The Star: June 22, 2017

StarMedia.Digital

9 I HEALTH / FITNESS

Canterbury has some stunning mountain bike

tracks with terrain varying from super flat

to moderatly hilly. From the leisurly Bottle

Lake Forest to the stunnigly scenic Lees Valley,

we’ve rounded up a few favourites;

McLeans Island Track

It is a well built, fast, smooth track that everybody

will enjoy.

10.5KM MAIN LOOP - 30 MINUTES

2KM RIVER LOOP - 8 MINUTES

Add an extra 2km’s with this little detour out

towards the river.

5KM CORINGA LOOP - 15 MINUTES

Head under the bridge for an extra 5km’s

extending the ride into a figure of 8.

The track is made to be ridden in one

direction so make sure you’re heading the

right way!

Bottle Lake Forest

Bottle Lake is a great place to find varied and

fun mountain biking. You can spend a couple of

hours going around with the kids, or go hard

for a 45 minute workout. At the halfway point

you can also reward yourself with a coffee or

ice cream.

BOTTLE LAKE FOREST - 45 MINUTES - 2

HOURS

Crocodile Track

Through the cattle stop, the single track winds

down over farm land and through a small

plantaion before coming out at the Halswell

Quarry. Apart from a small up hill section, it is

all fast down hill, single track.

HALSWELL QUARRY TO THE START OF

THE CROCODILE - 15 - 20 MINUTES

Why should you get back on your bike

as you get older?

1. It’s easy on the joints.

When you sit on a bike, you put your weight

on a pair of bones in the pelvis called the

ischial tuberosities, unlike walking, when you

put your weight on your legs.

2. It’s a great aerobic workout.

Aerobic exercise also triggers the release of

endorphins, the body’s feel-good chemicals—

which may make you feel young at heart.

3. You’ll build up muscle.

As you get older, you lose muscle mass.

Keeping your body fit starts with simply riding

your bike often, While your buttocks and legs

are the obvious muscles being put to work,

you’ll also use abdominal muscles to balance

and stay upright and to a smaller degree your

arms by holding on.

4. Pedaling builds bone.

Resistance activities, such as pushing pedals,

pull on the muscles, and then the muscles pull

on the bone, which increases bone density.

5. It’s great for your wellbeing.

Even half an hour of daily exercise has been

observed to improve people’s subjective

mood and well-being!

canterbury tracks

mountain biking is a great way to get the blood pumping.

Wharfdale Track / Lees Valley

An hours drive from Christchurch, the

Wharfdale Track is very accessible, and

offers a great challenging ride with fantastic

scenery. You can choose to ride the single

track through the Beech forest to the old

Townsend Hut site and turn back and return

the way you came, or carry on along the

4WD track to Lees Valley Road and back

to Oxford via Ashley George Road. There is

also the option to stay a night at the

Wharfdale Hut.

CAR PARK TO WHARFDALE HUT - 4

HOURS ONE WAY

WHARFDALE HUT TO LEES VALLEY ROAD

- 1.5 HOURS

LEES VALLEY ROAD - 3 HOURS

Christchurch Heart Institute and the Heart Foundation

First to Work with Cardiovascular Charity Partnership

Ryman residents and staff raise $330,000 for heart research

The Christchurch Heart Institute is

working alongside the Heart Foundation as

part of an innovative approach to

cardiovascular disease (CVD) research,

following a significant donation of $330,000

from Ryman Healthcare received on the 31

May 2017.

The 2016-17 charity partnership between

Ryman Healthcare and the Heart Foundation,

which has funded the Heart Foundation

Clinical Fellowship, will support a clinical

research study, looking into the scope and

make-up of cardiovascular disease in residents

of Ryman Healthcare facilities.

Associate Professor, Chris Pemberton, of

the Christchurch Heart Institute, based at the

University of Otago, Christchurch, is behind

the idea to run the study which will provide

a clearer picture about the CVD risk in New

Zealand’s retirement healthcare sector.

“It is exciting to be working with the Heart

Foundation, who have informed residents of

Ryman Healthcare facilities about the study,

laying the foundation for the project to

proceed. Ryman residents who volunteer

to take part in the study, will benefit from

increased awareness of their overall health and

any cardiovascular risk. The information we

gather at the Christchurch villages and

others around the country will be used to

raise the standard of cardiovascular care in

New Zealand,” he said.

The study will begin at Ryman retirement

villages in Christchurch, and gradually roll-out

across the country, which is something

Pemberton is looking forward to.

“We want to get going in 2017, firstly

putting systems in place, with a view to starting

the first of the studies later this year.”

The Christchurch Heart Institute, a

University of Otago Research Centre, is

renowned globally for their contribution to

CVD research. In particular, the discoveries

of blood hormones associated with heart

disease which have led to specific blood tests

for heart issues, now being used routinely in

clinics all around the world.

“This project is aimed at taking what we

know in a hospital setting and applying that

knowledge in the primary health sector.

Leading to better management of

cardiovascular disease, before hospital

admission becomes necessary.”

Heart Foundation Chief Executive, Tony

Duncan, is delighted to have been part of the

Ryman Healthcare charity partnership for

2016-17. He believes Ryman’s donation will

undoubtedly support many people in the aged

care sector who are impacted by heart

disease, which is New Zealand’s biggest killer.

“Given the high incidences of heart disease

in the aged care sector, this will make a

significant contribution to the management of

heart disease among the aged.”

Ryman Managing Director Simon Challies

said heart health had been a popular cause.

Over the past 12 months the Ryman family

has been busy with knitting, barbecues, art

shows, raffles and head shaves to raise as

much as possible for the Heart Foundation.

“We all know what a great job the Heart

Foundation does and it has been a popular

charity with residents. We’ve had a record

year for fundraising with residents and staff

participating in a whole lot of fundraisers.

They’re big-hearted people – if you’ll excuse

the pun – and we are delighted to match their

fund-raising dollar-for-dollar. The $330,000

raised is a new record for Ryman.’’

Christchurch

Heart Institute

A University of Otago, Christchurch, research group based

in the School of Medicine at Christchurch Hospital.

World renowned for our contribution to cardiovascular

disease research.

Including discoveries of blood tests to identify specific heart

conditions, now being used routinely to diagnose and guide

treatment all around the world.

If you would like to help, please consider making a donation to

the Christchurch Heart Institute Trust.

Contact: Lorraine Skelton on 03 364 1063,

or lorraine.skelton@cdhb.health.nz

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines