Scottsdale Health November 2019

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THE EFFECTIVE

MEDICAL MASSAGE:

MYOFASCIAL THERAPY

Dr. Bryan Geier talks a new

treatment for pain management

Wouldn’t it be great if you could treat the

majority of all pain related symptoms with a

non-invasive approach? Now, you can. As a

Chiropractor, my education and training was

focused on relieving pain by influencing the

nervous system through the use of spinal

manipulation. However, in my practice I intently

focus on the myo, which is the Latin term for

muscles and connective tissue called fascia.

Here in lies the term Myofascial therapy. When

treating pain, I chose to focus on the myofascia

of the body because this is the most important

component to influencing the Central Nervous

System to decrease pain, specifically honing in

on treating this pain by taking an alternative,

non-invasive approach. Unfortunately,

myofascial therapy receives little attention as

a major source of pain and is seldom taught

in modern medical school training. Even

more unfortunate is the lack of insurance

reimbursement for this important therapy. So,

let’s dig into the topic a little deeper.

running through, around and crisscrossing

every inch of your body including muscle,

organs, blood vessels, nerves, spinal cord,

brain and skin. The central nervous system

receives its greatest amount of sensory nerves

from myofascial tissue. This means that the

fascia is as important or more important than

muscle in sensory input delivery. The key to

this statement is that your myofascia becomes

the byproduct of your environment without

you even realizing it. It experiences stress,

memorizes chronic poor posture, feels the

weight of your head sitting at the computer all

day, and permanently holds onto old untreated

injuries. As a result of never ending signaling to

the brain, the body develops symptoms like pain

and endocrine dysfunction like adrenal fatigue,

dysfunctional mood and brain fog, to name a

few. If the fascia controls the information that

can influence the brain, then this is the first

step to calming down the body’s pain response

and also improving overall global body function.

THE SCIENCE BEHIND PAIN AND MYOFASCIA

The muscular system is the largest sensory

organ. Approximately 50 percent of your

body weight is made up of about 400 skeletal

muscles. Your fascia is actually one giant

interconnected web of connective tissue

WHAT IS MYOFASCIAL THERAPY?

It is a deep tissue treatment involving the

breakdown of fascial adhesions known as

trigger points. These trigger points ultimately

create a permanently shortened muscle,

resulting in pain and muscle dysfunction

and, in turn, weakness and uncoordinated

movements. Myofascial therapy can be

performed in many ways including by a

practitioner’s hands, using tools that break

down adhesions and stretching. This therapy

proves to be a very efficient and effective

therapy for pain management, improving

athletic performance and reducing cellulite.

HOW DOES HEALTHY FASCIA BECOME

UNHEALTHY FASCIA?

This happens when extra layers of fascia grow

due to stress, trauma, repetitive motions,

dehydration and inflammation. Inflammation

comes from repetitive working out or even

eating inflammatory foods such as (but not

limited to) sugar, fried food, certain oils and

processed wheat.

COMMON INJURIES RELATED TO

MYOFASCIAL TRIGGER POINTS

• Pain or stiffness in your neck, mid- or lowback

• Headaches or jaw pain

• Sciatica and other nerve related symptoms

like numbness and tingling

• Tendonitis, Bursitis and Plantar Fasciitis

• Joint pain especially in your shoulder, knee

or wrist

• Generalized dull, achy pain

• Athletic performance issues

CALL 480.800.4924 AND MENTION

SCOTTSDALE HEALTH MAGAZINE TO

RECEIVE 20 PERCENT OFF A PACKAGE

OF THREE VISITS, EQUALING $179.

Dr. Geier is located inside Jewish Community

Center (JCC). A JCC membership is not required

to be treated. Sign up to see Dr. Geier and also

receive a one week pass to the JCC!

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