REVIEW | 44

BIRDCAGE HOTEL

The Birdcage Hotel is a bustling food and

entertainment venue located on the corner of Duck

and Galah Streets (exemplifying a curious fact about

Longreach: streets running roughly east-west are

named after water birds, those running roughly northsouth

after land birds). With a modern bar, steakhouse

and gaming room, this locally owned and managed

venue is proud of its family-friendly reputation with

great meal options, live music and “Baby Galah” kids’

room. Big kids can enjoy a pool table and dance floor.

Gaming machines, Keno and a corporate room for

functions are also available.

LONGREACH TAVERN

Just round the corner on the Eagle St main drag is

the Longreach Tavern. Owners Tim and Kim Trad offer

some of the coldest beer in town, hearty meals (their

menu boasts a delicious veal parmigiana and even a

fish burger), pool table, darts, Keno, pokies and the

local TAB. Its Cellarbrations bottle-shop was

revamped earlier this year and offers specials on

a variety of tipples.

LYCEUM HOTEL

Further down Eagle St, and with a distinctive green

laminex bar top in its main bar, the Lyceum Hotel offers

two bars and 18 rooms of accommodation. The venue

opens until late and attracts a younger set of patrons.

WELLSHOT HOTEL

Twenty kilometres out of town, but still within a lasso’s

swing of Longreach, is the town of Ilfracombe – home

to one of the outback’s most iconic bush pubs.

The historic Wellshot Hotel dates back to 1890 and

is steeped in outback character, having found its

permanent home in Ilfracombe after being relocated

several times by bullock and cart along the railway

line. Paul and Tracy Hatch recently took ownership

of the pub late last year and describe it as a dream

come true. “We visited, we stayed at the pub,” Tracy

explains. “I remember saying ‘I love this place, how

awesome is this pub’ anything at all to convince Paul

that it was a good idea.” Paul and Tracy offer a wide

range of beers, wines, scotch, whiskey, rum, nonalcoholic

beverages and country style meals every

day – as well as seven rooms of revamped shearers’

quarters that now provide quality accommodation.


ND00412AC

QHA REVIEW | 45


ACCOMMODATION

BRISBANE’S TRYP HOTEL RECOGNISED WITH

STATE ART AND ARCHITECTURE AWARD

QHA REVIEW | 46

Brisbane’s only street art hotel was recognised for its

unique and contemporary design at the recent 2017

Queensland State Architecture Awards.

Shane Denman Architects received the Australian

Institute of Architects Art and Architecture Prize

(Qld) for TRYP Fortitude Valley Hotel, Brisbane at the

awards event.

Featuring striking original murals and artworks by

acclaimed artists Beastman, Rone, Numskull, Fintan

Magee and Seven, the 65-room boutique hotel on

Constance Street opened in 2014 and has become an

urban design landmark in the cultural hub of

Fortitude Valley.

The judging panel praised TRYP Fortitude Valley’s

salvaged original artworks and newly commissioned

pieces which permeate the entire hotel, including the

lift shafts, stairways, wallpaper, basins and

courtyard walls.

Barry Robinson, President and Managing Director of

Wyndham Hotel Group South East Asia and Pacific

Rim, said the group’s TRYP Fortitude Valley property

had become a destination in its own right thanks to its

unique identity as a street art hotel.

“Since it opened, TRYP Fortitude Valley has

commanded attention and I am so proud to see it

continue to receive these types of accolades,” Barry

said. “It is a truly unique property that has set a

benchmark for others of its type.”


Judy Hill

ACCOMMODATION UPDATE

WHAT CHINESE GUESTS WANT

FROM ACCOMMODATION HOTELS

The sixth annual Chinese International Travel Monitor

(CITM) released by Hotels.com has revealed that

Chinese travellers are spending a whopping 28% of

their income on average on international travel. They

also intend to spend 10% more on travel in the next

12 months, with Australia topping the list as the most

desired destination in Asia-Pacific.

Regardless of many key indicators showing signs of a

slowdown in the Chinese economy, this year’s CITM

found spending on travel increased across all age

brackets, with Chinese travellers spending US$3,600

in the last 12 months – more than a quarter of their

income and an increase of 4% compared with the

previous year.

Nineties millennials are the biggest spenders,

allocating 35% of their income to travel. 93% of

Australian hoteliers surveyed in the Hotels.com

research said they accommodated Chinese travellers,

with 55% observing growth of the market over the last

12 months.

According to the Hotels.com data, Australia was

deemed the third most welcoming country to Chinese

travellers, up one place from 2016. Despite this, the

Hotels.com report revealed a gap in what Chinese

guests want versus what hotels are providing,

highlighting that, by making some adaptions to

accommodate Chinese tourists, there is huge potential

for Australian hotels to further tap into this market.

While Australian hotels are focusing their efforts on

social media and marketing programs in a bid to

attract Chinese travellers, the investment in on-site

services for Chinese guests has decreased according

to the Hotels.com data.

The report identified key areas where hotels could

improve their services, according to Chinese travellers:

Chinese payment facilities at hotels, such as UnionPay,

rank second for consumers in importance, yet only

18% of Australian hotels currently offer these facilities

and only 15% intend to offer them in the next

12 months.

In-house Mandarin speaking staff was ranked number

one by travellers but was low on the list for hoteliers,

with only 16% currently offering the service and 11%

planning to do so in the next 12 months. On-site

Chinese restaurants were ranked fifth by travellers

however only 3% of hoteliers currently offer this service

and only 5% intend to provide it in the next 12 months.

Translated travel guides were ranked number four by

travellers but are a low in priority for hoteliers; 14%

currently offer this and only 17% plan to in future.

Both the perception of Australia as a welcoming

destination, and the willingness of accommodation

providers to cater to Chinese travellers is critical to

ensuring sustainability of the local tourism industry.

As Australia’s second largest inbound tourist market

Chinese travellers offer huge economic benefits to our

country and to our state of Queensland.

It’s pleasing to see Australia continues to deliver quality

and friendly hospitality but this reputation needs to be

maintained to ensure Chinese travellers feel welcome

not only to visit our country but also to stay in our

accommodation hotels. Despite this reputation,

Australia has fallen two places since topping the wish

list of countries to visit last year.

The CITM report notes that Chinese travellers have

entered a new phase in their evolution and are

demanding more of everything – more time travelling,

more locations and more diverse experiences and

it’s vital that as accommodation providers you adapt

to these evolving needs and develop tailored hotel

services that tap into their enormous spending power.

QHA REVIEW | 47


FOCUS

CHANGING ENVIRONMENTS

FOR MARSHA FRANKLIN THERE’S NEVER A DULL MOMENT AS GENERAL MANAGER OF THE HOTEL GRAND

CHANCELLOR PALM COVE IN TROPICAL NORTH QUEENSLAND. QHA REVIEW TALKS TO HER ABOUT ECOTOURISM

AND RESPONDING TO ONLINE CUSTOMER FEEDBACK.

QHA REVIEW | 48

What brought you into the hotel and

hospitality industry?

