Wanted in Rome DEC 2021

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THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE MAGAZINE IN ROME

Poste Italiane S.p.a. Sped. in abb. post. DL 353/2003 (Conv. in L 27/02/2004 N.46) art. 1 comma 1 Aut. C/RM/04/2013 - Anno 13, Numero 11 DECEMBER 2021 | € 2,00

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ON

WHERE TO GO IN ROME

ART AND CULTURE ENTERTAINMENT GALLERIES

MUSEUMS NEWS

00011


CONT

EDITORIALS MISCELLANY WHAT'S ON

4. Dante's Inferno can

still create images

of hell on earth

today

Mary Wilsey

10. PIETRO DA CORTONA:

ROME’S THIRD BAROQUE

GENIUS

Martin Bennett

14. CHRISTMAS CRIBS AND

NATIVITY SCENES IN ROME

Andy devane

16. LAKES AROUND ROME

18. ROME FOR children

20. STREET ART guide

22. MUSEUMS

24. ART GALLERIES

40. CULTURAL VENUES

42. Wanted in rome junior

45. RECIPE

46. puntarella rossa

50. USEFUL NUMBERS

30. EXHIBITIONS

32. ART news

34. OPERA

36. Classical

38. Dance

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Finito di stampare il 30/11/2021

Poste Italiane S.p.a. Sped. in abb. post. DL 353/2003 (Conv. in L 27/02/2004 N.46) art. 1 comma 1 Aut. C/RM/04/2013 - Anno 13, Numero 11 DECEMBER 2021 | € 2,00

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ENTS

4

Dante's Inferno can still create

images of hell on earth today

30 10

EXHIBITIONS

PIETRO DA CORTONA:

ROME’S THIRD BAROQUE GENIUS

38

classical


Art

DANTE'S INFERNO CAN STILL

CREATE IMAGES OF HELL

ON EARTH TODAY

SCUDERIE DEL QUIRINALE TAKES VISITORS ON A

HELLISH TOUR INSPIRED BY DANTE'S INFERNO

Mary Wilsey

The exhibition Inferno at Scuderie del

Quirinale, open until 9 January, marks the

700th anniversary of the death of Dante

Alighieri. Coming shortly after the show on Raffaele,

to mark the 500th anniversary of the painter's birth,

this is another feather in the Scuderie's cap.

While the Raffaele exhibition had to shut because

of the covid-19 lockdown, L'Inferno was organised

during the pandemic. It is an impressive achievement

that the curator and French art historian, Jean Clair,

together with the Le Scuderie del Qurinale, managed

to put together 232 works, from 87 collections

and 15 countries at a time when the world was

effectively still in lockdown, or at least not working

at its normal pace.

It is strange therefore that images of plagues and

their various manifestations are nowhere to be

seen in this exhibition. How many pandemics over

the centuries have created their own versions of

hell, death, fear, anxiety, loneliness and economic

Dante in exile by Domenico Petarlini (1897).

4 | December 2021Wanted in Rome


Gli orrori della guerra: l’esodo by Gaetano Previati (1917).

devastation? Perhaps the pandemic is still too close

to us, too difficult to understand, to have been

included in this exhibition.

Clair first thought up the idea of an exhibition on

the subject of hell in happier times, back in 2006. It

was turned down when he suggested it to the Prado.

Perhaps that was not the right moment, when

thoughts of hell and the devil had almost vanished

from the public sphere. So it was not until the

Scuderie approached the French art historian to

mark the 700th anniversary of the death of Dante

that the exhibition at the Quirinale came into being.

The anniversary of Dante's death was a good reason

to look at the theme of hell. But as Clair himself

explains, this exhibition is not only about Dante

and the first book of The Divine Comedy. It is about

the manifestations of hell on earth. Starting with

the portrayal of hell and the devil in the teachings

of the Mediaeval Church, it follows through with

more recent manifestations of hell, such as war,

the dehumanisation of the industrial revolution,

genocide, mental illness, terrorism. It is all the

more surprising therefore that it completely ignores

plague as one of its hells.

The exhibition begins with the silent film

Inferno made in 1911 by Francesco Bertolini.

Here anyone who has read, or set out to read,

the first book of The Divine Comedy will feel at

home. Not surprisingly the seats at the top of

the first magnificent flight of the Scuderie stairs

are occupied mainly by young students, probably

well-versed in their Dante. For those who want

to move on quickly to the rest of this exhibition

there is another chance to see the film on the

way out.

The first few rooms are dominated by scenes of

multitudes of writhing, naked bodies in various

states of agony and confusion. One of the first

examples is La Caduta degli Angeli Rebelli by

Francesco Bertos (1750), carved from a single

piece of Carrara marble. Another is a small

painting Gli Inferi (1622) by Monsù Desiderio

(François de Nome) who worked most of his

life in Naples. The painting from the Bresançon

Museum of Art and Archaeology stands out for

its composition, lighting, perspective and sheer

complexity of the array of small white bodies

writhing their way across the scene.

However it is unquestionably the plaster of

Rodin's massive unfinished Gates of Hell inspired

by Dante's Inferno that dominates the early

part of the exhibition. Its 180 figures were a

foundation for much of Rodin's subsequent work,

as is evident from some of the smaller figures

on display in the exhibition. Rodin worked on

the Gates of Hell most of his life but was never

satisfied and never finished them completely. Not

long before he died in 1917 he gave the drawings

and sculptures to the French state but they were

not finally cast in bronze until 1928.

Wanted in Rome • December 2021 | 5


Their sheer size acts as both an inspiration for

visitors to the exhibition and a barrier. In order to

get the correct perspective the Gates are set so far

back in the room that it is difficult to manoeuvre

around them, especially when they are blocked

by a guided group of visitors. The Gates have

a fascinating history of their own, but for the

purposes of this exhibition it is exciting enough

to see the central figure, originally called The Poet,

after Dante of course, but which became the model

for The Thinker, one of the world's best-loved pieces

of sculpture.

In sharp contrast to Rodin's massive Gates are the

paintings of Dante alongside Virgil guiding him

through hell. The red of Dante's clothing lightens

the unremitting darkness of the exhibition space

and his well-known face is comfortingly familiar

compared with all the paintings of contorted

bodies in the first few rooms. Even the pensive

and sorrowful portrait from the Uffizi of Dante in

Exile by Domenico Petarlini (1897) is better than

the visions of hell that come before it.

La Caduta degli Angeli Rebelli by Francesco Bertos (1750).

A series of sensitive contemporary mixed media

works by Miquel Barceló, who produced 300

illustrations between 2000 and 2002 for The

Divine Comedy, lighten the gloom in one of the

following rooms. They manage to convey Barceló's

own feeling of just how contemporary The Divine

Comedy still is today.

Up the winding stairs to the next floor and the

scene of Sicilian puppets brings a welcome relief,

well explained in its label:

"Nella cultura popolare l'inferno e il diavolo assumono

a volte un carattere meno minaccioso o additura

burlesco, che esprime al contempo la paura che ispirano

e la possibilità di sconfiggerlo."

For a moment the prevailing feeling of evil shifts

as the emphasis of the exhibition moves away from

visions of hell to the devil himself, a character once

so feared in religious belief but now dismissed as

superstitious nonsense in contemporary society.

Next comes a series of paintings, one by Cézanne,

on the Temptations of St Anthony of Egypt. The

key to these is not so much the small Cézanne

but the work by the Neapolitan painter Domenico

Morelli painted in 1878 and probably influenced

by Flaubert's prose poem of the same name.

Here is a mix of eroticism and mysticism, realism

and symbolism, with St Anthony centre stage,

Gates of Hell by Auguste Rodin.

clutching his cloak around him, as he stares into

the far distance to avoid the temptations of two

seductive women clearly enjoying their efforts to

drive the desert father to desperation.

From these temptations in a religious key the

exhibition moves to the hell on earth of the 19th and

20th centuries. The subjects make a devastatingly

long list; industrialisation, the brutality of

6 | December 2021Wanted in Rome


two world wars, death and disfiguration, the

extermination of the concentration camps, the

Holocaust, madness, terrorism. The canvases

crowded with desperate bodies are back, pushing

up against each other, either in death or trying

to avoid it. The painting by Gaetano Previati, Gli

orrori della guerra: l’esodo (1917) shows civilians

fleeing death in a scene that is all too familiar

today, whether of Afghanis pushing in desperation

to climb on to get-away planes at Kabul airport or

of cold, starving refugees on the Belarus border

forced up against the barbed wire across the

Polish frontier.

One painting stands out among the others, La

Matta by Giacomo Balla (1905) from the National

Gallery in Rome. The woman illustrates another

form of hell, of the inability to control one's body,

of loneliness and isolation. The lone woman

stands at an open door, alone but not alone, as she

desperately attempts to control her movements and

to communicate with someone inside the room.

From one agony to another, to that of disfigured

faces, plaster casts of faces disfigured by the

wounds of war, the living dead. Here is the

double tragedy not just of the physical pain of

the disfigured faces but also of the annihilation of

their previous identity.

Moving into the next room the original typescript

of Primo Levi's If this is a Man, the testimony to

his time in Auschwitz, seems shockingly down

to earth. Here are pages familiar to anyone who

grew up with typewriters; the crossings out,

the additions, the re-writings, the painstaking

afterthoughts before a work is finally sent to

the publisher. The onlooker cannot help feeling

guilty to be looking so dispassionately at this

sanitised version of the Holocaust, of what is left

of that desperate suffering and subsequent pain.

The Twin Towers in Flames (2003) by British

sculptor Raymond Mason doesn't manage to

convey the shock of that out-of-the-blue event

but it takes the exhibition right up to date and

conveys once again the crowding, the lack of

space, of bodies pushing up against each other in

terror and horror.

Then finally, in the last section, we are out to the

stars, almost as though we were clambering out

of that hell-hole ourselves in those wonderful last

lines of Dante's L'inferno.

La Matta by Giacomo Balla (1905).

E senza cura aver d'alcun riposo

salimmo su, el primo e io secondo,

tanto ch'i' vidi delle cose belle

che porta 'l ciel, per un pertugio tondo --

e quindi uscimmo a riveder le stelle.

"And with no rest from the fatigue of it,

We clambered up, he first, till finally I saw the

heavenly spheres

Through a round hole, the aperture whence we

Emerged to look once more upon the stars".

Two works by Anselm Keifer end the exhibition but

we aren't quite out of hell yet. There is something

challenging about Stelle Cadente (1995). Here is a

man on his back under the stars, motionless with

his eyes shut, as though there were something

troubling and challenging him as he lies in a deathlike

position. Is it wonder or fear? as he lies in a

death-like position. Is it wonder or fear?

It is only as we walk down the magnificent final

staircase of Le Scuderie, with its view over the

roof tops of Rome, off to the dome of St Peter's in

the distance, that we are finally able to leave those

images of hell behind.

8 | December 2021Wanted in Rome


Wanted in Rome • December 2021 | 9


Art

PIETRO DA CORTONA:

ROME’S THIRD BAROQUE

GENIUS

CORTONA COMPETES WITH TWO MORE FAMOUS

CONTEMPORARIES

Martin Bennett

Open any guide-book and, to reduce fame

to a crude word-count, the Bs have it:

Bernini and Borromini. Or vice-versa. Part

alphabetical/alliterative coincidence perhaps, part

their biographically fascinating rivalry, Bernini and

Borromini have tended to push Pietro da Cortona

Rome’s third Baroque genius to the background.

Right of SS. Maria Maggiore’s altar Bernini’s simple

grave-slab contains the phrase ‘DECUS ARTIUM

ET URBIS’/ glory of arts and city. The same could

be said of Pietro da Cortona. Spectacular ceilings,

tapestries, fresco-cycles, church and palace façades

and an entire church, SS. Luca e Martina, in the

Roman Forum. His work adorns Rome, and also

beyond.

Like Bernini’s father, Cortona was Tuscan, together

with the same-named town (Cortona) the painter,

a.k.a Pietro Berrettini, is named after. And it was

Florentine merchant-banker/ecclesiastical family,

the Sacchetti, who supplied his first commissions.

He designed one of the family villas, the sincedemolished

Casa del Pigneto – out along Via Aurelia,

north of the Tiber – and brilliantly reproduced it on

canvas. Undepicted are the mosquitoes which would

soon make the palace uninhabitable. Between the

Tiber and a sail-flecked sea, the building stands

spotlit by a break in the clouds.

Cortona's vast Allegory of Divine Providence and Barberini

Power marked a watershed in Baroque painting.

In the Sachetti family’s second/substitute ‘casa’, 66

Via Giulia, his portrait of Cardinal Giulio Sacchetti

(now in Galleria Borghese) was long the salone’s

centre-piece. For the cardinal’s brother, Marcello,

there were a series of early paintings eventually

passed down to the Capitoline museum. One is a

haunting depiction of Marcello, a model of taste

10 | December 2021Wanted in Rome


and elegance. An anxious/melancholy gaze and the

left hand clutching a white handerchief suggests

the illness causing the nobleman’s untimely death

(1629).

Tuscan connections recurring, when Maffeo

Barberini (from another exiled Florentine family)

became pope, Marcello Sacchetti was appointed

his general and secret treasurer. Pietra da Cortona,

talent already proven, was in the right place and at

the right time, progressing from Sacchetti painter/

architect to papal one. But, unlike occasionally

volatile Bernini and the infamously grumpy

Borromini, Cortona with his reassuringly stable

character wasn’t inclined to throw such opportunities

away. To quote art historian Jorg Merz, “He moved

gently through Rome’s quarrelsome artistic world,

avoiding the limelight.” Writing in 1736, Pascoli

(one of Cortona’s biographers) describes him as

“friendly and charming, courteous and wary when

he spoke of himself.”

And so to his frescoes in S. Bibiana, where in 1624,

during fitful renovation work, masons came upon

two urns. Given the church’s associations with the

family home of the Roman martyr, the pope quickly

identified the remains as the saint’s, and a favourable

omen for his papacy. Sacchetti providing funding,

renovation was stepped up. Bernini assumed

architectural duties, Cortona that of painting one of

the three naves. The church nowadays stands like

an abandoned ship between Termini’s numerous

rail-tracks.

‘Se piove pe’ Santa Bibiana, piove quaranta giorni e

un’ settimana’ goes a local proverb. (If it rains

on S. Bibiana’s Day, it’ll rain for 40 days and a

week.) And Cortona’s frescoes (of the saint refusing

to worship pagan gods, and her subsequent

martyrdom) are interwoven with motifs depicting

lush fruit and foliage. The bucolic imagery points

back to the fertility of Horti Liciniani outside, a

source of herbs against nervous disorders, the saint

appropriating curative powers previously attributed

to the Minerva Medicina Roman temple down the

road (Via Giolitti.)

