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WHO ARE THE HUNS?

WHO ARE THE HUNS?

324 The Monroe Doctrine

324 The Monroe Doctrine and Neutrality. their hypnotized eyes. We hope that they will realize howlittle ideas of conquest or chauvinistic policies have to do with true German feeling, and how, little the real thoughts and ambitions of the German Kaiser, that much-misunderstood and grossly-abused man, have to do with the caricatures and insults and calumnies spread through foreign countries. The Americans are the people who are supposed to act as mediators in the matter of peace, for the position as well as the constituent elements of their country would render this rôle a natural one for the United States. But it is to be feared that the short-sighted policy of the government will make all American claims to this important post absolutely untenable. The universal disappointment of the German nation with regard to the attitude hitherto assumed by the American Government may make the negotiations for peace all the more difficult. V. Regarding the Monroe Doctrine and Neutrality in General. The steadily growing entanglement of the American continent in the European war, especially the participation of Canada, the breaches of neutrality by the United States, etc., have brought important international questions to the fore, which are also related to the so-called Monroe Doctrine; and to other problems to which we have already referred in the 1st edition. According to the Monroe Doctrine, the entire western hemisphere is regarded as one single unit so far as its economic territory is concerned;—this territory is supposed to have common political interests. If this interpretation is accepted, it must appear that any act undertaken by a single member of this united America is to be regarded as an action for which the whole of this unified American sphere of interests is responsible, and in especial the United States. If European states are not to have the right of interfering in domestic American or "Pan- American" affairs, even when these affect their interests, be it in a commercial, be it in a political sense, it must naturally be understood on the other hand that all the separate states belonging to this assumed American complexus must refrain from all interference in the domestic politics or conflicts of

The Monroe Doctrine and Neutrality. 325 Europe. As soon as an organized state, situate upon the American continents, ventures to interfere in a European struggle by sending troops to the Old World, it throws down a challenge which demands the taking of military measures which must naturally extend themselves to the American continent. This dictum, which is almost in the nature of a political axiom, has been further elucidated by Judge Dr. Paul Alexander Katz in the "Vossische Zeitung" of October 3rd, 1914. The German Government has so far maintained a most exemplary attitude towards this purely arbitrary Monroe Doctrine, and it has sacrificed much merely for the sake of maintaining friendly relations with the United States. Whether this will be possible in the future, considering the hostile attitude of the American Government is a difficult and momentous question which extends beyond the purpose or scope of this work. In any case the attitude of the government of the United States is such that this great question of the future can hardly be said to appear in a particularly favorable light—in the sense of real Americanism. That nation which frivolously discards its real neutrality and ventures to interfere in European contingencies, possesses no right from the point of view of international law, to consider itself in any degree ex lex so far as European interpretations are concerned. Is it Japan who must persuade the United States of the foolish ishness of its past and present policy of provocation towards Germany? Not only has the Monroe Doctrine been shaken to its very foundations by the position assumed by the United States, but also by the numerous violations of neutrality of which England has been guilty in connection with South American states, especially Brazil and Chile. 1 1 1. A notorious breach of neutrality, for example, according to a Brazilian paper, was the part played by the English cruiser "Glasgow" in the sea-fight off the Malvina Islands. After the battle of Coronel, off the Chilean coast, the "Glasgow" was obliged to put into Rio de Janeiro for repairs. This is permitted to belligerent powers. Warships in such cases are allowed to remain in a neutral harbor, until the necessary repairs are effected, and are under no obligation to be dismantled. They are supposed, however, to make only such repairs as will ensure the safety of the ship's homeward voyage. The "Glasgow," apparently, was completely refitted, and that in the dockyard of the Ministry of Marine. Then

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    • Copyright 1915 by Georg Reimer

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    IV A Foreword. most brilliant judic

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    VI A Foreword. to do. And I hold th

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    CONTENTS. PART ONE. Page: Rules and

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    PART ONE. Rules and Regulations of

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 3 in fav

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 5 "Gentl

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 7 cellor

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. •9 its

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 11 We th

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 13 nothi

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 15 that

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 17 Belgi

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 19 Grey

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 21 but o

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 23 Omega

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 25 i "Ne

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 27 the d

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 29 "Thro

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 31 "From

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 33 which

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 35 Imper

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 37 3. Th

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 39 divis

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 41 Evide

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 43 There

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 45 subst

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    Mobilization and the Morality of Na

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    Violation of Congo Acts. Colonial W

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    Violation of Congo Acts. Colonial W

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    Violation of Congo Acts. Colonial W

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    Violation of Congo Acts. Colonial W

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    The Employment of Barbarous and War

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    The Employment of Barbarous and War

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    Violation of the Neutral Suez Canal

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    Violation of the Neutral Suez Canal

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    Violation of the Neutral Suez Canal

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    Chinese Neutrality and Kiao-Chau. "

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    Chinese Neutrality and Kiao-Chau. 6

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    Chinese Neutrality and Kiao-Chau. 7

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    Chinese Neutrality and Kiao-Chau. 7

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    The Use of Dum-Dum Bullets. 75 empi

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    The Use of Dum-Dum Bullets. 77' aga

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    The Use of Dum-Dum Bullets. 79 to m

