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The Ethnicity of the Sea Peoples - RePub - Erasmus Universiteit ...

The Ethnicity of the Sea Peoples - RePub - Erasmus Universiteit ...

in order to ask fifty

in order to ask fifty years of life from Amon for myself, over and above my fate.’ And it shall come to pass that, after another time, a messenger may come from the land of Egypt who knows writing, and he may read your name on the stela. And you will receive water (in) the West, like the gods who are here!” And he said to me: “This which you have said to me is a great testimony of words!” So I said to him: “As for the many things which you have said to me, if I reach the place where the High Priest of Amon is and he sees how you have (carried out this) commission, it is your (carrying out of this) commission (which) will draw out something for you.” And I went (to) the shore of the sea, to the place where the timber was lying, and I spied eleven ships belonging to the Tjeker coming in from the sea, in order to say: “Arrest him! Don’t let a ship of his (go) to the land of Egypt!” Then I sat down and wept. And the letter scribe of the Prince came out to me, and he said to me: “What is the matter with you?” And I said to him: “Haven’t you seen the birds go down to Egypt a second time? Look at them – how they travel to the cool pools! (But) how long shall I be left here! Now don’t you see those who are coming to arrest me?” So he went and told it to the Prince. And the Prince began to weep because of the words which were said to him, for they were painful. And he sent out to me his letter scribe, and he brought to me two jugs of wine and one ram. And he sent to me Ta-net-Not, an Egyptian singer who was with him, saying: “Sing to him! Don’t let his heart take on cares!” And he sent to me, say: “Eat and drink! Don’t let your heart take on cares, for tomorrow you shall hear whatever I have to say.” When morning came, he had his assembly summoned and he stood in their midst, and he said to the Tjeker: “What have you come (for)?” And they said to him: 56 “We have come after the blasted ships which you are sending to Egypt with our opponents!” But he said to them: “I cannot arrest the messenger of Amon inside my land. Let me send him away, and you go after him to arrest him.” So he loaded me in, and he sent me away from there at the harbor of the sea. And the wind cast me on the land of Alashiya [= Cyprus]. And they of the town came out against me to kill me, but I forced my way through them to the place where Heteb, the princess of the town, was. I met her as she was going out of one house of hers and going into another of hers. So I greeted her, and I said to the people who were standing near her: “Isn’t there one of you who understands Egyptian?” And one of them said: “I understand (it).” So I said to him: “Tell my lady that I have heard, as far away as Thebes, the place where Amon is, that injustice is done in every town but justice is done in the land of Alashiya. Yet injustice is done here every day!” And she said: “Why, what do you (mean) by saying it?” So I told her: “If the sea is stormy and the wind casts me on the land where you are, you should not let them take me in charge to kill me. For I am a messenger of Amon. Look here – as for me, they will search for me all the time! As to the crew of the Prince of Byblos which they are bent on killing, won’t its lord find ten crews of yours, and he also kills them?” So she had the people summoned, and they stood (there). And she said to me: “Spend the night (…).” (…)” At this point the papyrus breaks off. Since the tale is told in the first person, it is fair to assume that Wenamon returned to Egypt to tell his story, in some measure of safety or success (Pritchard 1969: 25-9). El-Amarna Ramesses II Merneptah Ramesses III Lukka x x x Sherden x x x x Shekelesh x x Teresh x x Ekwesh x Denye(n) x Tjeker x Peleset x Weshesh x Table 1. Overview of the mention of the Sea Peoples in the various Egyptian sources from the Late Bronze Age.