I started working in hospitality over 20 years ago.

I was working in London in a hotel as Bar Supervisor

and someone called in sick on reception with no one

able to cover the shift. I did some quick training and

worked the next day on the front desk and absolutely

fell in love. I knew then and there Rooms was where I

wanted to be!

What brought you to the Hotel Grand Chancellor

Palm Cove?

I worked for the Hotel Grand Chancellor in Adelaide

about eight years ago in both of their properties

Hotel Grand Chancellor on Currie and Hotel Grand

Chancellor on Hindley. I then assisted my now boss

Peter Yared when they purchased the Hotel Grand

Chancellor Surfers Paradise. So when I got a phone

call from Pete again advising there was a Hotel

Manager role in gorgeous Palm Cove, I jumped at the

opportunity. I’ve been here for a year now and still love

every day of it. I started working in hotels a long time

ago and have worked in London, New Zealand and

throughout Australia. Adelaide is home for me and

my first GM role was for an Adelaide Based Company

1834 Hotels at their venue in

Clare Valley.

What’s the best thing about managing a hotel in

such a spectacular setting?

The best thing is absolutely the setting. Every day I

step outside of my office and look at the landscape

and just take it all in. There is so much to do in Far

North QLD. No day is ever boring.

Do you think demand for ecotourism will

continue to grow in Tropical North Queensland?

Absolutely! Tropical North Queensland is rapidly

developing and continues to grow every month. We

live in such a beautiful place that we can’t take it for

granted. It brings us so many international travellers

every year. With such a beautiful environment and

so many spectacular places to go and see in North

Queensland we must protect our precious destination.


FOCUS

How important is inviting and responding

to online guest feedback to the operation of

a hotel?

Feedback and reviews are imperative. They can drive

your position on third party websites and this directly

impacts sales. Guests want to see that you take their

feedback seriously and have a genuine care for their

comments. I respond to all reviews and feedback

as quickly as possible. Most travellers research their

destination using Tripadvisor, so being present and

addressing all feedback given shows that you take

guest comments seriously and want to engage

with travellers.

What effect has the end of the independent Star

Rating scheme had on the industry?

Star Ratings are a thing of the past. I personally didn’t

agree with some of the grading for Star Rating as it

didn’t really give you an honest review of the hotel and

its facilities. However in 2017, with social media and

online sites such as Tripadvisor so popular, it’s the best

tool for travellers to research the hotels where they’re

thinking of staying. Star Rating 20 years ago assisted

travellers in picking the best hotels, however these

days everything and anything they want to know about

hotels can be found online.

What advice would you give to someone just

starting out as a Hotel Manager?

You need to have a thick skin these days and passion.

Without both of these, it’s a tough industry. There’s

no down time in hotels. It’s 365 days a year, 24 hours

a day. With reviews and social media everything is

transparent for the world to see, so being the best you

can be all of the time is paramount.

Marsha Franklin

QHA REVIEW | 49


SUPERANNUATION with Brendan O’Farrell

THE GOOD THAT CAME FROM

THE CHANGES TO SUPER

There was some good news that came from the many

changes made to super on 1 July 2017.

Spouse contributions

More partners will be able to claim a tax offset for

contributing to their spouses’ super balance. Tax

offsets were previously only available when the

receiving spouse earned less than $13,800. This

income threshold has now been increased to $40,000,

making the tax offset available to more people. It’s an

initiative that could help reduce the super gender gap

in situations where partners have taken time off work

to care for children or family members.

Low Income Superannuation Tax Offset

A tax offset is available to low-income earners

who make after-tax contributions to their super

accounts. This tax offset was previously known

as the low-income super contribution (LISC) and

was set to be scrapped on 1 July 2017. The offset

has been reinstated and renamed the low-income

superannuation tax offset (LISTO). Workers earning

$37,000 or less can once again receive a tax offset

of up to $500 to their super account each year.

Essentially, it means low-income earners may not have

to pay any tax on their super contributions.

Tax deductible contributions

A tax deduction has been made available to all

employees who make super contributions. Previously,

this advantage was only available to self-employed

workers or those able to salary sacrifice. Now, all

employees can receive a tax deduction of up to 15 per

cent on their super contributions. For many workers,

setting up salary sacrifice may seem complicated. This

new flexibility is a great way to make tax-advantaged

super contributions easy for employees.

First Home Super Saver Scheme

An additional change to super was proposed in the

May 2017 Federal Budget. The proposal is called

the First Home Super Saver Scheme (FHSSS). If it is

passed in Parliament, first-home buyers will be able

to save for a deposit through voluntary contributions

to their superannuation account. If the scheme

proves popular, it could mean younger members

will be motivated to start engaging with super. The

scheme could be a great way for younger members to

understand the value of saving for their futures.

Unfortunately, the FHSSS may cause some headaches

for your payroll departments. The ATO will be

managing FHSSS balances, and will need to know

the difference between member contributions and

employer contributions. This could mean your payroll

department will need to separate salary sacrifice

and superannuation guarantee contributions when

they process superannuation payments (if they don’t

already do so). The scheme has not yet been passed

through Parliament, however, so the details of its

management haven’t been finalised. If it does become

effective, Intrust Super’s Client Service Managers will

be happy to help should your payroll department need

any assistance.

If you are interested in learning more about the

superannuation changes, or about the First Home

Super Saver Scheme, just give us a call on 132 467.

The information contained in this document is of a general nature only,

and does not take into account your individual situation, objectives

and needs. You should consider the appropriateness of the general

information having regard to your own situation before making any

investment decision. A Product Disclosure Statement is available at

www.intrust.com.au or call us on 132 467 for a copy.

Issued by IS Industry Fund Pty Ltd | MySuper Unique Identifier:

65704511371601 | ABN: 45 010 814 623 | AFSL No: 238051 | RSE

Licence No: L0001298 | Intrust Super ABN 65 704 511 371 | SPIN/

USI: HPP0100AU | RSE Registration No: R1004397

QHA REVIEW | 50


Sarah Tilby

EMPLOYMENT RELATIONS

UNFAIR DISMISSAL CLAIMS STRIKE WITHOUT WARNING

Most of those with the responsibility of managing

underperforming or misbehaving staff will know

that in many cases a warning should be provided

to an employee before considering termination of

employment. However, do you know:

• why issuing warnings is so important in the context

of an unfair dismissal claim?

• how many warnings should be given?

• what are some of the primary elements that should

be included in a warning?

These questions are often put to the QHA Employment

Relations Department.

Why are warnings so important when an

employer is considering termination of

employment?

The Fair Work Act 2009 (Cth) contains unfair dismissal

provisions which the Fair Work Commission (FWC) will

use in assessing whether a dismissal is fair or unfair.

Warnings relevantly feature in the unfair dismissal

provisions, and will be something that the FWC will

look to have occurred. This expectation applies to both

small and medium/large businesses.

A failure to provide any warning for underperformance

in an unfair dismissal application can lead to the

FWC deciding that a dismissal was harsh, unjust

or unreasonable under section 387 of the Act, and

therefore unfair – even if the employer had a valid

reason for termination.

