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474 Making Tables Figure

474 Making Tables Figure 1-4: The and tags define new rows and data for a table. Displaying a table caption, header, and footer If you want to create a caption to appear above your table, you can use the and tags. Captions can be useful to name or describe the data stored inside the table. Tables can also store a header and footer. The header typically appears as the first row of the table whereas the footer typically appears as the last row of the table. To define a table header and footer, you need to use the and tags, respectively. The following code produces the results shown in Figure 1-5: This text appears in the title bar. This is a table caption. This is a table header

Making Tables 475 Column 1 Column 2 Stuff here Useful data Second row More data This is a table footer Book V Chapter 1 HyperText Markup Language Figure 1-5: The and tags define text to appear over a table.

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    Beginning Programming ALL-IN-ONE DE

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    Beginning Programming ALL-IN-ONE DE

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    About the Author I started off as a

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    Acknowledgments This is the part of

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    Contents at a Glance Introduction .

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    Table of Contents Introduction.....

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    Table of Contents xi Finding an Int

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    Table of Contents xiii Playing with

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    Table of Contents xv Using Structur

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    Table of Contents xvii Searching wi

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    Table of Contents xix Book VI: Prog

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    Table of Contents xxi Declaring Con

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    Introduction If you enjoy using a c

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    How to Use This Book 3 means they

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    Book I Getting Started

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    Chapter 1: Getting Started Programm

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    How Computer Programming Works 9 De

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    The History of Computer Programming

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    The History of Computer Programming

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    The History of Computer Programming

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    Figuring Out Programming 17 As a ge

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    Figuring Out Programming 19 ✦ Lin

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    Figuring Out Programming 21 Convert

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    Figuring Out Programming 23 certain

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    Getting Started with Programming 25

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    Knowing Programming versus Knowing

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    Chapter 2: Different Methods for Wr

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    Spaghetti Programming without a Pla

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    Planning Ahead with Structured Prog

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    Planning Ahead with Structured Prog

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    Planning Ahead with Structured Prog

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    Making User Interfaces with Event-D

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    Making User Interfaces with Event-D

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    Organizing a Program with Object-Or

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    Organizing a Program with Object-Or

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    Organizing a Program with Object-Or

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    Chapter 3: Types of Programming Lan

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    Choosing Your First Language 51 ext

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    Teaching Languages 53 Principles Be

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    Teaching Languages 55 The Interacti

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    Teaching Languages 57 near future.

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    Teaching Languages 59 The main disa

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    Teaching Languages 61 Book I Chapte

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    “Curly Bracket” Languages 63

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    “Curly Bracket” Languages 65 Th

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    “Curly Bracket” Languages 67 C#

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    “Curly Bracket” Languages 69 Vi

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    Artificial Intelligence Languages 7

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    Scripting Languages 73 2. From the

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    Scripting Languages 75 In compariso

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    Scripting Languages 77 Transferring

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    Database Programming Languages 79 @

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    Comparing Programming Languages 81

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    Chapter 4: Programming Tools In Thi

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    Choosing a Compiler 85 3. Choose a

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    Choosing a Compiler 87 than other c

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    Choosing a Compiler 89 With a cross

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    Finding an Interpreter 91 In the ol

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    Compiling to a Virtual Machine 93 C

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    Writing a Program with an Editor 95

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    Fixing a Program with a Debugger 97

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    Fixing a Program with a Debugger 99

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    Fixing a Program with a Debugger 10

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    Creating a Help File 103 Obviously,

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    Dissecting Programs with a Disassem

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    Chapter 5: Managing Large Projects

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    Software Engineering Methods 109 Fi

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    Software Engineering Methods 111 de

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    Software Engineering Methods 113 Ad

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    Automating Software Engineering wit

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    Automating Software Engineering wit

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    Automating Software Engineering wit

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    Automating Software Engineering wit

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    The Pros and Cons of Software Engin

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    Book II Programming Basics

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    Chapter 1: How Programs Work In Thi

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    Using Keywords as Building Blocks 1

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    Organizing a Program 131 So if your

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    Dividing a Program into Subprograms

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    Dividing a Program into Objects 135

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    Dividing a Program into Objects 137

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    Creating a User Interface 139 The u

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    Chapter 2: Variables, Data Types, a