Cortona and Bernini next meet in the Capitoline

Museums. In Cortona’s theatrical and life-sized

Rape of the Sabine Women. Like the sculptor, Cortona

designed masques and stage-sets and two figures in

the foreground seem familiar; their poses borrow

from Bernini’s Daphne and Apollo/ Pluto and

Proserpine statues. Hereby saving costs of a model?

The Baroque façade of S. Maria della Pace was added by

Cortona at the behest of Pope Alexander VII.

From his apprenticeship under Domenichino,

Cortona was a prolific drawer; sculptures and friezes

supplied a repertoire of ready-made, dramaticallyproven

stances. Yet, adopting the then-fashionable

idea that painting and poetry are sides of the same

coin, Cortona would add any number of imaginative,

sometimes humorous touches of his own.

In his Triumph of Bacchus in the Capitoline Museums,

for example, an infant centaur totters on the tips of

his hooves to peer inside an amphora. Offsetting the

classical fixities of the temple behind is the rollicking

energy of the god’s entourage. A riot of colour as

well as limbs, critics citing the influence of Rubens

who had passed through Rome not long before

(1606-8). Cortona’s versality continues in a ‘protolandscape’

of the alum mine to which Pope Urban

had awarded the Sacchetti family a monopoly.

Inside Palazzo Barberini Cortona takes a leap in

scale. Climb either stairway – Borromini’s spiral or

Bernini’s grand, if-more-conventional, equivalent

– the ceiling in the Salone hosts another triumph,

‘The Allegory of Divine Providence and Barberini

Power.’ Cortona directs a cast of hundreds.

Artist fees often depended on just that, the number

of figures portrayed, here to the princely tune of

4000 ducats. Temperance, Religion and Piety

personified, occupy their respective clouds. Fury,

disarmed, reclines on his weapons. Dunce Titans

get flunked by a spear-wielding Minerva. Crane

your neck some more and there’s Hercules clubbing

Avarice’s harpies. At ceiling’s centre hover, like

heraldic aeroplanes, so-called ‘bomber bees’, the

Barberini symbole.

Images of nepotism? Cortona a servant of power?

But wait. Off to one side Silenus, the boozy centaur,

appears to slip Providence’s gaze. As he’s poured

another drink, the glorious slob, on transfer for

“The Triumph of Bacchus”, almost steals the

scene. Cortona, then, is a secret satirist? Except,

Wanted in Rome • December 2021 | 11


Art

this piece of street theatre’s effect that a wall-notice

stipulates the design be in no way changed by future

generations. Today’s crowds keep to nearby Piazza

Navona. Comparatively secluded, Piazza della Pace,

matching its name, remains one of Roma’s most

delightful squares. And to think Cortona claimed

his architecture was a mere hobby…

Also little visited in SS. Luca and Martina. As

tourists shuttle between the Roman Forum and

Campidoglio, the church is easily overlooked, which

is a pity, given its beautiful crypt. Cortona’s work

actually began back under Pope Urban, inspired,

as with S. Bibiana, by concurrent exhumation of

a saint – Martina. The remains’ authenticity has

since been contested*, but initially fortune and/or

providence seemed in Cortona’s favour. Until his

patron, Cardinal Francesco Barberini, was accused

by Innocent X of embezzlement and fled to France.

A seven year interruption ensued. After which

Cortona’s work started again, this time on the upper

church, including rose-stuccoed dome and the floor

where he would eventually be buried.

Self portrait by Pietro da Cortona.

from his sympathetic portrait of Urban VIII back

in the Capitoline Museums one may hazard that

the Barberini pope is smiling too. The ceiling could

have turned out differently. While Cortona was away

decorating Florence’s Pitti Palace, two overweening

assistants determined to complete the masterwork

on their own. However their presumption was

checked when the intonaco / plaster ran out,

stuccatori’s / plasterers’ pay having fallen in arrears.

Urban’s papacy once ended, Barberini cardinals

having fled to France, one might expect a downturn

in Cortona’s fortunes. But, talent and tact ever to

the fore, he was soon decorating pro-Spanish

Innocent X’s Pamphilij palace/ new power-centre in

Piazza Navona with “Stories of Aeneas.” Ownership

currently resting with the Brazilian embassy, the

fresco-cycle is visitable twice a week for guided

tours in Italian and Portuguese.

Under Alexander VII, Cortona’s first Chigi

commission was S. Maria della Pace.

The facade of the new church, alternating concave

and convex a la Borromini, conjured harmony from

urban mess. Better seen than described, a confined

space suddenly seemed much larger. So pleasing was

Out of envy or no, some of Cortona’s fellow S. Luca

academicians suspected a plot to turn the church,

(his ‘beloved daughter’ he called it) into a private

mausoleum**. The lower church was roped off

and a six-year controversy broke out. Accusing the

academicians of obtructionism, Cortona’s supporters

prevailed, duly placing in the lower church a more

fulsome wall-plaque/cenonotaph and bust.

Not that Cortona ceased painting altogether. Next

door to the rippling façade of Borromini’s Oratory,

S. Maria in Vallicella combines spectacle with the

miraculous. Look up and one sees an expanse of

(blue) sky. The church-roof, or its remains, threatens

to crash down on one’s head. Only the presence of

the Virgin and some strong-armed putti prevent

disaster.

Cortona continued creating alterpieces. In

Borromini’s S. Ivo, then in S. Carlo dei Catinari.

In Pope Alexander’s 1661 refurbishment of Castel

Gandolfo’s church to newly-canonised Tommaso

da Villanova, he created The Crucifixion altarpiece.

Working alongside him in the church was Bernini,

as they had done back in S. Bibiana 37 years before.

*Donatella Sparti, Article, 998

**Corinna Ricosoli- from ‘Who telleth a tale of unspeaking

death’, Dublin

12 | December 2021Wanted in Rome


UK NATIONAL SETTLED IN ITALY BEFORE

1 JANUARY 2021?

Make sure your residency in Italy is easily recognised. Request your

new Carta di Soggiorno Elettronica from your local Questura as soon

as possible. And don’t get confused…it isn’t the same thing as your

electronic ID card.

Find out more on gov.uk/livinginitaly


Christmas in Rome

CHRISTMAS CRIBS AND

NATIVITY SCENES IN ROME

ROME HOSTS A RICH DISPLAY OF

CHRISTMAS CRIBS AND NATIVITY SCENES

DURING THE FESTIVE SEASON

Andy Devane

Te best known crib exhibition in Rome, and

perhaps in the world, is 100 Presepi. The 2021

edition of the international display, now in its

46 th year, is being held under the colonnade in St Peter’s

Square from 5 January until 9 January. A firm fixture on

Rome’s Christmas calendar, each year 100 Presepi hosts

some Nativity scenes from across Italy and dozens of other

countries.

In addition to contemporary replicas of traditional 18thcentury

Neapolitan and Sicilian cribs, and 19th-century

Roman mangers, there are modern versions made from

wood, papier-mâché and terracotta, as well as unconventional

materials such as sand, rice and metal. 100 Presepi was

established in Rome in 1976 and took place in Piazza

del Popolo until four years ago. Today it is organised by

the Vatican’s Pontifical Council for the Promotion of the

New Evangelisation. For visiting details see website, www.

presepi.it.

This year’s Nativity scene in St Peter’s Square will feature

30 life-sized figurines dressed in Andean costumes in what

is the Vatican’s first crib to come from the Americas. The

Nativity scene, which was created by five artists from the

Chopcca Nation of indigenous peoples in the Huancavelica

region of Peru, will feature alpacas, vicunas and the

Andean condor, Peru’s national symbol.

Christmas in St Peter's Square

several years ago.

The figurines, made of ceramic, maguey wood and

fibreglass, will be dressed in traditional Chopcca costumes.

Baby Jesus will be represented as a “Hilipuska” child,

reports Vatican News, wrapped in a typical Huancavelica

blanket tied with a “chumpi” or woven belt. The Three

Wise Men will carry traditional food including quinoa and

other indigenous cereals, and they will be accompanied by

llamas draped in the Peruvian flag.

The inauguration ceremony at 17.00 on 10 December will

also see the Vatican switch on the lights on its Christmas

tree, a 28m-high spruce gifted from the northern Trentino

region of Italy. The 113-year-old tree, weighing eight tons,

comes from a sustainable forestry management project in

Andalo whose artisans have handcrafted the 600 wooden

decorations.

A traditional-style crib can be found each year in the

church of off Largo Chigi, in the city centre, which for the

last six decades has housed the work of Italian members

of the global crib-building association Amici del Presepio.

A more unusual manger scene can be found near St Peter’s

on Via dei Cavalleggeri 5. The street cleaner’s crib, owned

and cared for by Rome’s refuse collection company AMA,

has a floor containing over 1,400 different stones brought

by pilgrims from all over the world. For details about

visiting the presepe dei netturbini see AMA website www.

amaroma.it.

Rome’s Christmas tree, a 25-metre high fir from Trentino,

is located in Piazza Venezia. This year’s tree is dedicated

to the battle against food waste and world hunger by

the Rome-based UN Food and Agriculture Organization

which will place 17 giant gift packages – symbolising

FAO’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals – at the tree’s

base, local media reports. The tree will be illuminated

at 17.30 on 8 December, on the religious feast of the

Immaculate Conception, with the lights along the city’s

main thoroughfare, Via del Corso, switched on at the same

time.

14 | December 2021Wanted in Rome


Italy's first

AP School

admissions@aosr.org

www.aosr.org/admissions

The Best of an

American-International

Education


LAGO DI ALBANO

This volcanic crater lake presents visitors with

beautiful views of its clear water and surrounding

forests. The picturesque towns along the shores

serve as popular summer resort areas for Romans,

including Castel Gandolfo, home to the summer

papal palace whose gardens were recently opened

to the public. On the other side of the lake is

Palazzolo, a villa bought by Rome’s Venerable

English College in 1920 and now open to guests. The

towns surrounding the lake are known for their

restaurants, shops and fruit farms. Swimming,

fishing and boating are among the favourite

activities for visitors, and the lake’s beach is located

on the western shore. A simple 45-minute train ride

from Termini, visitors can reach Lago Albano by

taking the FL4 train towards Albano Laziale and

getting off at the Castel Gandolfo stop.

around

rome

LAGO DI NEMI

Lago di Nemi is a small and unique volcanic lake

where divers in the 19th century discovered two

large ships built for the notorious Roman emperor

Caligula at the bottom of the lake, filled withbottom

of the lake, filled with artworks and treasures.

Replicas of the ships along with other artefacts are

on display at the nearby Museum of Roman Ships.

Travellers can also visit the natural caves around the

lake, which were a favourite haunt of 19th-century

foreign artists such as Turner. Nemi is associated

with the cult of the Roman goddess Diana, and, for

the last 80 years, an annual strawberry festival.

Visitors can reach the lake by taking the SS7 Appia

southbound as far as Genzano, and then following

signs for Nemi.

LAGO DI VICO

Formed by the volcanic activity of Mount Venus,

Lago di Vico offers a unique geological backdrop

set amid lush woodland and hills. The surrounding

nature reserve is a haven for wildlife, but what is

most characteristic of the area are the hazel and

chestnut plantations. Lakeside campsites and hotels

offer swimming, sailing and horse riding. The two

towns worth a visit are Ronciglione and Caprarola

with its magnificent and recently restored Villa

Farnese. Lago di Vico is a 90-minute drive from

Rome taking the SS2 Cassia, and turning north at

Sutri.

LAGO DI BOLSENA

Located on the site of the Vulsini volcano, dormant

since about 100 BC, this crater lake has two islands

and is surrounded by rolling hills and vegetation. The

area around Montefisascone on the southeast shore

of the lake is famous for its Est! Est!! Est!!! wine. The

town of Bolsena in the northeast is a popular tourist

resort in summer and it is here that the famous

so-called Eucharistic Miracle took place in 1263

when a Bohemian priest is said to have seen blood

coming from the host that he had just consecrated

at Mass. Capodimonte on the southwest of the lake

is also worth a visit. The lakeside area provides

activities for sports and nature enthusiasts all year

round. The best way to reach Lago di Bolsena from

Rome is by car, as buses to Bolsena from Termini

Station are infrequent.

LAGO DI BRACCIANO

Just north-west of Rome along the Via Cassia, Lake

Bracciano is one of the most easily accessible lakes

for Romans. The ban on motor boats (except for a

little ferry) means it remains an ideal spot for

swimming, sailing and canoeing. The Lega Navale

operates a dinghy sailing school in Anguillara.

Churches and historic sites are located in the three

small towns around the lake: Bracciano, Trevignano

and Anguillara. There are also places for camping

and horse riding tours by the lake, which is just an

hour on the Viterbo train line from Rome’s Ostiense

station. The lake is overlooked by the 15th-century

Orsini-Odescalchi castle in Bracciano, often chosen

as the venue for jet-set weddings, and there is also

an air force museum at nearby Vigna di Valle.

LAGO DI MARTIGNANO

This tiny volcanic lake just to the east of Lake

Bracciano offers clean water and beaches with

scenic views of the surrounding meadows and

wildlife. Lago di Martignano is known for its outdoor

activities such as horse riding, hiking, mountain

biking and swimming. Umbrellas, loungers and

luggage storage are available to rent along with

canoes, sailboats and windsurfing equipment. It is

also known for the hot sulphurous springs surrounding

the lake. Arriving at Lago di Martignano by car

is the easiest option. Reaching the lake by public

transport involves taking the FM3 train to Cesano

and opting for either a local bus or taxi.

16 | December 2021Wanted in Rome


IB WORLD SCHOOL

A rewarding international

education. Ages 2 to 18.

Request information!

+39 06 84482 651

romeinternationalschool.it

Wanted in Rome • December 2021 | 17


ARTandSEEK

Please note that not all of these activites

English-language are currently open, cultural due workshops to the and covid-19 visits to

museums

crisis. It

and

is

exhibitions

advisable

for

to

children

check

in

websites

Rome. For

event details tel. 3315524440, email artandseekforkids@gmail.com,

or see website, www.artandse-

for visiting details and make reservation

ekforkids.com.

before going.

Bioparco

Rome's Bioparco has over 1,000 animals and offers

special activities for children and their families at

weekends and during the summer. When little legs

get tired, take a ride around the zoo on an electric

train. Open daily. Viale del Giardino Zoologico 20

(Villa Borghese), tel. 063608211, www.bioparco.it.