Is there a requirement to give a set number of

warnings under the Act?

There is a misconception often held by employers that

it is a legislative requirement to provide an employee

with three warnings before dismissing them. Under the

Act, there is no specific minimum number of warnings

that an employer must issue to an employee before

dismissing them.

However, this does not give an employer free reign to

dismiss an employee with no warning. Each situation

needs to be assessed on a case by case basis as

to what number of warnings should be given before

progressing to a termination of employment. The

FWC will certainly be looking at whether one or more

warnings were issued in most cases.

In very specific circumstances where an employer

considers that an employee’s conduct constitutes

“serious misconduct”, an employer may have reason

to progress straight to termination without first

issuing a warning. For small business employers, the

Small Business Fair Dismissal Code refers to serious

misconduct as including theft, fraud, violence and

serious breaches of occupational health and safety

procedures. Serious misconduct is also separately

defined further in the Fair Work Regulations 2009 (Cth).

Employers should seek advice before termination

without warning on the basis of serious misconduct, as

this should not be done without careful consideration

as to the employee’s specific circumstances. Members

can contact the QHA ER Department to discuss

situations involving alleged serious misconduct.

What should be included in a warning?

One of the common areas of concern that QHA’s

Employment Relations Department has identified when

speaking to members about employee warnings is the

content of such warnings.

A warning should usually include (but not be limited to):

• detailed information as to the performance, conduct

or capacity concerns held by the employer.

• information explaining that the employee was

provided with an opportunity to give a satisfactory

explanation / excuse for the concerns in a meeting

(with meeting details included), but that none was

given.

• information on how the employee is expected to

act / perform in future.

• a review period in which the employer will monitor

the employee’s performance / conduct.

• a clear explanation that a failure to improve in the

areas of concern will result in further disciplinary

action, which may include termination

Employers who require template warning letters

(which include wording referring to the above elements

and more) can purchase the QHA discipline and

termination template pack or the QHA HR Manual.

Further Information

Contact the QHA Employment Relations Department

on 07 3221 6999 or at er@qha.org.au and order these

products online at www.qha.org.au.

QHA REVIEW | 51


TRAINING AND SAFETY

with Ross Tims

NO COST INTERNSHIPS

FOR YOUR VENUE

QHA REVIEW | 52

As many would know, the QHA has been contracted

for the next three years by the Federal Government

to deliver hospitality training courses, which we call

#HospitalityFirstStep, to young unemployed job

seekers aged between 17-24 years.

This Youth Jobs PaTH (Prepare-Trial-Hire) employability

skills program equips young people for work in the

hotel and wider hospitality industry. It will provide our

sector with more trained labour, give something back

to the community in terms of our social “licence”

and deliver an additional income stream to your

Association. At this stage, the program is only being

delivered in SE Queensland.

TRIAL AN INTERN

If you’re looking for staff, you can work with an

Australian Government employment services provider

anywhere in Queensland to design an internship

placement of between four and 12 weeks, at no cost

to you. The provider will support you and the intern

through the duration of the internship. If you’re in

SE Queensland, the QHA may be able to broker an

internship with job seekers (and their employment

services provider) who have graduated from

#HospitalityFirstStep.

The internship is an opportunity to see how a young

person fits into your team and if they’re suitable for

employment in your hotel. Instead of receiving a wage

from employers, the Government provides interns with

an additional $200 a fortnight on top of their income

support payment.

Employers receive a payment of $1000 to help cover

the costs of hosting an intern and they are insured for

the length of their internship. The internship needs to

be structured and supervised, providing the intern with

30-50 hours of work experience per fortnight. Your

participants must be aged 17-24 and have received

employment services for six months or more.

HIRE AN INTERN / WAGE SUBSIDIES

The Government provides a financial incentive of

up to $10,000 (GST incl.), paid over six months,

to employers who hire eligible young job seekers.

Employers can negotiate how often payments are

made, for example weekly or fortnightly. There is also

a kickstart payment option of up to 40 per cent of

the total amount after four weeks of the job starting.

The job can be full-time, part-time or casual but must

be an ongoing position and provide an average of

at least 20 hours per week over the six-month wage

subsidy agreement. These subsidies are also available

to employers who hire eligible job seekers without

providing an internship.

Employers who hire an eligible young person through

an apprenticeship or traineeship may also be able

to access wage subsidies along with other financial

incentives available to employers under the Australian

Apprenticeships Incentives Program.

For more information go to www.employment.gov.au/

wage-subsidies or contact me on ph 07 3221 699,

mob 0411 166 810 or email rtims@qha.org.au


John Rozentals

WINE

TERRIOR ALERT

YOU’D HAVE TO BE A FAIRLY CONTRARY

SOUL TO ARGUE THESE DAYS AGAINST

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE ROLE PLAYED

BY CLIMATE AND ASPECT ON THE

QUALITY OF WINE.

McWilliams Winemaker Jim

Chatto … has delivered

medium-bodied wines

which have been made

to accompany food.

It’s something covered generally by the French term

“terroir”, which also includes things such as soil and

vine layout.

A major part of terroir is a vineyard’s altitude,

something that’s closely related to climate and hence

to how a wine tastes.

It’s why the best of Queensland’s wines generally come

from the Granite Belt, high up in the Great Dividing

Range, to the south-west of Brisbane, where vineyard

altitudes generally run between about 700 and

1000 metres.

But we’re staying south of the border today, where

McWilliams has just launched its new McW 480

and McW 660 Reserve ranges, with labels proudly

displaying the contours of topographic maps and the

numbers referring to elevation above sea level.

The McW 480 range is priced at about $20 and

comprises a Hilltops Shiraz alongside a Sauvignon

Blanc and a Pinot Noir from Tumbarumba.

The McW 660 Reserve range takes it up a bit in price

to about $25 and quite significantly in altitude, to

vineyards averaging some 660 metres above sea level.

Here we get a Chardonnay and a Pinot Noir from

Tumbarumba, a Cabernet Sauvignon and a Shiraz

from Hilltops, and a Syrah from near Canberra. Shiraz

and Syrah are made from the same grape variety, with

the latter generally being more savoury and European

in style, the former being bolder and brasher, in the

style of the big reds Australians have grown quite

accustomed to.

I’ve tasted a few of the Reserve wines and think that

they offer plenty of distinctively cool-climate flavour and

represent excellent value for money.

Winemaker Jim Chatto has delivered medium-bodied

wines which have been made to accompany food —

and do so very nicely, thank you very much.

Visit www.mcwilliams.com.au.

TOP SHELF

with John Rozentals

MCWILLIAMS 2015

McW 660 Reserve

Hilltops Cabernet

Sauvignon

MCWILLIAMS 2016

McW 660 Reserve

Tumbarumba

Chardonnay

TOPPERS

MOUNTAIN 2012

Wild Ferment

Tempranillo

You can taste here

exactly why Cabernet

is a district hero

— an amalgam of

blackberries, cassis and

chocolate, with plenty

of firm tannins.