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    The Use of Dum-Dum Bullets. 81 inte

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    Treatment of Diplomatic Representat

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    Treatment of Diplomatic Representat

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    Violations of Red Cross Rules. 87 l

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    Violations of Red Cross Rules. 89 5

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    Violations of Red Cross Rules. 91 u

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    Violations of Red Cross Rules. 93 a

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    Violations of Red Cross Rules. 95 t

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    Violations of Red Cross Rules. 97 s

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    Violations of Red Cross Rules. 99 t

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    Violations of Red Cross Rules. 101

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    Violations of Red Cross Rules. 103

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    Violations of Red Cross Rules. 105

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    German Treatment of Prisoners and W

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    German Treatment of Prisoners and W

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    Franc-Tireur Warfare and Cruelty. I

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    Franc-Tireur Warfare and Cruelty. 1

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    Franc-Tireur Warfare and Cruelty. 1

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    Franc-Tireur Warfare and Cruelty. 1

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    Franc-Tireur Warfare and Cruelty. 1

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    Franc-Tireur Warfare and Cruelty. 1

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    Franc-Tireur Warfare and Cruelty. 1

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    Franc-Tireur Warfare and Cruelty. 1

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    Franc-Tireur Warfare and Cruelty. 1

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    Franc-Tireur Warfare and Cruelty. 1

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    French Outrages. 131 to the ground

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    English Outrages. 133 Boer concentr

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    The Frenzy of France. 135 made a st

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    German Restraint and Order. 137 the

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    Inhumane Methods of Warfare. 139 wa

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    Inhumane Methods of Warfare. 141 An

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    Inhumane Methods of Warfare. 143 fr

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    Atrocities of Allied Troops. 145 ha

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    Atrocities of Allied Troops. 147 I

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    Atrocities of Allied Troops. 149 ve

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    Slaughter of Prisoners. 151 which m

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    Compulsory Treason. 153 the Frenchm

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    Premiums for Murder, etc. 155 this

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    Premiums for Murder, etc. 157 serva

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    Premiums for Murder, etc. 159 their

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    Russian Atrocities in East Prussia.

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    Russian Atrocities in East Prussia.

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    Russian Atrocities in East Prussia.

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    Russian Atrocities in East Prussia.

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    Pogroms and Other Russian Atrocitie

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    Pogroms and Other Russian Atrocitie

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    CHAPTER XIV. 173- The German Admini

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    German Administration in Belgium. 1

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    German Administration in Belgium. 1

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    Private Property in War. 179 perty,

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    The Conduct of German Troops. 181 t

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    The Conduct of German Troops. 183 c

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    The Conduct of German Troops. 185 p

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    Plundering and Destruction of Prope

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    Plundering and Destruction of Prope

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    Plundering and Destruction of Prope

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    Plundering and Destruction of Prope

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    Plundering and Destruction of Prope

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    Ruses of War and Official Lies. 197

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    Ruses of War and Official Lies. 199

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    Ruses of War and Official Lies. 201

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    The Destruction of Telegraph Cables

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    The Triple Entente's Vendetta of Li

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    The Triple Entente's Vendetta of Li

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    The Triple Entente's Vendetta of Li

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    The Triple Entente's Vendetta of Li

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    The Triple Entente's Vendetta of Li

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    The Triple Entente's Vendetta of Li

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    The Triple Entente's Vendetta of Li

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    The Triple Entente's Vendetta of Li

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    The Triple Entente's Vendetta of Li

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    The Triple Entente's Vendetta of Li

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    + Add. — Subtract The Triple Ente

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    The Triple Entente's Vendetta of Li

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    CHAPTER XXI. 229 A Few Remarks upon

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    French and Belgian "Atrocity Books.

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    French and Belgian "Atrocity Books.

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    French and Belgian "Atrocity Books.

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    French and Belgian "Atrocity Books.

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    German Refutations and Investigatio

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    German Refutations and Investigatio

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    German Refutations and Investigatio

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    German Refutations and Investigatio

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    Art and Warfare. 247 by the French

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    Art and Warfare. 249 On the 28th of

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    Art and Warfare. 251 pressly forbid

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    Bombardments by Aeroplanes. 253 the

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    Bombardments by Aeroplanes. 255 the

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    Bombardments by Aeroplanes. 257 bee

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    English Business Morals. 259 Contin

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    English Business Morals. 261 means

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    English Business Morals. 263 While

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    Economie War in the English Colonie

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    Economie War in the English Colonie

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    Violations of Neutral States. 269 w

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    Violations of Neutral States. 271 A

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    The Case of the "Lusitania." 375 mi

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    Exchange of German-American Notes.

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    Exchange of German-American Notes.

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    Exchange of German-American Notes.

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    Exchange ôf German-American Notes.

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    Exchange of German-American Notes.

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    Exchange of German-American Notes.

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    Exchange of German-American Notes.

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    Exchange of German-American Notes.

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    Italy's Betrayal of her Allies. 393

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    Italy's Betrayal of her Allies. 395

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    Italy's Betrayal of her Allies. 397

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    CHAPTER XXXII. A Final Political Su

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    A Final Political Survey. 401 arran

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    A Final Political Survey. 403 For t

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    A Final Political Survey. 405 This