Bowling Silvestri

This sports club has an 18-hole mini golf course,

with good facilities for children aged 4 and over,

adults and disabled children.

There are also tennis courts, a table tennis room and

a pizzeria. Via G. Zoega 6 (Monteverde/Bravetta),

tel. 0666158206, www.bowlingsilvestri.com.

Casa del Parco

Eco-friendly workshops, in Italian, in which kids

can learn about nature and how to care for the

environment. Located in the Valle dei Casali nature

park. Via del Casaletto 400, tel. 3475540409,

www.valledeicasali.com.

Casina di Raffaello

Play centre in Villa Borghese offering a programme

of animated lectures, creative workshops, cultural

projects and educational activities for children from

the age of three. Tues-Fri 14.30, Sat-Sun 11.00 and

17.00. Viale della Casina di Raffaello (Porta Pinciana),

tel. 060608, www.casinadiraffaello.it.

18 | December 2021Wanted in Rome


Cinecittà World

This 25-hectare theme park dedicated to the magic

of cinema features high-tech attractions, real and

virtual roller coasters, aquatic shows such as Super

Splash, giant elephant rides and attractions with

cinematic special effects. Located about 10 km from

EUR, south of Rome. Via di Castel Romano, S.S.

148 Pontina, www.cinecittaworld.it.

Climbing

Associazione Sportiva Climbing Side. Basic and

competitive climbing courses for 6-18 year olds.

Tues, Thurs. Via Cristoforo Colombo 1800 (Torrino/Mostacciano),

tel. 3356525473.

Explora

The 2,000-sqm Children’s Museum organises

creative workshops for small children in addition to

holding regular animated lectures, games and

meetings with authors of children’s books. Via

Flaminia 80/86, tel. 063613776, www.mdbr.it.

Go-karting

Club Kartroma is a circuit with go-karts for

children over 9 and two-seater karts for an adult

and a child under 8. Closed Mon. For details see

website. Via della Muratella (Ponte Galeria), tel.

0665004962, www.kartroma.it.

Gymboree

This children's centre caters to little people aged

from 0-5 years, offering Play and Learn activities,

music, art, baby play, school skills and even English

theatre arts. Gymboree @ Chiostro del Bramante

(Piazza Navona), Via Arco della Pace 5, www.gymbo.it.

Hortis Urbis

Association providing hands-on horticultural

workshops for children, usually in Italian but sometimes

in English, in the Appia Antica park. Weekend

activities include sowing seeds, cultivating plants and

harvesting vegetables. Junior gardeners must be

accompanied by a parent or guardian. Via Appia

Antica 42/50, www.hortusurbis.it.

Il Nido

Based in Testaccio, this association supports

expectant mothers, parents, babies and small

children. It holds regular educational and social

events, many of them in English. Via Marmorata

169 (Testaccio), tel. 0657300707, www.associazioneilnido.it.

Luneur

Located in the southern EUR suburb, Luneur is

Italy’s oldest amusement park. Highlights include

ferris wheel, roller coaster, carousel horses, bamboo

tunnel, maze, giant swing and a Wizard of Oz-style

farm. Aimed at children aged up to 12. Entry fee

€2.50, payable in person or online. Via delle Tre

Fontane 100, www.luneurpark.it.

Rainbow Magicland

The 38 attractions at Rome's biggest theme park are

divided into three categories: brave, everyone, and

kids. Highlights include down-hill rafting, a water

roller coaster through Mayan-style pyramids, and

the Shock launch coaster. Located in Valmonte,

south-east of the capital. Via della Pace, 00038

Valmontone, www.rainbowmagicland.it.

Time Elevator

A virtual reality, multi-sensorial 5-D cinema

experience with a motion-base platform, bringing

the history of Rome to life in an accessible and fun

way. The time-machine's commentary is available

in six languages including English. Daily

11.00-19.30. €12 adults, €9 kids. Via dei SS.

Apostoli 20, tel. 0669921823, www.time-elevator.it.

Zoomarine

This amusement and aquatic park outside Rome

offers performances with dolphins, parrots and

other animals for children of all ages. It is also

possible to rent little play carts. Children under 10

must be accompanied by an adult. Via Casablanca

61, Torvaianica, Pomezia, tel. 0691534, www.zoomarine.it.

Wanted in Rome • December 2021 | 19


Rome’s Rome's reputation as as an an important street art art capital continues to to grow grow with with new new murals murals by important by Italian Italian and

international and international street street artists artists appearing appearing all the all time. the Most time. of Most the works of the are works located are in located the suburbs, in the suburbs, often far often from the far

centre. from the Here centre. is where Here to is find where Rome’s to find main the street main art street projects art and projects murals. and murals around Rome.

Esquilino

Esquilino

Murals Murals by by Alice Alice Pasquini, Gio Gio

Pistone, Nicola Alessandrini,

Diamond. Casa Casa dell’Architettura,

dell'Architettura,

Piazza Mafredo Manfredo Fanti Fanti 47. 47.

Marconi

Marconi

The M.A.G.R. (Museo Abusivo

The M.A.G.R. (Museo Abusivo

Gestito dai Rom), a project by French

Gestito dai Rom), a project by French

street street artist artist Seth Seth is located is located in a former in a

former soap factory soap factory on Via on Antonio Via Antonio Avoga-

Avogadro, opposite opposite Ostiense's Ostiense’s landmark

landmark Gasometro. Gasometro. For For details see see

www.999contemporary.com.

Museo dell’Altro e dell’Altrove di

Museo dell’Altro e dell’Altrove di

Metropoliz

Metropoliz

This

This

former

former

meat

meat

factory

factory

in

in

the

the

outskirts of of Rome is is now now a a street street art

art museum as as well as being home to to

some 200 squatting squatters, migrants. many of The them

Museo migrants. dell’Altro The Museo e dell’Altrove di e

Metropoliz, dell’Altrove or di MAAM, Metropoliz, is only or MAAM, open

on

is

Saturdays,

only open

and

on

features

Saturdays,

the work

and

features the work of more than 300

of more than 300 artists including

artists including Edoardo Kobra, Gio

Edoardo

Pistone, Sten&Lex

Kobra,

and

Gio

Diamond.

Pistone,

See

Sten&Lex, MAAM Facebook Pablo Echaurren page for details. and

Borondo. Via Prenestina See MAAM 913. Facebook page

for details. Via Prenestina 913.

Ostiense

Fronte Del Del Porto Porto by by Blu. Blu. Via Via del Porto del

Fluviale.

Porto Fluviale.

Fish’n'Kids by Agostino Iacurci. Via

Fish’n’Kids by Agostino Iacurci. Via

del Porto Fluviale.

del Wall Porto of Fluviale. Fame by JB Rock. Via dei

Wall Magazzini of Fame Generali. by JB Rock. Via dei

Magazzini Shelley by Generali. Ozmo. Ostiense underpass,

Shelley Via Ostiense. by Ozmo. Ostiense

underpass, Palazzo occupato Via Ostiense. by Blu, Via Ostiense.

Palazzo occupato by Blu, Via

Pigneto

Ostiense.

Tributes to Pier Paolo Pasolini by

Pigneto

Maupal, Mr. Klevra and Omino 71.

Tributes to Pier Paolo Pasolini by

Maupal, Mr. Klevra and Omino 71.

Via

Via

Fanfulla

Fanfulla

da

da

Lodi.

Lodi.

2501 mural on Via Fortebraccio.

Blu Landscape by Sten & Lex. Via

Francesco Baracca.

Prati

Prati

Anna Magnani portrait by Diavù.

Anna Magnani portrait by Diavù. Nuovo

Nuovo Mercato Trionfale, Via

Mercato Trionfale, Via Andrea Doria.

Andrea Daniza the Doria. bear by Daniza ROA. Via the Sabotino. bear by

ROA. Via Sabotino.

Primavalle

The Roadkill by Fintan Magee. Via

Cristoforo

Cristoforo Numai.

Numai.

Theseus stabbing the Minotaur by

Theseus stabbing the Minotaur by

Pixelpancho. Via Pietro Bembo.

Pixelpancho. Via Pietro Bembo.

Quadraro

Tunnel murals by by Mr Mr THOMS and and Gio

Gio Pistone. Pistone. Via Decio Via Decio Mure. Mure.

Nido

Nido di

di

Vespe

Vespe

by

by

Lucamaleonte.

Lucamaleonte.

Via

Via

del

Monte del Grano.

del Monte del Grano.

Baby Hulk by Ron English. Via dei

Baby Pisoni Hulk 89. by Ron English. Via dei

Pisoni 89.

Rebibbia

Murals by Blu. Via Via Ciciliano and Via

Palombini (Casal dè dè Pazzi). Pazzi).

Welcome to Rebibbia by Zerocalcare.

Welcome to Rebibbia by Zerocalcare.

Metro B station.

Metro B station.

S. S. Basilio

SanBa features large-scale works on

the façades of social-housing blocks in

in the the disadvantaged disadvantaged north-east north-east suburb of

S. Basilio near Rebibbia. The regeneration

project includes works by Italian

suburb of S. Basilio near Rebibbia.

The

artists

regeneration

Agostino Iacurci,

project

Hitnes

includes

and Blu

works alongside by Spain's Italian Liqen. artists Via Agostino Maiolati,

Iacurci, Via Osimo, Hitnes Via Recanati, and Blu Via alongside Arcevia,

Spain’s Via Treia. Liqen. Via Maiolati, Via

Osimo, Via Recanati, Via Arcevia,

S. Giovanni

Via Treia.

Totti mural by Lucamaleonte. Via

S. Giovanni

Apulia corner of Via Farsalo.

Totti mural by Lucamaleonte. Via

Apulia corner of Via Farsalo.

It’s

It’s a

New

New

Day

Day

by

by

Alice

Alice

Pasquini.

Pasquini.

Via

Anton Via Anton Ludovico. Ludovico.

S. Lorenzo

S. Alice Lorenzo Pasquini. Via dei Sabelli.

Alice Feminicide Pasquini. Via mural dei Sabelli. by Elisa

Feminicide mural by Elisa Caracciolo.

Caracciolo. Via Dei Sardi.

Via Dei Sardi.

Borondo. Via dei Volsci 159.

Borondo. Via dei Volsci 159.

Mural by by Agostino Agostino Iacurci Iacurci on the on

Istituto the Istituto Superiore Superiore di Vittorio di Lattanzio, Vittorio

Via Lattanzio, Aquilonia. Via Aquilonia.

S. Pietro

S.

Uma

Pietro

Cabra by Bordalo II. Stazione

Uma Cabra by Bordalo II. Stazione di S.

di S. Pietro, Clivo di Monte del

Pietro, Clivo di Monte del Gallo.

Gallo.

Testaccio

Hunted Wolf by by ROA. Via Via Galvani.

#KindComments by by Alice Alice Pasquini, Pasquini, Via

Volta,

Via Volta,

Testaccio

Testaccio

market.

market.

Tor Pignattara

Tor Pignattara

Dulk. Dulk. Via Via Antonio Antonio Tempesta. Tempesta.

Etnik. Via Via Bartolomeo Perestrello Perestrello 51.

Coffee 51. Coffee Break by Break Etam by Cru. Etam Via Ludovico Cru. Via

Pavoni. Ludovico Pavoni.

Tom Tom Sawyer Sawyer by Jef by Aerosol. Jef Aerosol. Via Gabrio Via

Serbelloni.

Gabrio Serbelloni.

Pasolini by Diavù. Former Cinema

Impero,

Pasolini

Via

by

Acqua

Diavù.

Bullicante.

Former Cinema

Hostia Impero, by Via Nicola Acqua Verlato. Bullicante. Via Galeazzo

Alessi. Hostia by Nicola Verlato. Via

Herakut. Galeazzo Via Alessi. Capua 14.

Agostino Herakut. Iacurci. Via Capua Via Muzio 14. Oddi 6.

Agostino Iacurci. Via Muzio Oddi 6.

Tor Marancia

The

Tor

Big

Marancia

City Life scheme features 14-m

tall The murals Big City by 22 Life Italian scheme and features international

14-m tall street murals artists by 22 including Italian and Mr

Klevra, international Seth, Gaia street and artists Jerico. including The idea

was Mr Klevra, to transform Seth, the Gaia area's and blocks Jerico. of

flats into an open-air art museum. Via

The idea was to transform the area’s

Tor Marancia. www.bigcity.life.it.

blocks of flats into an open-air art

museum. Via Tor Marancia. For full

details see website, www.bigcity.life.it.

20 | December 2021Wanted in Rome


Clockwise from top left: S. Maria di Shanghai by Mr Klevra (Big City Life), Nido di Vespe by Lucamaleonte, El Devinir by Liqen,

Fish'n'Kids by Agostino Iacurci, MAGR by Seth.

Clockwise from top left: S. Maria di Shanghai by Mr Klevra (Big City Life), Nido di Vespe by Lucamaleonte, El Devinir by Liqen,

Fish'n'Kids by Agostino Iacurci, MAGR by Seth.

Wanted in Rome • December 2021 | 21


ROME'S MAJOR

MUSEUMS

PLEASE NOTE THAT NOT ALL OF THESE MUSEUMS ARE CURRENTLY OPEN, DUE TO THE COVID-19 CRISIS. IT IS ADVISABLE TO

CHECK WEBSITES FOR VISITING DETAILS AND MAKE RESERVATION BEFORE GOING.

VATICAN MUSEUMS

Viale del Vaticano, tel. 0669883860, www.museivaticani.va.

Not only the Sistine Chapel but also the Egyptian and

Etruscan collections and the Pinacoteca. Mon-Sat 09.00-18.00.

Sun (and bank holidays) closed except last Sun of month (free

entry, 08.30-12.30). All times refer to last entry. For group tours

of the museums and Vatican gardens tel. 0669884667. For

private tours (museum only) tel. 0669884947. Closed 26

December and 6 January, Easter Sunday and Monday.

Advance booking online: www.biglietteriamusei.vatican.va.

Patrons of the Arts in the Vatican Museums

Tel. 0669881814, www.vatican-patrons.org. For private

behind-the-scenes tours in the Vatican Museums.

STATE MUSEUMS

Baths of Diocletian

Viale Enrico de Nicola 78, tel. 0639967700, www.archeoroma.beniculturali.it.

Part of the protohistorical section of the

Museo Nazionale Romano in the Baths of Diocletian plus the

restored cloister by Michelangelo. 09.00-19.45. Mon closed.

Borghese Museum

Piazzale Scipione Borghese (Villa Borghese), tel. 06328101,

www.galleria.borghese.it. Sculptures by Bernini and Canova,

paintings by Titian, Caravaggio, Raphael, Correggio.