An elegant cool-climate

dry white that resides

very much in the

nectarine fruit

spectrum, with a layer

of complexing but

unobtrusive oak.

Nearly a maroon

jumper for this one …

a firmly structured New

England dry red with

excellent balance of

fruit, oak and tannin.

A very good wine.

QHA REVIEW | 53


TOP DROP

MASTER DISTILLERS

COLLECTION SMALL

BATCH RUM

Bundaberg Rum

GUNNERY AUSTRALIAN

SPICED RUM

Adelaide Hills Distillery

BORDEAUX

DRY RED 2014

Château Gazeneau

ENTRE DEUX MERS

BIO 2014

Château Baratet

QHA REVIEW | 54

Incredibly smooth and

very easy drinking. It

has a distinctive honey

after finish on the roof of

the mouth. Best straight

up with ice. It’s crafted

by blending the finest

Bundaberg rums with

the richest aged reserves

from the distillery, then

matured in sweet cognac

and brandy barrels.

Bottles are limited with

each MDC Small Batch

release referencing its

batch and bottle number.

The spiced rum rage

powers on and with that

we thought we would try

a white spiced rum and

turned to Adelaide Hills

Distillery having sampled

their magnificent bitter

orange, The Italian,

last edition. It didn’t

disappoint, in fact it was

incredible. Well-balanced

and elegant it celebrates

with style Australian

native ingredients mixed

with traditional rum

spices. Cinnamon myrtle

shines through on the

nose and the palate has a

lingering hazelnut finish.

This wine has a deep

cherry colour and

is well-formed and

remarkably balanced.

It’s simplistic elegance

and full body pairs well

with game meats, roast

lamb or hearty beef

stews along with your

favourite cheeses. 60%

Merlot, 20% Cabernet

Sauvignon, 20%

Cabernet Franc.

This wine has a beautiful

straw yellow colour with

green apple reflections

and a very fresh nose

in which the Sauvignon

dominates. Well balanced

on the palate with notes

of citrus fruit. Perfect with

lobster, prawns, oysters

and fresh seafood or raw

vegetables. The vines are

grown with strict rules to

obtain the ECO-CERT

certification awarded

for all organic farming in

France. 50% Muscadelle,

30% Sémillon, 20%

Sauvignon.


TOP DROP

PILSNER

BALTER

Balter Brewing

SLY FOX

SESSION ALE

Feral Brewing Co.

DRIFTER ENDLESS

SUMMER ALE

Fortitude Brewing Co.

WAYFARER USA

WHEAT BEER

Green Beacon

These guys are receiving

huge accolades, most

notably Champion

Medium Australian

Brewery and Best

New Exhibitor at The

Australian International

Beer Awards, so I had

to try a can of their

Pilsner. I was immediately

transported back to

Germany. Delicate malt

is deftly balanced by the

noble German hop spalt

and the end result is a

beer that’s not outlandish

but plain and simply

exceptional.

Why the hell not? It is

Summer in Queensland

all the year round. It’s

vibrant hoppy, floral and

citrus aroma packs a

punch to complement

our magic weather. It’s

quite a refreshing and

easy drinking brew that’s

low in bitterness. You

can understand why they

called it a “session ale”,

it’s pretty easy to down a

few in quick succession.

Brewed on Mount

Tamborine in the Gold

Coast Hinterland this

session beer is nothing

short of sensational.

Light, refreshing,

moderately balanced

bitterness with a fruit

aroma that is not too

overpowering. As they

say, sometimes less is

more. You don’t always

want a hop bomb. One

could easily drink quite

a few of these. This is a

very enjoyable beer.

“If you like Pina Coladas

and getting caught in

the rain….” Well Rupert

Homes’ 1979 classic

could have almost been

about this brew. Creamy

just like a Pina Colada

with hints of passionfruit,

pineapple, banana

and citrus, this is a far

hoppier experience than

a traditional German

style hefe. Plenty of zesty

freshness to enjoy.

QHA REVIEW | 55


CRAFT BEER SHOWCASE with Matt Kirkegaard

CRAFT BREWERS CONFERENCE ADELAIDE

QHA REVIEW | 56

The Australian craft beer industry – or the independent

brewing industry, as it now wants to be called – held

its annual conference in Adelaide in late July.

The conference was hosted by the Independent

Brewers Association, which was formerly known as

the Craft Beer Industry Association. Founded in 2011,

the association was open to the craft brewing arms of

the large breweries, such as James Squire and Matilda

Bay.

In a divisive move the association voted in May this

year to change its constitution to exclude brewers that

are more than 20 per cent owned by large brewers or

other businesses that hold significant brewery holdings

in Australia or overseas.

With the conference following so soon after

the decision and name change, the issue of

“independence: was a key element in several of the

keynote speeches at the conference.

Dr Ina Verstl, co-author of the book The Beer

Monopoly which charts the globalisation of the

international beer industry, highlighted the importance

of small breweries differentiating themselves.

Dr Verstl said that by developing an “indie” seal and

emblazing it on their products, Australia’s independent

brewers could differentiate their beers from those

produced by “Big Beer” and enable consumers to

readily identify between beers produced by small

brewers and larger corporate produced beers.

Such an approach would reflect what was already

happening in the USA where the US Brewers

Association had developed its own “indie” seal.

“Ownership does matter,” she said. “It does matter

because it is what’s at the core of what is small, local

and also relies on word-of-mouth propaganda.”

To observers such as myself, it has always

been obvious that ownership matters, at least in

philosophical terms.

“It was always a question of time before they

would have to embrace it more fully if they want to

differentiate themselves from the corporate brewers

and their craft beer offerings they need to say what

makes them stick out, because it’s not necessarily the

beers themselves.

“By emphasising ownership, they say, ‘Yes, we are

different”, she said.

She did sound a note of caution for the local industry

though, saying that while craft beer has penetrated

deeply into the US market, she felt that such

penetration may be harder here.

“It would mean you have to overhaul your entire

taxation, distribution and other systems,” she advised.

“[The Australian] distribution opportunities are not

conducive to the growth of craft beer.

“The on-trade market is fairly small. You only have

6000 outlets where you can sell alcohol, that’s only a

bit more than the whole of London has.

“Everybody is clamouring for those taps so the

competition is intense and not all of the publicans are

willing to take on craft because they think it’s a

risky business.”

Dr Verstl said it can be hard for publicans to keep up


Matt Kirkegaard

CRAFT BEER SHOWCASE

Top right: The busy trade floor at the Craft

Brewers Conference Trade Show

Below right:The active trade floor included

bars showcasing independent breweries,

and even working canning lines.

“WE’VE GOT MALT, HOPS, YEAST AND WATER, JUST

FOR STARTERS. WE CAN CELEBRATE THESE THINGS,

AND SO WE SHOULD CELEBRATE THESE THINGS.”

with the fast coming and fast disappearing fads in craft

beer. She also highlighted the problems caused by

the Australian tax regime which penalises the higher

alcohol beers, which many craft styles are

geared towards.