6. LUKKA AND THE LUKKA LANDS Since the time of Emmanuel de Rougé, who wrote in 1867, the Lukka have straightforwardly been identified with the Lycians. 107 The latter are known from Homeros onwards to inhabit the valley of the Xanthos river and its immediate surroundings in Anatolia. 108 As to the precise habitat of their equivalents in Hittite texts, Trevor Bryce has put forward two specific theses, namely (1) Lycaonia to the east and (2) Caria to the west of classical Lycia. Of these two theses, the first one is primarily based on the fact that in a fragment of Hattusilis III’s (1264-1239 BC) annals, Keilschrifturkunden aus Boghazköy (= KUB) XXI 6a, the Lukka lands (KUR.KUR MEŠ URU Luqqa) appear in a paragraph preceding one on military campaigns against countries like Walma, San®ata, and Walwara known from the border description of the province of Tar®untassa – a Hittite province situated to the east of (the) Lukka (lands). 109 The second thesis takes as its starting point that in the socalled Tawagalawas-letter (KUB XIV 3), probably from the reign of Muwatallis II (1295-1271 BC), 110 people from Lukka (LU MEŠ URU Luqqa) are mentioned directly following the destruction of Attarima. In the same letter Attarima is associated with Iyalanda, which for its association with Atriya must be located close to Millawanda (or Milawata). If Millawanda (or Milawata) may be identified with classical Miletos (as is commonly asserted by now), it follows according to this line of reasoning that people from Lukka must be situated in its immediate Carian hinterland. 111 What strikes us about these suggestions is that precisely the region of the Xanthos valley and its immediate surroundings in the middle are left out – a situation which, for the lack of remains of Late Bronze Age settlements here, appears to be neatly reflected in the archaeological record (but as we will see deceitfully so). 112 Bryce makes an exception, though, for the Lycian 107 De Rougé 1867: 39. 108 Bryce 1986: 13 “There can be little doubt that for Homer Lycia and the Xanthos valley were one and the same”. 109 Bryce 1974: 397 (with reference to Cornelius); Bryce 1992: 121-3; cf. Otten 1988: 37-8. 110 Smit 1990-1 ; Gurney 1990. 111 Bryce 1974: 398-403; Bryce 1992: 123-6. 112 Bryce 1974: 130; cf. Keen 1998: 214. 57 coast. This seems to have formed part of Lukka according to the combined evidence of El-Amarna text no. 38 and RS 20.238 from Ras Shamra/Ugarit. 113 Of these texts, the first one bears reference to piratical raids on Alasiya (= Cyprus) and apparently on the Egyptian coast by the people of the land of Lukki, which is therefore likely to have had a coastal zone. The second informs us that the king of Ugarit has sent his entire fleet to the waters off the coast of Lukka, presumably, as suggested by Michael Astour, in an attempt to ward off the passage of the Sea Peoples from the Aegean into the eastern Mediterranean. 114 If this latter suggestion is correct, we are dealing here with the Lycian coast, indeed. A dramatic change in the state of affairs as presented by Bryce occurred thanks to the recent discovery of a monumental hieroglyphic inscription from the reign of Tud®aliyas IV (1239-1209 BC) at Yalburt in the neighborhood of Ilgın. As demonstrated by Massimo Poetto, this text, which deals with a military campaign in the Lukka lands (lúka UTNAi ), bears reference to the place names Pinata, Awarna, Talawa, and Patara, which are identifiable with classical Pinale or Pinara, Arñne or Arna, Tlawa or Tls, and Pttara or Patara situated in the valley of the lower Xanthos river. 115 It further mentions the place names Luwanda and Hwalatarna, which correspond to classical Loanda and bide or Kaunos in the valley of the Indus river. 116 There can be little doubt, therefore, that, regardless the blank in the archaeological record, the Lukka lands are situated precisely within the confines of classical Lycia proper. This conlusion receives even further emphasis if Machteld Mellink is right in her identification of the Siyanta river, which figures in the border description of Mira in Mursilis II’s (1321-1295 BC) treaty with Kupantakuruntas, with the Xanthos river. 117 A question which remains to be answered is whether the expression “Lukka lands” designates the same geo- 113 Bryce 1992: 128-9; for EA no. 38, see Moran 1992: 111. 114 Astour 1965a: 255; cf. Otten 1993; Keen 1998: 27. 115 Poetto 1993: 47-8 (block 9); 78-80. Note that these identifications are only partly followed by Keen 1998: 214-20. 116 Woudhuizen 1994-5: 174; Woudhuizen 2004a: 30-1. 117 Mellink 1995: 35-6.

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