09.00-19.30. Mon closed. Entry times at 09.00, 11.00, 13.00

15.00, 17.00. Guided tours in English and Italian.

Castel S. Angelo Museum

Lungotevere Castello 50, tel. 066819111, www.castelsantangelo.com.

Emperor Hadrian’s mausoleum used by the popes

as a fortress, prison and palace. 09.00-19.00. Mon closed.

Colosseum, Roman forum and Palatine

Colosseum: Piazza del Colosseo. Palatine: entrances at Piazza

di S. Maria Nova 53 and Via di S. Gregorio 30.

Roman Forum: entrances at Largo Romolo e Remo 5-6 and

Piazza di S. Maria Nova 53, tel. 0639967700, www.colosseo-roma.it.

08.30-19.15. Single ticket gives entry to the

Colosseum and the Palatine (including the Museo Palatino;

last entry one hour before closing). Guided tours in English

and Italian.

Crypta Balbi

Via delle Botteghe Oscure 31, tel.0639967700, www.archeologia.beniculturali.it.

Museum dedicated to the Middle Ages

on the site of the ancient ruins of the Roman Theatre of

Balbus. 09.00-19.00. Mon closed. Guided tours in Italian.

Etruscan Museum at Villa Giulia

Piazza Villa Giulia 9, tel. 063226571, www.villagiulia.beniculturali.it.

National museum of Etruscan civilisation. 08.30-

19.30. Mon closed.

Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna

Viale delle Belle Arti 131, tel. 06322981, 08.30- 19.30. Italy's

modern art collection. Mon closed.

MAXXI

Via Guido Reni 6, tel. 063210181, www. fondazionemaxxi.it.

National Museum of 21st-century art, designed by Zaha Hadid.

Tues-Sun 11.00-19.00, Thurs and Sat 11.00-22.00. Mon closed.

Palazzo Corsini

Via della Lungara, 10, tel. 0668802323, www.barberinicorsini.org.

National collection of ancient art, begun by Rome’s

Corsini family. 08.30- 19.30. Tues closed.

Museo Nazionale d’Arte Orientale

Italy's museum of oriental art. Piazza Guglielmo Marconi 14

(EUR). For details see website, www.pigorini.beniculturali.it.

Palazzo Altemps

Piazza S. Apollinare 46, tel. 0639967700,

www.archeoroma.beniculturali.it. Ancient sculpture from the

Museo Nazionale Romano, including the Ludovisi collection.

09.00-19.45. Mon closed.

Palazzo Barberini

Via delle Quattro Fontane 13, tel. 064824184, www.barberinicorsini.org.

National collection of 13th- to 16th-century

paintings. 08.30- 19.30. Mon closed.

Palazzo Massimo alle Terme

Largo di Villa Peretti 1, tel. 0639967700, www.archeoroma.beniculturali.it.

Important Roman paintings, mosaics, sculpture,

coins and antiquities from the Museo Nazionale Romano,

including the Kircherian collection. 09.00- 19.45. Mon closed.

22 | December 2021Wanted in Rome


Villa Farnesina

Via della Lungara 230, tel. 0668027268, www.villafarnesina.it. A

16th-century Renaissance villa with important frescoes by

Raphael. Mon-Sat 9.00-14.00 excluding holidays.

CITY MUSEUMS

Centrale Montemartini

Via Ostiense 106, tel. 060608, www.centralemontemartini.org.

Over 400 pieces of ancient sculpture from the Capitoline

Museums are on show in a former power plant.

09.00-19.00. Mon closed. Guided tours in English for groups if

reserved in advance.

Capitoline Museums

Piazza del Campidoglio, tel. 060608, www.museicapitolini.org.

The city’s collection of ancient sculpture in Palazzo

Nuovo and Palazzo dei Conservatori, plus the Tabularium and

the Pinacoteca. 09.00-20.00. Mon closed. Guided tours for

groups in English and Italian on Sat and Sun.

Galleria Comunale d’Arte Moderna

Via Francesco Crispi 24, tel. 060608, www.museiincomuneroma.it.

The municipal modern art collection. 10.00- 18.00. Mon closed.

MACRO Asilo

Via Nizza 138, tel. 060608, www.museomacro.it. Programme of

free art events at the city’s contemporary art space until the end

of 2019. 10.30-19.00. Mon closed.

MATTATOIO

Piazza Orazio Giustiniani 4, tel. 060608. www.museomacro.org.

Open for temporary exhibitions 14.00-20.00. Mon closed.

Museo Barracco

Corso Vittorio Emanuele II 166, tel. 0668806848, www.mdbr.it. A

collection of mainly pre-Roman sculpture. 09.00- 19.00. Mon closed.

Museo di Roma – Palazzo Braschi

Via S. Pantaleo 10, tel. 060608, en.museodiroma.it. The city’s

collection of paintings, etchings, photographs, furniture and

clothes from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. 09.00-19.00.

Mon closed. Guided tours in English and Italian on prior

booking tel. 0682059127.

Museo dei Fori Imperiali and Trajan’s Markets

Via IV Novembre 94, tel. 060608, en.mercatiditraiano.it. Museum

dedicated to the forums of Caesar, Augustus, Nerva and Trajan and

the Temple of Peace. 09.00-19.00. Mon closed.

Museo Canonica

Viale P. Canonica 2 (Villa Borghese), tel. 060608, www.museocanonica.it.

The collection, private apartment and studio of the

sculptor and musician Pietro Canonica who died in 1959.

09.00-19.00. Mon closed. Guided tours in Italian and English

(book ten days in advance).

Museo Napoleonico

Piazza di Ponte Umberto 1, tel. 060608, www.museonapoleonico.it.

Paintings, sculptures and jewellery related to Napoleon

and the Bonaparte family. 09.00- 19.00. Mon closed.

Guided tours in Italian and English.

PRIVATE MUSEUMS

Casa di Goethe

Via del Corso 18, tel. 0632650412, www. casadigoethe.it.

Museum dedicated to Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. 10.00-

18.00. Mon closed.

Chiostro Del Bramante

Bramante’s Renaissance building near Piazza Navona stages

exhibitions by important Italian and international artists.

Arco della Pace 5, tel. 0668809035

www.chiostrodelbramante.it.

Doria Pamphilj Gallery

Palazzo Doria Pamphilj, Via del Corso 305, tel. 066797323,

www.doriapamphilj.it. Residence of the Doria Pamphilj family, it

contains the family’s private art collection, which includes a

portrait by Velasquez, a sculpture by Bernini, plus works by

Raphael, Titian, Tintoretto and Caravaggio. 09.00-19.00.

Galleria Colonna

Palazzo Colonna, Via della Pilotta 17, tel. 066784350, www.galleriacolonna.it.

Private collection of works by Veronese, Guido

Reni, Pietro di Cortona and Annibale Caracci. Sat 09.00-13.00

only. Private group tours are available seven days a week on

request. For wheelchair access contact the gallery to arrange

alternative entrance.

Giorgio de Chirico House Museum

Piazza di Spagna 31, tel. 066796546, www.fondazionedechirico.org.

Museum dedicated to the Metaphysical painter Giorgio

de Chirico. Tues-Sat, first Sun of month, 10.00, 11.00, 12.00.

Guided tours in English, advance booking.

Keats-Shelley House

Piazza di Spagna 26, tel. 066784235, www. keats-shelley-house.it.

Museum dedicated to the lives of three English Romantic

poets – John Keats, Percy Bysshe Shelley and Lord Byron.

Mon-Sat 10.00-13.00, 14.00-18.00.

Guided tours on prior booking.

Museo storico della Liberazione

Via Tasso 145, tel. 067003866, www.museoliberazione.it.

Housed in the city's former SS prison, the Liberation Museum

were tortured here during the Nazi occupation of Rome from

1943-1944. 09.00-13.15 / 14.15-20.00.

Palazzo Merulana

Via Merulana 121, tel. 0639967800, www.palazzomerulana.it.

Museum hosting the early 20th-century Italian art collection,

including Scuola Romana paintings, of the Cerasi Foundation.

09.00-20.00. Tues closed.

Wanted in Rome • December 2021 | 23


PLEASE NOTE THAT NOT ALL OF

THESE GALLERIES ARE CURRENTLY

OPEN, DUE TO THE COVID-19 CRISIS.

IT IS ADVISABLE TO CHECK

WEBSITES FOR VISITING DETAILS

AND TO MAKE RESERVATION

BEFORE GOING.

ROME’S MOST ACTIVE AND CONTEMPORARY

ART GALLERIES

1/9 Unosunove

1/9 Unosunove focuses on emerging national and international

contemporary artists and explores various media

including paintings, sculpture and photography. Via degli

Specchi 20, tel. 0697613696, www.unosunove.com.

A.A.M. Architettura

Arte Moderna Gallery housing numerous works of contemporary

design, photography, drawings and architecture

projects. Via dei Banchi Vecchi 61, tel. 0668307537,

www.ff-maam.it.

Contemporary Cluster

Visual art, design, architecture, fashion design and beauty

apothecary in a 17th-century palace. Via dei Barbieri 7, tel.

0668805928, www.contemporarycluster.com.

C.R.E.T.A.

Cultural association promoting ceramics and the visual,

humanistic, musical and culinary arts through workshops,

exhibitions and artist residencies. Palazzo Delfini, Via dei

Delfini 17, tel. 0689827701, www.cretarome.com.

Dorothy Circus Gallery

Prominent gallery specialising in international pop-surrealist

art. Via dei Pettinari 76, tel. 0668805928, www.dorothycircusgallery.com.

Ex Elettrofonica

This architecturally unique contemporary art gallery promotes

and supports the work of young international artists. Vicolo S.

Onofrio 10-11, tel. 0664760163, www.exelettrofonica.com.

Fondazione Memmo

Contemporary art space that hosts established foreign artists

for sitespecific exhibitions. Via Fontanella Borghese 56b, tel.

0668136598, www.fondazionememmo.it.

Fondazione Pastificio Cerere

This non-profit foundation develops and promotes

educational projects and residencies for young artists and

curators, as well as a programme of exhibitions, lectures,

workshops and studio visits. Via degli Ausoni 7, tel.

0645422960, www.pastificiocerere.com.

Fondazione Volume!

The Volume Foundation exhibits works created specifically

for the gallery with the goal of fusing art and landscape. Via

di S. Francesco di Sales 86-88, tel. 06 6892431, www.fondazionevolume.com.

24 | December 2021Wanted in Rome

Franz Paludetto

Gallery in S. Lorenzo that promotes the work of Italian and

international contemporary artists. Via degli Ausoni 18,

www.franzpaludetto.com.

Frutta

This contemporary art gallery supports international and

local artists in its unique space. Via dei Salumi 53 tel.

0645508934, www.fruttagallery.com.

Gagosian Gallery

The Rome branch of this international contemporary art

gallery hosts some of the biggest names in modern art. Via

Francesco Crispi 16, tel.0642086498, www.gagosian.com.

GALLA

Exhibition space designed to showcase original, unconventional

art works at affordable prices by artists working in

various fields. Via degli Zingari 28, tel. 3476552515,

www.facebook.com/GALLAmonti.

Galleria Alessandro Bonomo

Gallery showing the works of important Italian and international

visual artists. Via del Gesù 62, tel. 0669925858,

www.bonomogallery.com.

Galleria Valentina Bonomo

Located in a former convent, this gallery hosts both internationally

recognised and emerging artists who create works

specifically for the gallery space. Via del Portico d’Ottavia 13,

tel. 066832766, www.galleriabonomo.com.

Galleria Frammenti D’Arte

Gallery promoting painting, design and photography by

emerging and established Italian and international artists.

Via Paola 23, tel. 069357144142, www.fdaproject.com.

Galleria Lorcan O’Neill

High-profile international artists regularly exhibit at this

gallery located near Campo de’ Fiori. Vicolo Dè Catinari 3, tel.

0668892980, www.lorcanoneill.com.

Galleria della Tartaruga

Well-established gallery that has promoted important Italian

and foreign artists since 1975. Via Sistina 85/A, tel.

066788956, www.galleriadellatartaruga.com.

Galleria Il Segno

Prestigious gallery showing work by major Italia and international

artists since 1957. Via Capo le Case 4, tel. 066791387,

www.galleriailsegno.com.


Wanted in Rome • December 2021 | 25


MAXXI

amazes you,

always art

architecture

design

photography

cinema

26 | December 2021Wanted in Rome


Galleria Mucciaccia

Gallery near Piazza del Popolo promoting established

contemporary artists and emerging talents. Largo Fontanella

Borghese 89, tel. 0669923801, www.galleriamucciaccia.com.

Galleria Russo

This historic gallery holds group and solo exhibitions

showcasing the work of major 20th-century Italian painters

alongside promising new Italian artists. Via Alibert 20, tel.

066789949, www.galleriarusso.it.

Galleria Varsi

A dynamic gallery near Campo de’ Fiori, known for its stable

of street artists. Via di Grotta Pinta 38, tel. 066865415,

www.galleriavarsi.it.

Gavin Brown's Enterprise

New York gallerist Gavin Brown shows the work of international

artists at his Trastevere gallery in a deconsecrated church

dating to the eighth century. S. Andrea de Scaphis, Via dei

Vascellari 69, www.gavinbrown.biz.

Il Ponte Contemporanea

Hosts exhibitions representing the international scene and

contemporary artists of different generations. Via Giuseppe

Acerbi 31A, tel. 0653098768, www.ilpontecontemporanea.com.

La Nuova Pesa

Well-established gallery showing work by prominent Italian

artists. Via del Corso 530, tel. 063610892, www.nuovapesa.it.

MAC Maja Arte Contemporanea

Gallery devoted to exhibitions by prominent Italian artists.

Via di Monserrato 30, www.majartecontemporanea.com.

Magazzino d’Arte Moderna

Contemporary art gallery that focuses on young and

emerging artists. Via dei Prefetti 17, tel. 066875951, www.magazzinoartemoderna.com.

Monitor

This contemporary art gallery offers an experimental space for

a new generation of artists. Palazzo Sforza Cesarini, Via Sforza

Cesarini 43 A, t el. 0639378024, www.monitoronline.org.

Nero Gallery

Space dedicated to showcasing young international artists

working in pop surrealism, lowbrow art, dark art, comic art

and surrealism. Via Castruccio Castracane 9, tel. 0627801418,

www.nerogallery.com.

Nomas Foundation

Nomas Foundation promotes contemporary research in art

and experimental exhibitions. Viale Somalia 33, tel.

0686398381, www.nomasfoundation.com.