“You would have to charge $15 for a beer,” she said.

“How many Australians will pay that for a beer?

“At the end of the day it is beer we are talking about.”

Her comments contrasted with the keynote presented

by Professor Charlie Bamforth. Sometimes known as

the Pope of Foam, Bamforth is Professor of Malting

and Brewing Sciences at UC Davis in the

United States.

He said that while brewers may choose to differentiate

themselves on independence they should be learning

from their larger counterparts, rather than decrying

them for brewing “yellow fizzy liquid”.

“There are millions of people who like to drink yellow

fizzy liquid and it does not make them bad people,”

he said.

“It may not suit you and it may not suit me… but to

actually criticise or to sell yourself on the basis of

rubbishing other people, to me is not a smart way

to go.

“These larger brewing companies have established

a quality proposition in that they produce a quality

product over and over and over again,” the

Professor said.

He also looked at ways that beer can learn from wine,

saying brewers should learn from the way the wine

industry champions its raw materials.

“They’ve only got one raw material and my god

can they BS about that raw material,” he said in his

opening keynote.

“We’ve got malt, hops, yeast and water, just for

starters. We can celebrate these things, and so we

should celebrate these things.”

He said brewers can also rightfully celebrate the

healthfulness of the product they make, when

consumed in moderation.

“We have confirmed that beer is the richest source

of silica in the diet, and this cuts down the risk of

osteoporosis,” he said.

“The next best source is muesli/granola – you choose

how you want to get your silica!”

Bamforth said beer also contains other minerals, as

well as antioxidants, B vitamins (especially folic acid)

and prebiotics.

“It is a healthful food but still people perceive wine as

being healthier,” he said.

The three-day conference also included a trade show

which highlighted the growth in the small brewing

industry, and the diversity of the businesses that

support it.

The Independent Brewers Association recently

released a report on the independent brewing

industry’s impact on the Australian economy prepared

by Essential Economics.

QHA REVIEW | 57


CRAFT BEER SHOWCASE

A BROUHAHA BREWING IN THE MOUNTAINS

QHA REVIEW | 58

Australians’ growing thirst for craft beer is creating

somewhat of a dilemma for many publicans. Boutique

breweries are popping up everywhere like daisies

competing with traditional pubs for patrons. The

growing penchant for these craft brews in some

regions leaves publicans questioning whether they

need to assign a greater part of their tap real estate

to accommodate these independent

brewery beers outside of their

mainstream suppliers, and if they do,

can that said craft brewer guarantee

supply day in, day out for 365 days

a year.

Stone & Wood Brewing Company,

founded in beautiful Byron Bay in

2008 is an example of the changing

times. The original Byron brewery is

a venue of sorts in its own right but

the popularity of its brews sees Stone

& Wood now on tap in virtually every

pub in town. The demand for Stone &

Wood is such that we can only guess

publicans were left to ponder the maxim, “If you can’t

beat them, join them”.

There is certainly no denying Australians’ perceptions

towards beer are changing. Various reports suggest

traditional beer consumption is declining year on year.

Mainstream breweries still retain such a large share

of the market in terms of volume but consumers are

demanding greater variety nowadays. Drinkers are

perhaps becoming more discerning in part due to a

greater exposure to the world through travel, the whole

gastronomy craze and a desire to support local. The

demand for locally-produced craft beer

is replicating what has taken place

with the Australian food industry. It is a

trend some media sources are referring

to as “paddock to pint”. No matter

what your take of it all may be, it serves

to underline why major breweries are

buying up craft breer brands like there

is no tomorrow and bringing out quite

a few of their own through various

partnerships with small independent

breweries.

The reason for highlighting these

interesting market dynamics and

encouraging debate is because it is

no more evident than on the Sunshine Coast where

no fewer than eight independent craft breweries now

exist. The Sunshine Coast hinterland is home to two of

these establishments; the Wild Rocket Micro-Brewery

in Montville and Brouhaha Brewery in Maleny. Their

appeal is immediately evident.


Photo: Courtesy of

Wild Rocket @ Misty’s

Wild Rocket @ Misty’s is situated in one of the most

historic buildings in Montville, the former ‘Fancy

Goods & Lolly Shop’. It’s incredibly quaint with owner

and chef Peter Brettell and his wife Belinda sourcing

only the best local produce and free range organic

meats. Indeed, everything is made onsite, from beef

sausages, breads, stock, sauces and even their jams

and chutneys, and in time it only stood to reason

they would produce their own locally-made beer to

compliment their fresh food offering.

The food at Wild Rocket has received rave reviews

on various online diner restaurant review sites, which

is the same for the beers, which include the Montville

Smooth Ale and a Black Jack Stout to mention but

two.

A little further south on the range is Brouhaha in

Maleny. Unassuming from the street, the brewery/

restaurant boasts an industrial-inspired interior and

on-trend decor to accentuate the steel brewing tanks

that line one wall. As for their beers, Brouhaha have

produced a wide range of drops - from Blonde to IPA

to Milk Stout and everything in between - with fine fare

perfectly matching their locally produced nectar of the

gods.

It is this pairing of fine food and hand-crafted beer

that is challenging traditional pubs for a share of

consumer’s wallets. Some may consider it just a

fad that will soon pass in time, what if it isn’t? The

preceding rise and rise of espresso bars might

suggest otherwise. Who would have predicted just

how popular these would become and now we have

craft distilleries hot on the heels of the independent

brewery phenomena. As always, times are changing

and it would pay to keep abreast of changing

IT IS THIS PAIRING OF FINE FOOD AND HAND-

CRAFTED BEER THAT IS CHALLENGING TRADITIONAL

PUBS FOR A SHARE OF CONSUMER’S WALLETS

consumer trends. The hotel industry certainly does

not want to follow in the footsteps of the taxi industry

who underestimated the impact of Uber and was

subsequently left decimated by it.

QHA REVIEW | 59


RENOVATION SHOWCASE

PRONTO PERFECTION

QHA REVIEW | 60

Woodson is Stoddart’s countertop kitchen equipment

brand that has led this market space since 1954.

Designed and manufactured in Australia for Australian

conditions, Woodson is renowned for its quality,

functionality and reliability.

Woodson offers a complete countertop kitchen

equipment range, including Starline conveyor ovens,

toaster grillers and salamanders, as well as countertop

fryers and bain maries. Woodson also manufacture

its own matching line-up of hot food displays and

cold food displays, in a variety of profiles to suit every

application.

Woodson is proud of its flexibility and the fact that

the Woodson range of products has been installed

in various commercial kitchens, such as cafes, quick

service restaurants, hotels, mining camps, take-away

restaurants, food courts, clubs and pubs.

In the fast-paced hospitality industry, delivering

quality foods in the shortest time is key to customer

satisfaction and retention. The Woodson Pronto

quick performance oven is compact, easy to operate

and puts the power of impingement cooking at

your fingertips. Impingement and intelligent air flow

technology achieve consistent cooking results while

toasting and finishing food items to perfection.

