Views
3 months ago

Better Man

30 Days to a better man

30 Days to a better man knowledge and wisdom from a life well lived. By writing his memoir, he guaranteed that his legacy will live on indefinitely. But his life story would have been but a few pages long had he not kept a journal. There are a myriad of other benefits to keeping a daily journal besides remembering what you ate five years ago. So today’s task is to start the journaling habit. Great Men Keep Journals In studying the lives of great men, I’ve noticed a common trait: they were all consistent journal writers. Now, I’m not saying that their greatness is directly attributable to their journaling. I’m sure Captain Cook would still have been a badass even if he hadn’t kept a diary. But I figure, if great men like these thought it was important to keep a journal, maybe I should, too. Heck, if it weren’t for their journals, we probably wouldn’t know much about their great lives and deeds. Here’s a short list of great men from history who kept journals: • Theodore Roosevelt • Thomas Jefferson • Charles Darwin • Benjamin Franklin • Lewis and Clark • Andrew Carnegie • Ralph Waldo Emerson • Captain Cook • Winston Churchill • Sir Edmund Hilary • Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton • Doogie Howser M.D. I could go on, but I think you get the idea. 50

Brett and Kate McKay Why Keep a Journal 1. Your children and grandchildren will want to read it. I know it’s hard to believe right now. Your life probably seems quite ordinary and of little interest to anyone else. And every generation believes that life will pretty much continue on like it is now. When your great-grandpa was kicking it in the 1920s, he thought to himself, “Who would want to read about this new fangled radio or how I get my food out of an icebox? Phhht! That’s boring stuff!” But it’s not boring anymore; to this generation, such a peek at the olden days is fascinating. And so it is with you. When your grandkids are talking to people via hologram, they are going to be absolutely fascinated by your impressions of those ancient things like cell phones. And unfortunately, they’re not going to be curious about it until they get into their 20s, realize you’re going to die, and start asking you questions. Trust me, while you think that you’ll be able to remember everything just as clearly in the future, you won’t. Remember when you were a kid and you thought your experiences would be easily recalled at age 30? Now what do you remember from those days besides that time a dog bit you in the face? As each year passes, the pixels of our memories burn out and the haze sets in. By age 80, you’ll only remember the faintest outlines of the big things that happened to you. But the stuff that’s really interesting is often the little, seemingly mundane details of life. What was a man’s daily routine like in 2009? Of course, the whippersnappers will ask you about the big stuff too: “Where were you when you found out about the attacks on the World Trade Center?” and “What did you think about the election of Barack Obama?” Your journals will give them the answers they’ll be looking for and will bring you closer. And who knows? Maybe the whole world might be interested in your musings someday. You may not think so now, but how many famous men knew that they would be famous before they actually 51