Operativa Arte Contemporanea

A new space oriented towards younger artists. Via del

Consolato 10, www.operativa-arte.com.

Pian de Giullari

Art studio-gallery in the house of Carlina and Andrea Bottai

showing works by contemporary artists from Rome, Naples

and Florence capable of transmitting empathy and emotions.

Via dei Cappellari 49, tel. 3397254235, 3663988603,

www.piandegiullari2.blogspot.com.

Plus Arte Puls

Cultural association and gallery showing work by important

contemporary Italian and international artists. Viale Mazzini 1,

tel. 3357010795, www.plusartepuls.com.

RvB ARTS

Rome-based gallery specialising in affordable contemporary

art by young, emerging Italian artists. Via delle Zoccolette 28,

tel. 3351633518, www.rvbarts.com.

Sala 1

This internationally known non-profit contemporary art

gallery provides an experimental research centre for contemporary

art, architecture, performance and music. Piazza di

Porta S. Giovanni 10, tel. 067008691, www.salauno.com.

S.T. Foto libreria galleria

Gallery in Borgo Pio representing a diverse range of contemporary

art photography. Via degli Ombrellari 25, tel.

0664760105, www.stsenzatitolo.it.

Studio Sales di Norberto Ruggeri

The gallery exhibits pieces by both Italian and international

contemporary artists particularly minimalist, postmodern

and abstract work. Piazza Dante 2, int. 7/A, tel. 0677591122,

www.galleriasales.it.

T293

The Rome branch of this contemporary art gallery presents

national and international artists and hosts multiple solo

exhibitions. Via G. M. Crescimbeni 11, tel. 0688980475,

www.t293.it.

The Gallery Apart

This contemporary art gallery supports young artists in their

research and assists them in their projects to help them

emerge into the international art world. Via Francesco Negri

43, tel. 0668809863, www.thegalleryapart.it.

TraleVolte

Contemporary art gallery focusing on the relationship

between art and architecture, hosting solo and group shows

of Italian and international artists. Piazza di Porta S. Giovanni

10, tel. 0670491663, www.tralevolte.org.

White Noise Gallery

Based in the S. Lorenzo district, this gallery exhibits unconventional

work by young Italian and international artists. Via

della Seggiola 9, tel. 066832833, www.whitenoisegallery.it.

Wunderkammern

This gallery promotes innovative research of contemporary

art. Via Gabrio Serbelloni 124, tel. 0645435662, www.wunderkammern.net.

Z20 Galleria Sara Zanin

Started by art historian Sara Zanin, Z2o Galleria offers a range

of innovative national and international contemporary artists.

Via della Vetrina 21, tel. 0670452261, www.z2ogalleria.it.

Wanted in Rome • December 2021 | 27


where to go in Rome

WHAT’S ON

Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Moderna dedicates an exhibition to Antonietta Raphaël, Wanted in see Rome page • 30. December 2021 | 29


EXHIBITIONS

From 6 December museums

and archaeological sites in

Rome are open only to visitors

who show proof that they have

been vaccinated or recovered

in the last six months from

covid-19, under Italy's new socalled

Super Green Pass system.

Access will no longer be given

to those who provide a negative

covid test alone (as per the

“basic” Green Pass system which

changes after 5 December).

Most venues require advance

booking and the wearing of

masks is obligatory. Weekend

visits to the more popular sites

such as the Colosseum and

the Pantheon must be booked

at least one day ahead. For

visiting details check websites

in advance.

100 PRESEPI

5 DEC-9 JAN

This year’s edition of 100 Presepi,

Rome’s international Nativity crib

exhibition, takes place under the

colonnade of St Peter’s Square. A

firm fixture on Rome’s Christmas

calendar, each year 100 Presepi hosts

some Nativity scenes from across

Italy and dozens of other countries.

In addition to contemporary

replicas of traditional 18th-century

Neapolitan and Sicilian cribs, and

100 Presepi at St Peter's Square.

Caravaggio and Artemisia exhibition at Palazzo Barberini.

19th-century Roman mangers, there

are modern versions made from

wood, papier-mâché and terracotta,

as well as unconventional materials

such as sand, rice and metal. Now

in its 46th year, 100 Presepi was

established in Rome in 1976 and

took place in Piazza del Popolo until

four years ago. Today it is organised

by the Vatican’s Pontifical Council

for the Promotion of the New

Evangelisation. For visiting details

see website, www.100presepi.it.

CARAVAGGIO AND ARTEMISIA

26 NOV-27 MARCH

Caravaggio and Artemisia: Judith’s

challenge. Violence and seduction in

painting between the 16th and 17th

centuries is the title of a new exhibition

at Palazzo Barberini. The show

takes as it starting point Judith who

decapitates Holofernes in Caravaggio’s

masterpiece which was rediscovered

70 years ago before being acquired

by the Italian state. Evaluating the

impact the powerful painting has had

on the art world over the centuries,

the exhibition comprises 31 works,

mostly large format, from important

national and international institutions,

including the Prado and the Thyssen

Museum in Madrid, the Capodimonte

Museum in Naples and Rome’s the

Borghese Gallery in Rome. The show

is curated by Maria Cristina Terzaghi

and features works by artists including

Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi,

Valentin de Boulogne, Pietro Novelli,

Mattia Preti and Giuseppe Vermiglio.

Palazzo Barberini, Via delle Quattro

Fontane 13, www.barberinicorsini.org.

ANTONIETTA RAPHAEL

17 NOV-30 JAN

The Galleria Nazionale d’Arte

Moderna (GNAM) presents Through the

Looking Glass, an exhibition dedicated

to Antonietta Raphaël (Kaunas 1895

Rome 1975), the Lithuanian- born

artist who was a leading exponent of

the Scuola Romana movement. The

show comprises paintings, sculptures

and works on paper, accompanied by

documents, family photographs, letters

30 | December 2021Wanted in Rome


and pages from her diaries. Also on

display is a selection of works by artist

Mario Mafai – her lifelong partner –

along with a specially created video

documentary. The gallery says the

exhibition’s title alludes to Raphaël’s

“ability to transform artistic practice

into a tool for investigating her own

inner world and evokes dreamlike

and imaginative dimensions in

which the female figure is the main

protagonist.” Curated by Giorgia Calò

and Alessandra Troncone, the show

is held in collaboration with the

Lithuanian Institute of Culture and

the embassy of Lithuania in Rome.

GNAM, Viale delle Belle Arti 131,

www.lagallerianazionale.com.

KLIMT: LA SECESSIONE E

L’ITALIA

27 OCT-27 MARCH

Palazzo Braschi presents an

exhibition of paintings by Gustav

Klimt, including Portrait of a Lady,

which went missing for almost 23

years after its theft from a gallery in

Piacenza. The painting was stolen

in 1997 before being rediscovered in

the gallery’s garden, in mysterious

circumstances, in 2019. The works

on show feature some of the

Austrian artist’s masterpieces from

the Belvedere Museum in Vienna,

the Klimt Foundation and public

and private collections such as

the Neue Galerie Graz. Highlights

among the paintings, sculptures

and drawings on display include

Judith I, Lady in White, Friends I (The

Klimt exhibition at Palazzo Braschi.

Sebastião-Salgado at MAXXI. Indiana Yawanawá, Stato di Acre, Brasile

2016.©-Sebastião Salgado Contrasto.

Sisters), Amalie Zuckerkandl and The

Bride. The exhibition focuses on the

artist’s relationship with Italy and

the influence he had on other artists

working in the country. Museo di

Roma, Piazza Navona 2, tel. 060608,

www.museodiroma.it.

INFERNO

15 OCT-9 JAN

The Scuderie del Quirinale marks

the 700th anniversary of the death

of Dante Alighieri with an exhibition

based on the first book of The Divine

Comedy. The show comprises more

than 200 artworks on loan from

80 museums, public collections and

private collections from Italy, the

Vatican and across Europe. Inferno

documents hell-related iconography

from the Middle Ages to the present

day, in what is hailed as the first major

art exhibition dedicated to this theme.

Curated by Jean Clair, the show takes

visitors on a journey into the depths

of hell, as imagined by artists through

the centuries, accompanied by the

words of Dante. These visions range

from the tormented and nightmarish

to the romanticised, from Mediaeval

to Baroque, up to psychoanalytic

interpretations from the 20th century.

See review on page 3. Scuderie del

Quirinale, Via XXIV Maggio 16,

www.scuderiequirinale.it.

SEBASTIAO SALGADO

1 OCT-13 FEB

Photojournalist Sebastião Salgado

provides a black and white

photographic journey through the

Brazilian Amazon, after he spent six

years capturing images of the forest,

the rivers, the mountains and the

people who live there. MAXXI, Italy’s

national museum of 21st-century arts,

presents Salgado’s 200 photographs

against a soundscape of sounds -

recorded in the forests and created

by Jean-Michel Jarre – feauring the

rustling of trees, birdsong, the shrieks

of animals, and the roar of waterfalls.

The exhibition highlights the fragility

of this ecosystem, showing that in the

protected areas where the indigenous

communities live the forest has

suffered almost no damage. MAXXI,

Via Guido Reni 4A, www.maxxi.art.

ALL ABOUT BANKSY:

EXHIBITION 2

5 MAY-9 JAN

Chiostro del Bramante presents

ALL about BANKSY, an exhibition

dedicated to the anonymous

British street artist whose satirical

murals are celebrated around the

world. The show, which follows

an earlier Banksy exhibition,

features about 250 artworks

from private collections. Chiostro

del Bramante, Via Arco della

Pace 5, tel. 0668809035, www.

chiostrodelbramante.it.

Wanted in Rome • December 2021 | 31


ART NEWS

Tear Along the Dotted Line by Zerocalcare.

NETFLIX TOASTS SUCCESS OF ZEROCALCARE

Netflix is celebrating its gamble on Rome cartoonist

Michele Rech, better known as Zerocalcare, whose new

animated mini-series has become Italy’s most watched

show on the streaming platform. The series Tear Along

the Dotted Line (Strappare lungo i bordi in Italian) was

launched in mid-November in 190 countries around

the world, in various languages including English.

Netflix describes the six-part series as “offbeat,

irreverent”, and introduces it like this: “A cartoonist in

Rome with his armadillo-for-a-conscience reflects on his

path in life and a would-be love as he and his friends

travel outside the city.” The episodes, which each last

about 15 minutes, feature anecdotes, reflections and

flashbacks by Zerocalcare who credited Netflix with

giving him “absolute freedom” in the project. “A few

years ago I had the desire to try to tell a story not in

comics but in cartoons” – Zerocalacare said after the

premiere at the recent Rome Film Fest – “because it is

a more direct, more accessible language.”

In addition to writing and directing, Zerocalcare

narrated the animated series in his Roman dialect.

The linguistics have caused problems for some

Italians outside Rome, amid claims the show verges

on incomprehensible at times, leading to much debate

on social media. Zerocalcare, from the Rebibbia

suburb, is not perturbed by the controversy. “For me,

Romanesco is the language of the comfort zone”, he

said at the show’s premiere. “I speak more Romanesco

in interviews than with my mother” – he noted – “not

because I have to flaunt it but because it’s a question of

my identity, it makes me feel entrenched in my fort.”

CASA BALLA TO STAY OPEN IN 2022

Rome celebrates the 150th anniversary of the birth of

the Italian painter and Futurist master Giacomo Balla

by opening his former home to the public for the first

time, after being closed up for 30 years. Casa Balla, the

painter’s kaleidoscopic vision of art and colour on Via

Oslavia, opened in June with visits scheduled to end in

December. However due to popular demand and sellout

tours, it has been decided that Casa Balla is to stay

open to the public throughout 2022.

Born in Turin in 1871, Balla lived and worked in his

extraordinary Roman home from 1929 until his death

in 1958. His daughters Luce and Elica, also painters,

stayed living in the house until the 1990s. The opening

of Casa Balla is thanks to a collaboration between

MAXXI, the National Museum of 21st-Century Arts,

and Rome’s special superintendence of Archaeology,

Fine Arts and Landscape, with the support of the

Italian culture ministry and the Bank of Italy.

Bartolomeo Pietromarchi, MAXXI art director and

curator of the project explains: “The house with

its decorations, furniture, works of art expresses the

artist’s personality in all its forms and represents one

of his greatest masterpieces.” Reservations are required

and can be made via MAXXI website, www.maxxi.it.

See also Inferno review page 3.

Casa Balla, former home of Giacomo Balla, on Via Oslavia 39/B.

SHELLEY IN ROME

The Keat-Shelley House presents a video story called

Shelley in Rome, directed by Giulio Boato and produced by

313 films. The film, premiered on 1 December, provides a

“psychogeographical take” on Percy Bysshe Shelley’s time

in Rome, exploring the poet’s relationship with the city

and Roman locations that inspired his poetry. The video

offers “evocative visuals and three-dimensional audio” and

the narration of the story revolves around Shelley’s three

masterpieces inspired by his time in Rome: Prometheus

Unbound, The Cenci and Adonais, his elegy on the death

of his friend John Keats. For details see the Keats-Shelley

website, www.ksh.roma.it.

Andy Devane

32 | December 2021Wanted in Rome


OPERA

MILAN

MACBETH

BY GIUSEPPE VERDI

7-29 DEC

Verdi’s Macbeth conducted by

Riccardo Chailly opens La Scala’s

new season. The new production

for Milan’s opera house is by

director Davide Livermore. Anna

Netrebko sings Lady Macbeth,

Luca Salsi Macbeth, Francesco Meli

Macduff and Ildar Abdrazakov

as Banquo. Teatro alla Scala,

Via Filodrammatici 2, www.

teatroallascala.org.

I CAPULETTI E I MONTECCHI

BY VINCENZO BELLINI

18 JAN-2 FEB

Evelin Pidò conducts a new

production of Bellini’s version of

Romeo and Juliet, directed by Adrian

Noble, who was the head of the Royal

Shakespeare Company until 2003.

This is Noble’s debut at La Scala.

Marianne Crebassa sings Romeo

and Lisette Oropesa Giulietta. Bellini

composed the opera in 1830 for the

Venice Carnival and given that he

had little over a month to deliver the

composition he used material from

Zaira, his fifth opera which had been

a flop in Parma the previous year.

I Capuletti e i Montecchi became

an immediate success and made

Bellini’s reputation. Teatro alla

Scala, Via Filodrammatici 2, www.

teatroallascala.org.

ROME

ACQUAPROFONDA

3-7 DEC

A new opera with music by

Giovanni Solima and the libretto

by Giancarlo De Cataldo. The

opera, about the pollution of the

sea, is dedicated to young children

and has been commissioned by the

Teatro dell’Opera di Roma and

the Teatro Sociale di Como as part

of the Progetto Opera Domani.