The Woodson Pronto oven offers the flexibility to

customize up to 50 programs on the user-friendly

touchscreen. Users can cook a variety of menu items

throughout the day that satisfies their customers as it

adapts to your growing business. Get the confidence

that comes from serving your customers with the

highest possible food quality at a fraction of the time,

every time.

Being a Stoddart brand, Woodson continues on

today as a 100% Australian family owned business,

with a state of the art manufacturing, distribution and

warehouse facility located in Brisbane. Additionally,

Stoddart also maintain high level stock and spare parts

at warehouses and sales offices in Sydney, Melbourne,

Perth and Adelaide. Through this strategically located

infrastructure and together with its national, third party

dealer and service network, Stoddart is able to provide

instant solutions to businesses throughout Australia

and the Asia Pacific region.

In business for over 60 years, you can rest assured

that your Woodson product will be there for your

business every day you open - year in year out.


RENOVATING WHILE RUNNING YOUR BUSINESS CAN

BE A NIGHTMARE!

The traditional method of renovating using an architect,

consultants, quantity surveyors, project manager and

a builder can be overwhelming and is usually a drawn

out procedure costing loss of trade and profit and

distracting you from running your business.

When adding up the true cost of an upgrade project,

few owners or managers include the downtime for

management and staff and what negative result it has

on your business by being distracted from what you do

best, run your business. There are also the time delays

in having to co-ordinate all the above consultants who

all work independently, let alone errors and oversights,

which will all be at your cost. Due to these delays I

have seen crucial deadlines not kept, costing further

income and profit to your business.

There is a growing trend towards Design and

Construction specialists to deliver a renovation where

the business continues to operate during the project

as you only have to deal with one company and you

have a much better chance of getting the project

completed on time and on budget.

Dr Donald Charrett BE(Hons), LLB(Hons), MConstLaw,

PhD, ProfCertArb, FIEAust, MIAM,. Barrister practising

in building and engineering … wrote in the Australian

Construction Law Newsletter about the trend towards

design-construct (or “turnkey”) project delivery in

Australia.

He points out that the advantage, from the principal’s

perspective, is that there’s a single contract that

delivers the entire project. The contractor carries the

risk, not the principal.

The traditional method of project delivery separates

design and construction contracts - and the principal

carries the risk.

Unfortunately all design and construction companies

are not alike as some are merely builders who

subcontract the design which does not provide you

with the combined experience to provide a truly

successful outcome.

Hot Concepts is different, we have the business

consultants, designers, architects, project managers,

builders and fitout tradesmen on staff plus we work

with a loyal team of sub-contractors who not only

understand our passion to deliver you the best result,

they consistently provide the best pricing and service.

We take care of the project from start to finish ensuring

you save time and money without distracting you from

running your business.

If you want to see how painless a renovation can be

please feel free to call us on (07) 3277 7740.

QHA REVIEW | 61


TRADE DIRECTORY

CASINO CONSOLES

Footrest, slimline and cashless bases

available. Casino Consoles, the only

name you need when it comes to

professional poker machine bases

and screening.

P: 07 3890 2969

www.casinoconsoles.com.au

COMMERCIAL FITOUTS

Bars, Clubs, Cafes, Restaurants.

Specialists in unique and premium

nationwide commercial fit-outs for

clubs, bars, cafes and restaurants.

P: 1300 426 637 (1300 HAMMER)

E: sales@clubbarconcepts.com.au

www.clubbarconcepts.com.au

SCIENTIFIC GAMES

This new generation of exciting game

content draws on the strength of

Scientific Games to create one of

the most dynamic game libraries

in the market.

P: 07 3458 9180

www.sggaming.com/australia

REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS

Time to upgrade your beverage and refrigeration systems?

Call us for expert advice and all your requirements including:

Quality beer dispensing equipment | Ice machines |

Refrigeration | Custom solutions for all venue sizes | AS5034

Compliancing | Sales, Installation, 24/7 Service.

Phone: 07 3422 0011 www.allsocool.com.au

BEER DISPENSING SYSTEMS - Sales - Service - Installation

Refrigeration | Glycol Equipment | Beer Gas Equipment

| Beerline Cleaning | Electronic Spirit Dispensers | 24/7

Maintenance, Servicing and Repairs. Australia’s largest

manufacturer, installer and suppler to beer dispensing

equipment. Proudly Australian Owned and Operated.

5 Holden Street, Woolloongabba, QLD 4102

Phone: 07 3421 5200 www.andale.com.au

QHA REVIEW | 62

PRESTIGE GAMING STOOLS

Comfort at Play

Karo Australia Pty Ltd

P: 02 9980 1431

E: info@karo.com.au

www.karo.com.au

DOWNTOWN DOMESTICS

Too busy to get domestic?

Window cleaning | Building washing

Housekeeping | Carpet / Upholstery

Cleaning | Bond / Spring cleaning |

Emergency cleaning | Pest control.

P: 1300 386 963

www.downtowndomestics.com

CITY PROPERTY SERVICES

Over 25 years of commercial cleaning

services | Compliant with ISA 9001

| Quality assurance | EcoClean

Certified using environmentally

friendly products | Free quotations.

P: 07 3391 2005

www.citypropertyservices.com


TRADE DIRECTORY

PROUD PLATINUM PARTNERS OF THE QHA.

COMPLETE FACILITY MANAGEMENT SPECIALISTS

Brisbane | Gladstone | Gold Coast | Sunshine Coast |

Mackay | Toowoomba | Townsville | Wide Bay. Hospitality

cleaning specialist, Hotel refurbishments, Lawns & ground

maintenance, Property & asset management, High pressure

cleaning/ non slip solution specialists.

P: 1800 262 637

www.cmbm.com.au

GLASS RECYCLING MANAGEMENT

Save time, space, money, people and the environment.

Reduce bottle noise inside and outside your venue, Improve

workplace health and safety, Reduce space needed for glass

waste bins, Save money on your current waste charges

Free trial call 1300 306 039 E: info@bottlecycler.com

www.bottlecycler.com

INTEGRATED POS SOLUTIONS

As used by Award Winning Hotels. New Compact

10” Touch Screens available. 10” & 15” Hotel and Bar

POS Solutions.

P: 1300 BIZSTAR 1300 249 782

E: reg@bizstar.com.au

www.uniwell4pos.com.au to find out more.

PUBLIC

NOTICE SIGNS

PUBLIC NOTICE SIGNS

For all Gaming and Liquor Notice of Application signage in

compliance with Act. Please phone for a free quotation to

create, install, remove, sign on your site.

P: 07 3862 2426

E: veronica@publicanoticesigns.com.au

MARKET LEADING BRANDS IN EQUIPMENT

No matter the size, shape or demands placed on your

business, we have the ability to deliver equipment that is

functional, adaptable and reliable. Convotherm, Waldorf,

Waldorf Bold, Turbofan, Washtech.

Phone: 1800 023 953 E: info@moffat.com.au

Service department: 1800 622 216

QHA REVIEW | 63


QHA PARTNERS & CORPORATE MEMBERS

QHA PARTNERS AND CORPORATE MEMBERS ARE VALUED PREFERRED SUPPLIERS TO THE QUEENSLAND HOTEL INDUSTRY.