Conducted by Carlo Donadio and

directed by Luis Ernesto Donas.

Piazza Beniamino Gigli, www.

operaroma.it.

TOSCA

BY PUCCINI

4-12 DEC

Alessandro Talevi’s production

of Tosca returns to the Rome

Opera House, conducted by Paolo

Arrivabeni, with Saioa Hernandez

as Tosca, Vittorio Grigolo as

Cavaradossi, Roberto Frontali

as Scarpia. Teatro dell’Opera di

Roma, Piazza Beniamino Gigli,

www.operaroma.it.

KAT’A KABANOVA

BY JANACEK

18-27 JAN

This is the first time that Janacek’s

opera has been performed at

Teatro Costanzi, in a co-production

with the Royal Opera House. It is

conducted by David Robertson and

directed by Richard Jones who has

directed five Royal Opera House

productions and is considered

one of the best British opera and

theatre directors. The opera will

be sung in Czech with Italian

and English surtitles. It tells the

story of a woman living in a small

bigoted community. She is trapped

in a loveless marriage, bullied by

her mother-in-law and spied on by

her neighbours, as she searches for

something better. Teatro dell’Opera

di Roma, Piazza Beniamino Gigli,

www.operaroma.it.

Janacek's Katya Kabanova, performed at the Royal Opera House in 2019, debuts at the Teatro dell'Opera di Roma in January.

34 | December 2021Wanted in Rome


Classical

Lang Lang is back touring after his tendonitis in 2017.

ACCADEMIA FILARMONICA

ROMANA

BICENTENARY CONCERT

4 DEC

Daniele Gatti conducts the Orchestra

Mozart for the Accademia’s 200th

anniversary concert. Music by

Rossini, Stravinsky, Aperchis

(premiere commissioned by the

Filarmonica) and Mozart. Rossini

was an honorary member of the

fledgling academy and Stravinsky

taught at the Filarmonica. Teatro

Olimpico, Piazza Gentile da Fabriano

17, www.filarmonicaromana.org.

FESTA FILARMONICA

8 DEC

The Accademia S. Cecilia and the

Teatro dell’Opera di Roma join

with the Accademia Filarmonica

Romana to mark its 200th

anniversary. Music by Rossini.

Sgambati, Casella, Mendelssohn,

Schubert and Stranvinsky. Teatro

Argentina, Largo Argentina, www.

filarmonicaromana.org.

MUSICA E LETTERTURA

MORPHE, LA FORMA DEL MONDO

10 DEC

Lang Lang is back touring

after his tendonitis in 2017.

Cultural and social change, from

Americanisation to industrialisation.

Sala Casella, Via Flaminia 18. www.

filarmonicaromana.org.

PIETRO DE MARIA

16 DEC

Pianist Pietro de Maria plays music

by Beethoven, Sgambati and Liszt.

Teatro Argentina, Largo Argentina,

www.filarmonicaromana.org.

ASSOLI VI

FRANCESCO GRANATA

19 DEC

The Assoli series of concerts are

dedicated to contemporary music.

This season the opening concert of

the series is dedicated to music by

Fabio Vacchi, performed by pianist

Francesco Granata. Other concerts

in the series will be on 28 Jan, 25

Feb, 1 April, 8 April, 20 May. Sala

Casella, Via Flaminia 18. www.

filarmonicaromana.org.

ACCADEMIA S. CECILIA

LANG LANG IN RECITAL

6 DEC

Lang Lang will play music by

Schumman and Bach’s Goldberg

Variations. The star pianist had

severe tendonitis in 2017 and had

to take a break from his heavy

schedule of concerts. He is back

with performances in Jan, March

and April in Europe and the USA.

His recording of the Goldberg

Variations in 2020 did not get a

good review in The Guardian: “There

are flashes of perfectly weighted,

stylistically appropriate playing, but

too much of Lang’s performances

seems to squeeze all the energy

out of the music, with tempi that

are achingly slow and phrasing that

is so mannered it sometimes seems

more appropriate for Rachmaninov

than Bach.” Auditorium Parco della

Musica, Via P de Coubertin 36,

www.santacecilia.it.

36 | December 2021Wanted in Rome


MARCUS STENZ

ANDREI KOROBEINIKOV

10 DEC

Marcus Stenz conducts the S.

Cecilia Orchestra and pianist Andrei

Korobeinikov performing music by

Debussy, Rachmaninov, Busoni and

Scriabin. Auditorium Parco della

Musica, Via P. de Coubertin 36,

www.santacecilia.it.

FAIRY TALES IN MUSIC 1

16-18 DEC

This series of concerts performs

Tchaikovsky’s Snow Maiden,

conducted by Stanislav Kochanovsky,

with the mezzosoprano Agunda

Kulaeva, tenor Alexander Mikhailov

and narrator Milena Vukotic.

Auditorium Parco della Musica,

Via P. de Coubertin 36, www.

santacecilia.it.

CARUSO 100

22 DEC

To celebrate the 100th anniversary

of the great tenor’s death in Naples.

Music by Donizetti, Gounod, Bizet,

Verdi, Puccini, Leoncavallo, sung

by the tenor Javier Camarena.

Auditorium Parco della Musica,

Via P. de Coubertin 36, www.

santacecilia.it.

INSTITUZIONE

DEI CONCERTI

UNIVERSITARIO

VALENTINA LISITSA

4 DEC

Valentina Lisitsa, who is among

the best known pianists to perform

on YouTube (aka as the Queen of

Rachmaninoff), debuts in Rome

with a programme of music by

Rachmaninoff and Chopin. She has

recently also performed in Palermo.

Aula Magna Sapienza, Piazziale

Aldo Moro, www.concertiiuc.it.

SAINT-SAENS AND FRIENDS

14 DEC

Steven Isserlis violin and pianist

Connie Shih mark the 100th

anniversary of the composer’s

death with two of his violin and

piano concertos, as well as music

by his contemporaries. Aula Magna

Sapienza, Piazziale Aldo Moro,

www.concertiiuc.it.

ZLATOMIR FUNG

18 DEC

Cellist Zlatomir Fung debuts at

the IUC with Richard Fu piano,

performing music by David

Popper, Schubert, Salonen Knock

and Schostakovich. Fung won the

Tchaikovsky Prize in 2019. Aula

Magna Sapienza, Piazziale Aldo

Moro, www.concertiiuc.it.

Valentina Lisitsa is sometimes known as the Queen of Rachmaninoff because of her YouTube success.

Wanted in Rome • December 2021 | 37


DANCE

Giuliano Peparini's sumptuous adaptation of The Nutcracker at the Teatro dell'Opera di Roma.

MILAN

TEATRO ALLA SCALA

LA BAYADERE RUDOLF NUREYEV

15 DEC-8 JAN

This ballet, which Nureyev made his

own, opens the new season at La

Scala, with new sets and costumes

by Luisa Spinatelli. It is a return

to purity of classical ballet with the

whole of La Scala Ballet Company

on stage and the participation of

some of the ballet school’s students.

Kevin Rhodes is conducting. Teatro

alla Scala, Via Filodrammatici 2,

www.teatroallascala.org.

ROME

TEATRO DELL’OPERA DI ROMA

LO SCHIACCIANOCI

19 DEC-2 JAN

This is Guiliano Peparini’s

sumptuous adaptation of the old

Christmas favourite, with dancers

Alessandra Amato, Susanna Salvi,

Claudio Cocino and Alessio Rezza

in the main roles. Teatro dell’Opera

di Roma, Piazza Beniamino Gigli,

www.operadiroma.it.

TEATRO OLIMPICO

LO SCHIACCIANOCI

RUSSIAN CLASSICAL BALLET

5-7 DEC

The Russian Classical Ballet was

formed in Moscow in 2005 to

promote the traditions of classical

Russian ballet. It has chosen to

perform one of the great traditional

Christmas ballets, in classical style.

Teatro Olimpico, Piazza Gentile da

Fabriano, www.teatroolimpico.it.

38 | December 2021Wanted in Rome


A FOOTBALL GAME

UNLIKE ANY OTHER

GET YOUR

TICKETS

MOBILE PHONE

asroma.com/en/ticketing

OR SIMPLY SCAN THIS CODE

WITH YOUR PHONE

ON YOUR

Wanted in Rome • December 2021 | 39


classical

classical

The following is a list of the main musical

associations in Rome but it is not a definitive

list of all the music that is available in the city.

The following is a list of the main musical

There are also concerts in many of the

associations in Rome but it is not a definitive

churches and sometimes in the museums.

list of all the music that is available in the city.

There are also concerts in many of the

Auditorium Conciliazione, Via della

churches and sometimes in the museums.

Conciliazione 4, www.auditoriumconciliazione.it

Auditorium Auditorium Parco della Conciliazione, Musica, Viale Via P. de della

Coubertin Conciliazione 30, www.auditorium.com

4, www.auditoriumconciliazione.it

Accademia Auditorium Filarmonica Parco della Romana, Musica, Viale Teatro P. de

Olimpico, Coubertin Piazza 30, www.auditorium.com

Gentile da Fabriano 17,

www.filarmonicaromana.org. The new season

Accademia Filarmonica Romana, Teatro

starts on 15 Oct

Olimpico, Piazza Gentile da Fabriano 17,

Accademia www.filarmonicaromana.org. S. Cecilia, www.santacecilia.it. The new season All

concerts starts at on Auditorium 15 Oct Parco della Musica. The

new

Accademia

season starts

S.

on 5

Cecilia,

Oct

www.santacecilia.it. All

Istituzione concerts Universitaria at Auditorium Parco dei Concerti, della Musica. Aula The

Magna, new Università season starts la Sapienza, on 5 Oct www.concertiiuc.it

Oratorio Istituzione del Gonfalone, Universitaria Via del dei Gonfalone Concerti, 32a, Aula

www.oratoriogonfalone.com

Magna, Università la Sapienza, www.concertiiuc.it

RomeConcerts, Oratorio del Methodist Gonfalone, Church, Via del Piazza Gonfalone Ponte 32a,

S. Angelo, www.oratoriogonfalone.com

www.romeconcerts.it

Roma RomeConcerts, Sinfonietta, Methodist Auditorium Church, Ennio Morricone, Piazza Ponte

Torvergata, S. Angelo, www.romasinfonietta.com

www.romeconcerts.it

Roma Roma Tre Sinfonietta, Orchestra, some Auditorium concerts Ennio are at Morricone, Teatro

Palladium, Torvergata, Piazza www.romasinfonietta.com

Bartolomeo Romano 8,

teatropalladium.uniroma3.it, Roma Tre Orchestra, some while concerts others are are at Teatro

the Aula Palladium, Magna, Piazza Scuola Lettere Bartolomeo Filosofia Romano Lingue, 8,

Universita teatropalladium.uniroma3.it, Roma Tre, Via while Ostienze others 234, are at

www.r30.org the Aula Magna, Scuola Lettere Filosofia Lingue,

There

Universita

are often

Roma

concerts,

Tre,

festivals

Via Ostienze

and opera

234,

recitals

www.r30.org

in several churches in Rome.

All

There

Saints'

are

Anglican

often concerts,

Church, Via

festivals

Babuino

and

153,

opera

www.allsaintsrome.org

recitals in several churches in Rome.

All Saints' Anglican Church, Via Babuino 153,

Ponte S. Angelo Methodist Church, Ponte S.

www.allsaintsrome.org

Angelo, www.methodistchurchrome.com

Ponte S. Angelo Methodist Church, Ponte S.

Oratorio del Caravita, Via della Caravita 7

Angelo, www.methodistchurchrome.com

St Paul's Oratorio Within del Caravita, the Walls, Via Via della Nazionale Caravita and 7 the

corner of Via Nazionale, www.stpaulsrome.it

St Paul's Within the Walls, Via Nazionale and the

S. Agnese

corner of

in

Via

Agone,

Nazionale,

Sagrestia

www.stpaulsrome.it

del Borromini,

Piazza Navona

S. Agnese in Agone, Sagrestia del Borromini,

Palazzo Piazza Doria NavonaPamphilj hosts a series called

Opera Serenades by Night with Dinner throughout

the year. Palazzo There Doria is a concert, Pamphilj a tour hosts of the a series museum called

and Opera dinner Serenades afterwards. by Night Via with del Dinner Corso throughout 305,

www.doriapamphilj.com

the year. There is a concert, a tour of the museum

and dinner afterwards. Via del Corso 305,

www.doriapamphilj.com

5040 | Oct | December 2018 • Wanted 2021in Wanted Rome in Rome

MUSIC MUSIC

THEATRE

CINEMA

CINEMA

VENUES

MUSIC

THEATRE

CINEMA

DANCE

OPERA

cinema

cinema

The following cinemas show movies in English

or original language, and sometimes foreign

film The festivals. following See cinemas Wanted show in Rome movies website in English for

weekly or original updates. language, and sometimes foreign

film festivals. See Wanted in Rome website for

Adriano,

weekly

Piazza

updates.

Cavour 22, tel. 0636767

Barberini, Piazza Barberini 24-26, tel.

0686391361

Adriano, Piazza Cavour 22, tel. 0636767

Casa

Barberini,

del Cinema,

Piazza

Largo Marcello

Barberini

Mastroianni

24-26,

1,

tel.

tel.

0686391361

06423601, www.casadelcinema.it

Casa del Cinema, Largo Marcello Mastroianni 1,

Cinema dei Piccoli, Viale della Pineta 15, tel.

tel. 06423601, www.casadelcinema.it

068553485

Cinema dei Piccoli, Viale della Pineta 15, tel.

Farnese Persol, Piazza Campo de’ Fiori 56, tel.

068553485

066864395, www.cinemafarnesepersol.com

Farnese Persol, Piazza Campo de’ Fiori 56, tel.

Greenwich, Via G. Bodoni 59, tel. 065745825

066864395, www.cinemafarnesepersol.com

Intrastevere, Vicolo Moroni 3, tel. 065884230

Greenwich, Via G. Bodoni 59, tel. 065745825

Lux, Via Massaciuccoli 31, tel. 0686391361

Intrastevere, Vicolo Moroni 3, tel. 065884230

Nuovo Olimpia, Via in Lucina 16/g, tel.

Lux, Via Massaciuccoli 31, tel. 0686391361

066861068

Nuovo Olimpia, Via in Lucina 16/g, tel.

Nuovo

066861068

Sacher, Largo Ascianghi 1, tel. 065818116

Odeon,

Nuovo

Piazza

Sacher,

Stefano

Largo

Jacini

Ascianghi

22, tel.