THE BUSINESSES LISTED IN THIS DIRECTORY ARE KEEN SUPPORTERS OF HOTELS IN QUEENSLAND AND THE QHA ENCOURAGES

MEMBER HOTELS TO UTILISE THEIR PRODUCTS AND SERVICES. IF A BUSINESS WISHES TO FIND OUT HOW TO BECOME A QHA

PARTNER OR CORPORATE MEMBER, PLEASE CALL DAMIAN STEELE, QHA INDUSTRY ENGAGEMENT MANAGER ON (07) 3221 6999.

QHA REVIEW | 64

ACCOUNTING/ TAX

FTI Consulting

Ph: 07 3225 4900

www.fticonsulting.com

Hanrick Curran -

Chartered Accountants

Ph: 07 3218 3900

www.hanrickcurran.

com.au

HLB Mann Judd -

Chartered Accountants

Ph: 07 3001 8800

www.hlb.com.au

McGrath Nicol

Ph: 07 3333 9800

www.mcgrathnicol.com

PJT Accountants &

Business Advisors

Ph: 07 5413 9300

www.pjtaccountants.com.au

Professional Client Services

(QLD) P/L- Accountants &

Business Advisors

Ph: 07 3209 4452

www.pcsqld.com.au

Prosperity Advisers QLD

Ph: 07 3007 1971

www.prosperityadvisers.

com.au

ARCHITECTS /

REFURBISHMENT/

RECONSTRUCTION /

REPAIRS

Brand & Slater

Architects P/L

Ph: 07 3252 8899

www.brandandslater.

com.au

Darren S Dickfos Architects

Ph: 07 3358 1786

www.ddarchitects.com.au

Club Bar Concepts

Ph: 1300 426 637

clubbarconcepts.com.au

Darren S Dickfos Architects

Ph: 07 3358 1786

Web: www.ddarchitects.

com.au

Hot Concepts Design and

Construction

Ph: 07 3277 7740

www.hotconcepts.com.au

One Alliance Project

Consulting

Ph: 1300 853 123

www.oneallianceprojects.

com.au

Paynter Dixon - Design &

Construction

Ph: 07 3368 5500

www.paynter.com.au

Rohrig Hospitality

Ph: 07 3257 4411

www.rohrlg.com.au

Unita Group

Ph: 1300 659 399

www.unita.com.au

BEVERAGES

Accolade Wines,

Ph: 07 3252 7933

www.accolade-wlnes.

com

Asahi Premium

Beverages

Ph: 07 3868 2388

www.schweppes.com.au

Brown-Forman

Australia P/L

Ph: 07 3010 2000

www.brown-forman.com

Carlton & United

Breweries

Ph: 07 3666 4104

www.cub.com.au

Coca-Cola Amatil

Ph: 13 26 53

www.ccamatil.com

Diageo

Ph: 07 3257 0800

www.diageo.com

Lion

Ph: 07 3361 7400

www.lion-nathan.com.au

Liquor Marketing Group

Ph: 07 3246 5272

www.bottlemart.com.au

Red Bull Australia

Ph: 02 9023 2892

www.redbull.com.au

Samuel Smith & Son

Ph: 07 3373 5777

www.samsmith.com

Sirromet Wines

Ph: 07 3206 2999

www.sirromet.com

Treasury Wine Estates

Ph: 03 9685 8000

www.treasurywineestates.

com

EDUCATION, TRAINING

& EMPLOYMENT

Availio

Ph: 07 3218 3900

www.hanrickcurran.com.au

Best Security - Security

and Training

Ph: 07 3212 8460

www.bestsecurlty.net.au

Foundation Education

Ph: 1300 130 157

www.foundationeducation.

com.au

Frontier Leadership

Ph: 0423 097 246

www.frontierleadership.edu.au

Industry Graduates

Ph: 1300 038 000

www.industrygraduates.com

Nystrom Relief Managers

Ph: 0487 205 285

www.nystromreliefmanagers.

com.au

Professional Hospitality

Ph: 07 3160 8132

www.professionalhospitality.

com.au

Sidekicker

Ph: 1300 098 375

www.sidekicker.com.au

St John Ambulance Australia

Ph: 07 3253 0552

www.stjohnqld.com.au

ENERGY GAS/POWER

ELGAS

Ph: 131161

www.elgas.com.au

Leading Edge Energy

Ph: 1300 852 770

www.leadingedgeenergy.

com.au

Make It Cheaper

Ph: 1300 957 721

www.makeitcheaper.com.au

TransTasman Energy Group

Ph: 1300 118 834

www.tteg.com.au

FINANCES, BANKING,

INSURANCE &

INVESTMENTS

AON Risk Services -

QHA Insurance Brokers

Ph: 07 3223 7512

www.aon.com.au

Ausure Insurance Brokers

SEQ

Ph: 1300 450 663

www.ausureseq.com.au

Banktech

Ph: 1800 080 910

www.banktech.com.au

Bepoz Retail Solutions

Ph: 1300 023 769

www.bepoz.com.au

BUPA - health insurance

Ph: 134135

(quote ID 2109197)

www.bupa.com.au

CashPoint Payment Solutions

Ph: 1300 286 626

www.cashpoint.com.au

Green Finance Group

Ph: 0457 883 700

www.greenfinancegroup.

com.au

Hanrick Curran –

Chartered Accountants

Ph: 07 3218 3900

www.hanrickcurran.com.

au

lnCash ATMS

Ph: 1300 800 660

www.incash.com.au

Integrity Corporate Finance

Ph: 02 9268 3088

www.integrityfinancegroup.

com.au

Silverchef

Ph: 07 3335 3392

www.silverchef.com.au

St. George Corporate &

Business Bank

Ph: 07 3232 8911

www.stgeorge.com.au/

corporate-business

Westpac Banking

Corporation

Ph: 07 3350 7750

www.westpac.com.au

FOOD & ASSOCIATED

BUSINESSES

Bitesize Coffee Treats

Ph: 02 9723 6500

www.bitesizecoffeetreats.com

PFD Food Services

Ph: 07 3906 9726

www.pfdfoods.com.au

GAMING AND RACING

Ainsworth Game

Technology P/L

Ph: 07 3209 6210

www.ainsworth.com.au

Aristocrat Leisure industries

Ph: 07 3801 4444

www.aristocrat.com.au

Bytecraft Systems -

Gaming Machine Service

Ph: 07 3456 3345

www.bytecraft.com.au

Casino Consoles Australia

Ph: 07 3890 2969

www.casinoconsoles.com.au

IGT

Ph: 07 3890 5622

www.igt.com.au

Karo - gaming stools

Ph: 02 9980 1431

www.karo.com.au


QHA PARTNERS & CORPORATE MEMBERS

QHA PLATINUM PARTNERS

Konami Australia

Ph: 02 9666 3111

www.konamiaustralia.com.au

Sky Channel

Ph: 07 3228 6344

Freecall: 1800 251 710

www.skychannel.com.au

Max Queensland

Ph: 07 3637 1235

www.maxgaming.com.au

HOTEL & BAR SUPPLIES

Scientific Gaming

Ph: 02 9773 0299

www.scientiflcgames.com

Tabcorp Keno

Ph: 07 3243 4113

www.tabcorp.com.au

Andale Beverage Systems

Ph: 07 3421 5200

www.andale.com.au

Ausworld Commercial

Furniture & Design

Ph: 0409 264 212

www.ausworldfurniture.com.au

QHA DIAMOND PARTNERS

UBET

Ph: 07 3637 1370

www.ubet.com

BOC Limited -Gas/

Reticulation Supply

Ph: 07 3212 4322

www.boc.com.au

HOSPITALITY

CONSULTANTS

Commercial Licensing

Specialists

Ph: 07 5526 0112

www.clslicensing.com.au

Hunter Technologies

Ph: 1300 693 357t

www.cellarcontrol.com.au

HOTEL BROKERS /

REAL ESTATE /

PROPERTY VALUERS

QHA GOLD PARTNERS

DWS Hospitality

Specialists

Ph: 07 3878 9355

www.dws.net

Clark Real Estate

CRE Hotel Brokers

Ph: 07 5371 0165

www.crebrokers.com

Graham Brown - Liquor

& Gaming Licences

Ph: 07 3300 1578

CBRE Hotels

Ph: 0418 886 525

www.cbrehotels.com

Professional Hospitality

Ph: 07 3160 8132

www.professionalhospitality.

com.au

Knight Frank Australia

Ph: 07 3246 8888

www.knightfrank.com.au

Silver Chef

Ph: 07 3335 3392

www.silverchef.com.au

HOTEL ENTERTAINMENT

Knight Frank Valuations

Ph: 07 3193 6800

www.knightfrank.com.au

Landmark White

Ph: 07 3226 0002

www.landmarkwhite.com.au

Fox Sports

Ph: 0403 061 412

www.foxsports.com.au

Foxtel for Business

Ph: 1300 720 630

www.austar.com.au

Nightlife - Music & Video

Freecall: 1800 679 748

www.nightlife.com.au

Pro Score - Sporting

Promotions

Ph: 0431 366 800

www.proscore.com.au

Recharge DJs

Ph: 1300 836 832

www.rechargedjs.com

MVS National Mackay

Whitsundays

Ph: 07 4847 0737

www.mvsvaluers.com.au

Power Jeffrey & Co -

Hotel Brokers

Ph: 07 3832 6000

www.powerjeffrey.com.au

Ray White Hotels

Ph: 02 8016 3810

www.raywhite.com.au

QHA SILVER PARTNERS

Green Finance Group

QHA BRONZE PARTNERS

Power Jeffrey and Company

Best Security

Black & White Cabs

Rohrig Group

St George Bank

Red Bull Australia

Brand+Slater Architects

BOC Limited

Paynter Dixon

Prosperity Advisers QLD

QHA REVIEW | 65


APPROVED

MANAGER’S

LICENCE

LEGAL

Bennett & Philp Lawyers

Ph: 07 3001 2999

www.bennettphilp.com.au

Broadley Rees Hogan Lawyers

Ph: 07 3223 9121

www.brhlawyers.com.au

Commercial Licensing

Specialists

Ph: 07 5526 0112

www.clslicensing.com.au

Challenger Services Group

Ph: 07 5668 3133

www.csgroup.com.au

CMBM Facility Services

Ph: 07 3391 1040 /

0419 708 715

www.cmbm.com.au

Tru Security Services

Phone: 0452 377 662

Web: www.trusecurity.com.au

SUPERANNUATION

RESPONSIBLE MANAGEMENT

OF LICENSED VENUES

TRAINING

Corrs Chambers

Westgarth - Lawyers

Ph: 07 3228 9778

www.corrs.com.au

McMahon Clarke

Ph: 07 3831 8999

www.mcmahonclarke.com

Big Ass Fans

Ph: 1300 244 277

www.bigassfans.com.au

Hanrick Curran

Superannuation

Ph: 07 3218 3900

www.hanrickcurran.com.au

“HONESTLY THE BEST TRAINING

SESSION! FUN AND LIGHT-HEARTED

Mullins Lawyers

Ph: 07 3224 0222

Curt Schatz - direct

Ph: 07 3224 0230

www.mullinslaw.com.au

LIQUOR BUYING GROUPS

lntrust Super Fund

Ph: 07 3013 8700

www.intrust.com.au

TECHNOLOGICAL

PRODUCTS

& SERVICES

WHILE BEING VERY INFORMATIVE AND

KNOWLEDGEABLE. THANKS, QHA.”

Liquor Marketing Group

(Bottlemart)

Ph: 1300 733 504

www.bottlemart.com.au

Bytecraft Systems

Ph: 07 3456 3345

www.bytecraft.com.au

OTHER COURSES OFFERED:

LIQUOR WHOLESALE

GROUPS

First2Click

Ph: 1300 765 385

www.unidapsolutions.com.au

Online RSA/RSG Training

Gaming Nominee Training

Employment Relations Training

Employment Relations Webinar

ALM (Australian Liquor

Marketers)

Brisbane: Ph: 07 3489 3600

Townsville: Ph: 07 4799 4022

Cairns: Ph: 07 4041 6070

www.almliquor.com.au

JB Hi-Fi Commercial

Division

Ph: 07 3360 9925

www.jbhifi.com.au

PRINTING / GRAPHIC

DESIGN

QIKID

Ph: 1300 553 256

www.qikid.com

QHA REVIEW | 66

Responsible Management of Licensed Venues

Training is a mandatory training requirement

for those applying for a liquor licence, and

applicants for an Approved Manager’s Licence.

Training is offered face to face at regional

centres throughout Queensland.

For more information please contact the

QHA Training Centre

Ph: 07 3221 6999 Fax: 07 3221 6649

Email: training@qha.org.au

Web: www.qha.org.au

Easil - Graphic Design

Ph: 1300 032 745

www.easil.com

Platypus

Ph 07 3352 0300

www.platypusgraphics.com

SECURITY / CLEANING

Best Security

Ph: 07 3212 8460

www.bestsecurity.net.au

Cap Security Services Pty Ltd

Ph: 07 3892 7777

www.capsecurity.com.au

City Property Services

Ph: 07 3391 2005

www.citypropertyservices.co

Clear to Work - Police Checks

Ph: 07 3899 1123

www.cleartowork.com.au

Scantek Solutions

Ph: 1300 552 106

www.scantek.com.au

Time Target

Ph: 07 3137 1133

www.timetarget.com

TRANSPORT

A.P. Eagers Limited

Ph: 07 3109 6731

www.apeagers.com.au

Black and White Cabs

Ph: 07 3860 1800

www.blackandwhltecabs.

com.au

WASTE MANAGEMENT

Bottlecycler

Ph: 0434 416 540

www.bottlecyler.com

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