1,

0686391361

tel. 065818116

Space Odeon, Moderno, Piazza Stefano Piazza della Jacini Repubblica 22, tel. 0686391361 44, tel.

06892111

Space Moderno, Piazza della Repubblica 44, tel.

Space 06892111 Parco de’ Medici, Viale Salvatore Rebecchini

3-5, tel. 06892111

Space Parco de’ Medici, Viale Salvatore Rebecchini

3-5, tel. 06892111


d

p

p

38 Wanted in Rome | December 2017

tTeatro

06684000314, ww

T

Teatro Belli,

06684000314, ww

ww

T

Teatro

ww

Brancaccio,

ww

T

Teatro ww Ghione,

ww

T

Teatro ww

06684000311, ww

T

06684000311, ww


WANTED

inROME

junior

Holiday Writing from

St. Stephen’s School

The Creative Writing and Visual Arts Classes at St.

Stephen’s understand the beautiful chiaroscuro that

occurs when the brightest lights shine during the

darkest nights. Teachers Ms Egan, Ms Fedich, and

Ms Guerra hope that you will enjoy these works by

students, celebrating the wonders of the season and

the ways in which we continue to light our paths

through darkness, literal and metaphorical.

A Collaboration by Natalie S. and Ilaria C., Grade 12

Pulp Serenity

The hill was plastered with bright orange trees,

peeling tambourines like skins of mandarins.

The wind rumbled the trees and ruffled the waves.

I foraged for you.

Esmeralda I., Grade 9

Snow lights

Snowflakes were falling down on the frozen lake covered

with frost, creating a soft and white carpet. You could hear

the laughter of the children in the distance that got lower

and lower and farther as the sun went down over the vast

hills. You could still hear the Christmas carols of the stalls

not far from there and the rustle of the skates of those

who skated on the lake, creating intertwined lines on the

white carpet that covered the majestic lake. The chestnut

smell became lighter and lighter as the ovens were turned

off and the windows of the houses were closed and the

only ones remaining outside under the night sky were

those full of snow, looking at the snowflakes covering even

the flashing colored lights that covered every corner and

wall that kept the city alive.

The fire of this year burning out, creating a blazing next

year,

A celebration filled with the next chapter of our lives,

A time of joy and of new beginnings, the new year’s

celebration.

Uma S., Grade 10

The end of another year

Lights, everywhere.

Decorated on the balconies of apartments.

On the door frames, and windows of houses.

Constantino M., Grade 10

A New Year

The evergreen leaves forever stuck to the ground,

Frozen branches stiffly swaying in the icy wind,

As the match brings flame to the dry logs inside,

a pink warm scent flows through the home.

Torn paper and ribbons left behind by eager children

everywhere,

Cold white snow falling from the gray cool sky,

A picture perfect moment during the years first and final

frost,

with the wheel of the world turning again to a new year.

Illustration by Milena A., Grade 12.

42 | December 2021Wanted in Rome


Illuminating the tiny cracks and crevices of even the

darkest spaces.

Sparkling stars,

A grand mystical, moon, lighting the way

for the ones who thrive at night.

Laughter, breaking across the world.

In warm houses,

filled with the sweet and savory aroma of spices and

confectionary dishes.

Giggling children,

crowding the streets,

Playing with fire.

Small, sizzling sparklers, in the little hands of kids.

Big fireworks in the hands of the elders.

Pink, purple, orange, blue.

Every color and every hue.

Loud music in the streets,

the melodies and tunes from singers, and from those who

think that they are singing.

Basking in the snugness of familial, familiar love.

Bathing in the warmth of the quiet, crackling, fireplace.

Eating salty, sugary treats until you lose fervor, and your

stomach trembles.

Seeing smiling faces, and those same twinkling stars

which decorate the night sky, in their eyes.

Those few blissful days make up for those many months

in isolation.

Unable to see our loved ones, because of the raging

dangers of the outside world.

Tears forming in your eyes,

as the glee engulfs you and makes you feel light.

Like lying on a delicate cloud of pure joy.

The sore ache in your stomach keeps that memory fresh

for days.

Love, so much love.

Why can’t it always be like this?

Diwali, Hanukkah, Christmas,

or any other celebration which you commemorate,

wherever in the world it be;

you will surely feel the beauty and true essence of the

Holidays.

Riccardo C., Grade 10

Taciturn joy

The sun, ever-present in the nooks and crannies between

the buildings,

shining its gold on lunging leaves and piercingly red

petals.

Only tainting some parts of the sky,

Illustration by Esma G., Grade 11.

something so beautiful it closes your throat up as if you

were about to cry,

left to dwell on the melancholies of lives you never lived.

What a lucky little secret part of the world that is.

The lucky blind muse opened my eyes to it.

Christmas-y cute lil thing:

A little green world, developed on a branch of a christmas

tree.

Enveloped in silence it seems to be, yet everything on it

moves, talks and sings.

They even have carols to celebrate. And sure,

squirrels don’t really have a voice, but all that birds do

is chant.

That really makes me think, do they sit on a little table,

ants, worms and all, exchanging gifts and feeling that

warmth only family can give?

Asia M., Grade 10

The people walking down the roads

Became far less and less,

As December spreads its icy breath

Amongst the city houses, penetrating the barrier of the

chimneys

That crack and extinguish under its frigid grasp.

The buildings, and streets, now coated white

Glimmer underneath the pale moonlight,

Whilst the town’s roads are adorned with sparkling bulbs,

And colorful tents that line the sidewalks,

Offering mulled wine, hot cider vinegar, and candied

treats for the children.

The festivities have begun in december’s last days,

And the Christmas tree is decked with evergreen leaves,

Sparkling red glass balls, and twinkling lights.

It stands tall, above all,

those who are lost searching for their way home,

those who have found the pieces of themselves broken,

those who have retrieved their butchered hearts, bloody

and cold

They wander adrift in the still cold of December's farewell

snow.

WANTED IN ROME JUNIOR: For young writers and artists

Wanted in Rome accepts creative contributions from students in all international schools in Rome. Articles on topics related to either the student’s life in

Rome or their school projects can be submitted by their class teachers. The work should be no more than 1,000 words and we also accept illustrations.

Teachers who would like to propose a project can contact editorial@wantedinrome.com.

Wanted in Rome • December 2021 | 43


TEATRO NAZIONALE

DECEMBER 4 -5

GIOVANNI SOLLIMA

Acquaprofonda

CONDUCTOR CARLO DONADIO

DIRECTOR LUIS ERNESTO DOÑAS

TEATRO DELL’OPERA DI ROMA ORCHESTRA

WITH THE PARTECIPATION OF THE TEATRO DELL’OPERA

DI ROMA SCHOLA CANTORUM

NEW PRODUCTION, COMMISSION AND COPRODUCTION

TEATRO DELL’OPERA DI ROMA

AND ASLICO/TEATRO SOCIALE DI COMO – PROGETTO OPERA DOMANI

TEATRO COSTANZI

DECEMBER 4 - 12

GIACOMO PUCCINI

Tosca

CONDUCTOR PAOLO ARRIVABENI

DIRECTOR ALESSANDRO TALEVI

TEATRO DELL’OPERA DI ROMA ORCHESTRA AND CHORUS

WITH THE PARTECIPATION OF THE TEATRO DELL’OPERA DI ROMA

SCUOLA DI CANTO CORALE

A TEATRO DELL’OPERA DI ROMA PRODUCTION

TEATRO COSTANZI

DECEMBER 19 -

JANUARY 2

PËTR IL’IČ ČAJKOVSKIJ

The nutcracker

CONDUCTOR NIR KABARETTI

CHOREOGRAPHER GIULIANO PEPARINI

TEATRO DELL’OPERA DI ROMA ÉTOILES, PRINCIPAL DANCERS,

SOLOISTS AND CORPS DE BALLET

WITH THE PARTECIPATION OF THE TEATRO DELL’OPERA DI ROMA

BALLET SCHOOL

A TEATRO DELL’OPERA DI ROMA PRODUCTION

Ettore Festa, HaunagDesign - IIllustration by Gianluigi Toccafondo

operaroma.it

FOUNDERS PRIVATE SHAREHOLDERS PATRONS


dance

dance

Teatro Costanzi, Teatro dell'Opera di Roma,

Piazza Beniamino Gigli 1, www.operaroma.it

Teatro Olimpico, Piazza Gentile da Fabriano

Teatro Costanzi, Teatro dell'Opera di Roma,

17, www.teatroolimpico.it

Piazza Beniamino Gigli 1, www.operaroma.it

Teatro Vascello, Via Giacinto Carini 78,

Teatro Olimpico, Piazza Gentile da Fabriano

www.teatrovascello.it

17, www.teatroolimpico.it

Teatro Vascello, Via Giacinto Carini 78,

www.teatrovascello.it

opera

opera

Teatro Costanzi, Teatro dell'Opera di Roma,

Piazza Beniamino Gigli 1, www.operaroma.it

Teatro Costanzi, Teatro dell'Opera di Roma,

Piazza Beniamino Gigli 1, www.operaroma.it

p

pop rock

rock

Concert venues ranging from major pop and

rock groups to jazz and acoustic gigs.

Concert venues ranging from major pop and

Alexanderplatz, rock groups to Via jazz Ostia and acoustic 9, tel. 0683775604 gigs.

www.alexanderplatzjazzclub.it

Angelo Alexanderplatz, Mai Altrove, Via Ostia Via 9, tel. delle 0683775604 Terme di

Caracalla www.alexanderplatzjazzclub.it

55, www.angelomai.org

Atlantico, Angelo Mai Viale Altrove, dell’Oceano Via Atlantico delle Terme 271d, di

tel. Caracalla 065915727, 55, www.angelomai.org

www.atlanticoroma.it

Auditorium Atlantico, Viale Parco dell’Oceano della Musica, Atlantico Viale 271d, P. de

Coubertin, tel. 065915727, tel. 06892982, www.atlanticoroma.it

www.auditorium.com

Casa Auditorium del Jazz, Parco Viale di della Porta Musica, Ardeatina Viale 55, P. tel. de

06704731, Coubertin, www.casajazz.it

tel. 06892982, www.auditorium.com

Casa del Jazz, Viale di Porta Ardeatina 55, tel.

06704731, www.casajazz.it

theatre

theatre

Teatro Argentina, Largo di Torre Argentina 52, tel.

06684000314, www.teatrodiroma.net

Teatro Argentina, Largo di Torre Argentina 52, tel.

Teatro Belli, Piazza di S. Apollonia 11, tel. 065894875,

06684000314, www.teatrodiroma.net

www.teatrobelli.it

Teatro Belli, Piazza di S. Apollonia 11, tel. 065894875,

Teatro

www.teatrobelli.it

Brancaccio, Via Merulana 244, tel. 0680687231

www.teatrobrancaccio.it

Teatro Brancaccio, Via Merulana 244, tel. 0680687231

Teatro www.teatrobrancaccio.it

Ghione, Via delle Fornaci 37, tel. 066372294

www.teatroghione.it

Teatro Ghione, Via delle Fornaci 37, tel. 066372294

Teatro www.teatroghione.it

India, Lungotevere Vittorio Gassman 1, tel.

06684000311, www.teatrodiroma.net

Teatro India, Lungotevere Vittorio Gassman 1, tel.

06684000311, www.teatrodiroma.net

50 | Jan 2019 • Wanted in Rome

Lanificio 159, Via di Pietralata 159, tel.

0641780081, www.lanificio159.com

Live Lanificio Alcazar, 159, Via Via Cardinale Pietralata Merry del 159, Val tel. 14,

tel. 0641780081, 065810388, www.lanificio159.com

www.livealcazar.com

Monk Live Alcazar, Club, Via Via Cardinale Giuseppe Merry Mirri del 35, Val 14, tel.

0664850987, tel. 065810388, www.monkroma.it

www.livealcazar.com

PalaLottomatica, Monk Club, Via Piazzale Giuseppe dello Mirri Sport 35, 1, tel. tel.

06540901, 0664850987, www.palalottomatica.it

www.monkroma.it

Rock PalaLottomatica, in Roma, Via Piazzale Appia dello Nuova Sport 1245, 1, tel. tel.

06540901, www.palalottomatica.it

0654220870 www.rockinroma.com

Rock in Roma, Via Appia Nuova 1245, tel.

Teatro Quirinetta, Via Marco Minghetti 5, tel.

0669925616, 0654220870 www.rockinroma.com

www.quirinetta.com

Teatro Quirinetta, Via Marco Minghetti 5, tel.

Unplugged in Monti, Blackmarket, Via

0669925616, www.quirinetta.com

Panisperna 101, www.unpluggedinmonti.com

Unplugged in Monti, Blackmarket, Via

Panisperna 101, www.unpluggedinmonti.com

Teatro Olimpico, Piazza Gentile da Fabriano 17, tel.

063265991, www.teatroolimpico.it

Teatro Olimpico, Piazza Gentile da Fabriano 17,

Teatro S. Genesio, Via Podgora 1, tel. 063223432,

tel. 063265991, www.teatroolimpico.it

www.teatrosangenesio.it

Teatro S. Genesio, Via Podgora 1, tel. 063223432

Teatro

www.teatrosangenesio.it

Sistina, Via Sistina 129, tel. 064200711, www.ilsistina.it

Teatro Sistina, Via Sistina 129, tel. 064200711,

Teatro www.ilsistina.it Vascello, Via Giacinto Carini 78, tel 065898031

www.teatrovascello.it

Teatro Vascello, Via Giacinto Carini 78,

Teatro tel. 065898031, Vittoria, www.teatrovascello.it

Piazza di S. Maria Liberatrice 10, tel.

065781960, www.teatrovittoria.it

Teatro Vittoria, Piazza di S. Maria Liberatrice 10,

tel. 065781960, www.teatrovittoria.it

Wanted 51 in | Rome Oct 2018 • December • Wanted 2021 in Rome | 45


46 | December 2021Wanted in Rome


PANGIALLO: ROMAN CHRISTMAS CAKE

PANGIALLO HAS BEEN A TRADITIONAL CHRISTMAS TREAT IN ROME SINCE ANCIENT ROMAN TIMES

Literally meaning “yellow bread,” pangiallo is a traditional Roman sweet eaten at Christmas.

It is made from a mixture of dried and candied fruit, nuts, citrus peel, honey and dark chocolate which are combined and formed into a dome shape.

The cake is brushed with a saffron glaze and baked in the oven to create a golden yellow outer crust and a dense, rich, sticky interior.

Pangiallo is originally an ancient recipe from the Roman Imperial age when it was made and gifted during the winter solstice to wish for the return

of the sun, hence its colour and round shape.

Nowadays pangiallo is harder to track down than the more diffused festive treats such as panforte or panpepato, yet it can still be found in some of

the artisanal bakeries of the city around the yuletide period.

However, preparing pangiallo at home is very simple and will fill your house with a delicious warm aroma. The recipe below is a basic guideline, but

you could also add dried figs, pine nuts or spices such as nutmeg, ginger or cinnamon according to your own taste. Once made it keeps well so it

makes an excellent homemade Christmas gift for friends and family.

PANGIALLO

80g almonds

80g hazelnuts

80g walnuts

40g pistachios

100g sultanas

Ingredients

40g mixed candied fruit

100g honey

100g dark chocolate

Grated zest of 1 lemon

Grated zest of 1 orange

80g flour 00

FOR THE GLAZE

2 small sachets of saffron (2 x 0.1g bags)

2 tbsp flour 00

2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

By Kate Zagorski

Preheat the oven to 180°C. Place the dark chocolate into a glass bowl over a pan of boiling water and melt until smooth. While the chocolate is

melting roughly chop the almonds, hazelnuts, walnuts and pistachios and put into a large mixing bowl.

Add the grated lemon and orange zest, the sultanas and the candied fruit and combine everything together well using a fork. Add the honey and

continue to mix as you gradually pour in the melted chocolate. Lastly add the flour and, once combined, use your hands to push down and form

a compact dough.

Place the dough on a baking tray lined with greaseproof paper and use your hands to mould it into a dome shape. To make the golden glaze put

2 tablespoons of flour into a clean bowl, add the olive oil and saffron and mix. Then gradually add cold water, bit by bit, until you have a thick,

creamy texture. Brush the glaze over the top of the dome until it is completely covered then bake in the oven at 180°C for 35-40 minutes until

the outer crust is firm.

Kate Zagorski has lived in Italy since 2000. Married to a food-obsessed Roman chef, she leads food tours and also works as a freelance food and travel writer.


The best wine bars in Rome:

ten of our favourites that also serve food

Sometimes an excellent wine bar can be even better than a good restaurant, and for this reason

we have put together a definitive list

Brylla – Trieste

Brylla is a modern wine bar with a a very smart

idea: Coravin. Thanks to an unusual contraption,

the bottles can be opened but still keep well. The

outcome is extraordinary, you can try a glass of

anything on the menu. And that’s hundreds of

different grapes, from a more modest wine to a

Chateau Lafitte, either for a taster, by the glass,

half bottle or bottle. There’s a fairly good menu

too (but you could find better). Via Chiana 77, tel.

0685355669.

Fafiuché – Monti

Fafiuché is a small sanctuary, a haven, a shelter

from life’s chaos. On a backstreet in Monti is the

wine bar where you’ll find high quality Piedmont

wines and also delicious dishes, such as braised

meat, mixed plates of meats and cheeses accompanied

by preserves. If you are lucky you might be

able to nab one of the (few) tables outside. Via

della Madonna dei Monti 28, tel. 066990968.

Litro – Monteverde

Litro has much to say for it and little wrong with it:

the location is great with a lovely outdoor space.

The staff are passionate and attentive. The wine

list (all organic) is excellent. The wines are made

with the highest quality ingredients, unlike other

wines you might find round and about. Via Fratelli

Bonnet 5, tel. 0645447639.

Sogno Autarchico – Prati

Near the Sorpasso house, this venue isn’t particularly

nice indoors – the room is crammed with a

large bar, a few tables and a lounge area. But this

wine bar earns a prized place on our list, thanks

to Gianni Ruggiero, who is also the sommelier at

Simposio. You’ll find regulars here spanning all sorts

of ages, who hold this bar in high regard. Via

Properzio 32, tel. 0668801310.

Il Sorí – S. Lorenzo

Small and cosy, an oasis in S. Lorenzo, hidden

amongst an array of fast food eateries with

outdoor seating. Sorì really knows its stuff about

wines, and also about cooking. As well as other

delicious dishes you can try the excellent Gallega

octopus (€15), the crispy toasted patanegra

(Spanish ham, the beef tartare or wild boar cheek.

Via dei Volsci 51, tel. 3934318681.

Remigio Champagne e Vino – Appio

Remigio is a hidden gem between via Tuscolana

and Appia. There’s a wide variety of champagne

and sparkling wines available, but there are also

a great number of still wines to choose from. We

recommend pairing a glass of wine with the steak

tartare, which is one of the best around. All the

dishes are excellent, especially the crostini, pastrami,

and salted cod. Also open at lunchtime. Via S.

Maria Ausiliatrice 15, tel 06789228.

La Barrique – Monti

At this very popular bar you can have an

enjoyable meal alone, at one of the wooden

tables, gazing at the shelves that show off the

many wine bottles. The array of wines is truly

excellent, and includes some organic bottles. They

also offer wine by the glass, and you can choose

between slightly cheaper wines or some rather

special ones. There aren’t many dishes on offer,

but there’s always something tasty. Via del

Boschetto 41/b, tel 0647825953.

Il Goccetto – Historical centre

An institution, one of the city’s first wine bars, a cult

spot for Romans and tourists looking for a touch of

the gourmet. They both sit by the bar waiting for

an extraordinary platter of meats and cheeses

which they wash down with a glass of wine. Cosy

and intimate, il Goccetto is a perfect mix between

a wine bar offering 800 bottles and a Venetian

bacaro (the venetian word for wine bar). Truly one

of the best wine bars in Rome. Via dei Banchi

Vecchi 14, tel 066864268.

Al Vino al Vino – Monti

While there might not always be an enthusiastic

and jolly atmosphere it’s definitely worth a visit.

The owner Giacomo is a man of few words, who

watches football games on the television while

preparing the cheese and meat boards. Unfortunately

these are the only things on the menu,

other than a very saucy aubergine parmigiana.

We recommend taking your glass outside and

watching passersby. There is a good selection of

wines on offer. Via dei Serpenti 19, tel.

06485803.

Trimani Wine Bar – Fiume

Trimani has just celebrated its 25th birthday, and

at this respectable age has certainly become one

of Rome’s most classic wine bars. Elegant and a

little formal, there’s an intimate atmosphere and

an excellent kitchen. They serve an age-old dish,

crostino with lard from the butcher Silvio Brarda

and mozzarella. You can also enjoy carpacci,

buffalo mozzarella and many other dishes. It is

filled with tables, there are no stools at the bar.

Via Cernaia 37, tel. 064469630.

www.puntarellarossa.it


Associations

American International Club of Rome

tel. 0645447625, www.aicrome.org

American Women’s Association of Rome

tel. 064825268, www.awar.org

Association of British Expats in Italy

britishexpatsinitaly@gmail.com

Canadian Club of Rome

canadarome@gmail.com

Circolo di Cultura Mario Mieli

Gay and lesbian international contact group,

tel. 065413985, www.mariomieli.net

Commonwealth Club of Rome

ccrome08@gmail.com

Daughters of the American Revolution

Pax Romana Chapter NSDAR

paxromana@daritaly.com, www.daritaly.com

Books

The following bookshops and libraries have books

in English and other languages as specified.

Almost Corner Bookshop

Via del Moro 45, tel. 065836942

Anglo American Bookshop

Via delle Vite 102, tel. 066795222

Bibliothèque Centre Culturel

Saint-Louis de France (French)

Largo Toniolo 20-22, tel. 066802637

www.saintlouisdefrance.it

La librerie Française de Rome La Procure (French)

Piazza S. Luigi dei Francesi 23,

tel. 0668307598, www.libreriefrancaiserome.com

Libreria Feltrinelli International

Via V.E. Orlando 84, tel. 064827878, www.lafeltrinelli.it

Religious

All Saints’ Anglican Church

Via del Babuino 153/b tel. 0636001881

Sunday service 08.30 and 10.30

Anglican Centre

Piazza del Collegio Romano 2,

tel. 066780302, www.anglicancentreinrome.com

Beth Hillel (Jewish Progressive Community)

tel. 3899691486, www.bethhillelroma.org

Bible Baptist Church

Via di Castel di Leva 326, tel. 3342934593,

www.bbcroma.org, Sunday 11.00

Christian Science Services

Via Stresa 41, tel. 063014425

Church of All Nations

Lungotevere Michelangelo 7, tel. 069870464

Church of Sweden

Via A. Beroli 1/e, tel. 068080474, Sunday service 11.15

(Swedish)

International Women’s Club of Rome

tel. 0633267490, www.iwcofrome.it

Irish Club of Rome

irishclubofrome@gmail.com, www.irishclubofrome.org

Luncheon Club of Rome

tel. 3338466820

Patrons of Arts in the Vatican Museums

tel. 0669881814, www.vatican-patrons.org

Professional Woman’s Association

www.pwarome.org

United Nations Women’s Guild

tel. 0657053628, unwg@fao.org,

www.unwgrome.multiply.com

Welcome Neighbor

tel. 3479313040, dearprome@tele2.it,

www.wntome-homepage.blogspot.com

Libreria Quattro Fontane (international)

Via delle Quattro Fontane 20/a, tel. 064814484

Libreria Spagnola Sorgente (Spanish)

Piazza navona 90, tel. 0668806950,

www.libreriaspagnola.it

Open Door Bookshop

(second hand books English, French, German, Italian)

Via della Lungaretta 23, tel. 065896478,

www.books-in-italy.com

Otherwise

Via del Governo Vecchio, tel. 066879825,

www.otherwisebookshop.com

Footsteps Inter-Denominational Christian

South Rome, tel. 0650917621, 3332284093,

North Rome, tel. 0630894371, akfsmes.styles@tiscali.it

International Central Gospel Church

Via XX Settembre 88, tel. 0655282695

International Christian Fellowship

Via Guido Castelnuovo 28,

tel. 065594266, Sunday service 11.00

Jewish Community

Tempio Maggiore, Lungotevere Cenci, tel. 066840061

Lay Centre at Foyer Unitas

Largo della Sanità Militare 60, tel. 067726761

Lutheran Church

Via Toscana 7, corner Via Sicilia 70,

tel. 064817519, Sunday service 10.00 (German)

Ponte S. Angelo Methodist Church

Piazza Ponte S. Angelo, tel. 066868314,

Sunday Service 10.30

50 | December 2021Wanted in Rome


Pontifical Irish College (Roman Catholic)

Via dei SS. Quattro 1,

tel. 06772631. Sunday service 10.00

Roma Baptist Church

Piazza S. Lorenzo in Lucina 35,

tel. 066876652, 066876211, Suday service

10.30, 13.00 (Filipino), 16.00 (Chinese)

Roma Buddhist Centre Vihara

Via Mandas 2, tel. 0622460091

Rome International Church

Via Cassia km 16, www.romeinternational.org

Rome Mosque (Centro Islamico)

Via della Moschea, tel. 068082167, 068082258

St Andrew’s Presbyterian Church

Via XX Settembre 7, tel. 064827627,

Sunday service 11.00

St Francis Xavier del Caravita (Roman Catholic)

Via Caravita 7, www.caravita.org,

Sunday service 11.00

Support groups

Alcoholics Anonymous

tel. 064742913, www.aarome.com

Archè

(HIV+children and their families)

tel. 0677250350, www.arche.it

Associazione Centro Astalli

(Jesuit refugee centre) Via degli Astalli 14/a,

tel. 0669700306

Associazione Ryder Italia

(Support for cancer patients and their families)

tel. 065349622/06582045580,

www.ryderitalia.it

Astra (Anti-stalking risk assessment)

tel. 066535499, www.differenzadonna.it

Caritas soup kitchen

(Mensa Giovanni Paolo II) Via delle Sette Sale 30,

tel. 0647821098, 11.00-13.30 daily

Caritas foreigners’ support centre

Via delle Zoccolette 19, tel. 066875228, 06681554

Caritas hostel

Via Marsala 109, tel. 064457235

Caritas legal assistance

Piazza S. Giovanni in Laterano 6/a, tel. 0669886369

Celebrate Recovery Christian group

tel. 3381675680

Transport

• Atac (Rome bus, metro and tram)

tel. 800431784, www.atac.roma.it

• Ciampino airport tel.06794941, www.adr.it

• Fiumicino airport tel. 0665951, www.adr.it

• Taxi tel. 060609-065551-063570-068822-064157-

066645-064994

• Traffic info tel. 1518

• Trenitalia (national railways) tel. 892021,

www.trenitalia.it

St Isidore College (Roman Catholic)

Via degli Artisti 41, tel. 064885359,

Sunday service 10.00

St Patrick’s Church (Roman Catholic),

Via Boncompagni 31, tel. 068881827,

www.stpatricksamericaninrome.org

Weekday Masses in English 18.00, Saturday Vigil 18.00,

Sunday 09.00 and 10.30

St Paul’s within-the-Walls (Anglican Episcopal)

Via Nazionale, corner Via Napoli, tel. 064883339,

Sunday service 08.30, 10.30 (English), 13.00 (Spanish)

St Silvestro Church (Roman Catholic)

Piazza S. Silvestro 1, tel. 066977121,

Sunday service 10.00 and 17.30

Venerable English College (Roman Catholic),

Via di Monserrato 45,

tel. 066868546, Sunday service 10.00

Comunità di S. Egidio

Piazza di S. Egidio 3/a, tel. 068992234

Comunità di S. Egidio soup kitchen

Via Dandolo 10, tel. 065894327,

17.00-19.30 Wed, Fri, Sat

Information line for disabled

tel. 800271027

Joel Nafuma Refugee Centre

St Paul’s within-the-Walls

Via Nazionale, corner Via Napoli,

tel. 064883339

Mason Perkins Deafness Fund

(Support for deaf and deaf-blind children),

tel. 06444234511, masonperkins@gmail.com,

www.mpds.it

Overeaters Anonymous

tel. 064743772

Salvation Army

(Esercito della Salvezza)

Centro Sociale di Roma “Virgilio Paglieri”

Via degli Apuli 41, tel. 064451351

Support for elderly victims of crime

(Italian only) Largo E. Fioritto 2, tel. 0657305104

The Samaritans Onlus

(Confidential telephone helpline for the distressed)

tel. 800860022

Chiamaroma

24-hour, multilingual information line for services in

Rome, run by the city council, tel. 060606

Emergency numbers

• Ambulance tel. 118

• Carabinieri tel. 112

• Electricity and water faults (Acea) tel. 800130336

• Fire brigade tel. 115

• Gas leaks (Italgas-Eni) tel. 800900999

• Police tel. 113

• Rubbish (Ama) tel. 8008670355

52 | December 2021Wanted in Rome

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