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    Declaring Variables 143 This BASIC

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    Declaring Variables 145 You can alw

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    Declaring Variables 147 Every progr

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    Using Different Data Types 149 type

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    Retrieving Data from a Variable 151

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    Using Constant Values 153 Using Con

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    Defining the Scope of a Variable 15

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    Defining the Scope of a Variable 15

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    Defining the Scope of a Variable 15

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    Chapter 3: Manipulating Data In Thi

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    Using Math to Manipulate Numbers 16

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    Using Math to Manipulate Numbers 16

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    Manipulating Strings 167 Most progr

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    Finding Strings with Regular Expres

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    Finding Strings with Regular Expres

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    Using Comparison Operators 173 Comp

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    Using Boolean Operators 175 Most pr

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    Using Boolean Operators 177 So if t

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    Converting Data Types 179 Both type

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    Chapter 4: Making Decisions by Bran

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    Picking One Choice with the IF-THEN

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    Picking Three or More Choices with

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    Picking Three or More Choices with

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    Playing with Multiple Boolean Opera

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    Making Multiple Choices with the SE

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    Making Multiple Choices with the SE

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    Making Multiple Choices with the SE

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    Making Multiple Choices with the SE

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    Chapter 5: Repeating Commands by Lo

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    Looping a Fixed Number of Times wit

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    Looping a Fixed Number of Times wit

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    Looping a Fixed Number of Times wit

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    Looping Zero or More Times with the

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    Playing with Nested Loops 209 This

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    Checking Your Loops 211 Outer loop

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    Chapter 6: Breaking a Large Program

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    Creating and Using Subprograms 215

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    Creating and Using Subprograms 217

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    Passing Parameters 219 The #include

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    Passing Parameters 221 Figure 6-5:

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    Passing Parameters 223 When you pas

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    Passing Parameters 225 DIM Temp AS

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    Repeating a Subprogram with Recursi

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    Repeating a Subprogram with Recursi

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    Chapter 7: Breaking a Large Program

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    How Object-Oriented Programming Wor

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    Encapsulation Isolates Data and Sub

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    Encapsulation Isolates Data and Sub

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    Sharing Code with Inheritance 239 S

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    Sharing Code with Inheritance 241 F

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    Design Patterns 243 However, when y

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    Design Patterns 245 The flyweight p

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    Object-Oriented Languages 247 Becau

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    Real-Life Programming Examples 249

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    Real-Life Programming Examples 251

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    Real-Life Programming Examples 253

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    Real-Life Programming Examples 255

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    Real-Life Programming Examples 257

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    Chapter 8: Reading and Saving Files

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    Storing Data in Text Files 261 A co

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    Storing Data in Text Files 263 Read

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    Storing Fixed Size Data in Random-A

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    Storing Fixed Size Data in Random-A

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    Storing Varying Size Data in Untype

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    Using Database Files 271 Figure 8-5

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    Using Database Files 273 Think of a

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    Using Database Files 275 When using

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    Chapter 9: Documenting Your Program

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    Adding Comments to Source Code 279

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    Adding Comments to Source Code 281

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    Adding Comments to Source Code 283

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    Writing Software Documentation 285

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    Writing Software Documentation 287

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    Chapter 10: Principles of User Inte

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    The Evolution of User Interfaces 29

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    Elements of a User Interface 293 GU

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    Elements of a User Interface 295 Fi

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    Elements of a User Interface 297 If

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    Elements of a User Interface 299 Fi

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    Elements of a User Interface 301 Fi

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    Designing a User Interface 303 diff

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    Designing a User Interface 305 A we

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    Designing a User Interface 307 Figu

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    Book III Data Structures

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    Chapter 1: Structures and Arrays In

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    Using Structures 313 If you wanted

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    Using an Array 315 the array, which

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    Using an Array 317 Perkins has empl

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    Working with Resizable Arrays 319 D

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    Working with Multi-Dimensional Arra

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    Using Structures with Arrays 323 Th

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    Drawbacks of Arrays 325 To store da

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    Drawbacks of Arrays 327 Suppose you

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    Chapter 2: Sets and Linked Lists In

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    Using Sets 331 Adding (and deleting

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    Using Sets 333 This command asks th

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    Using Sets 335 Bill Evans John Doe

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    Using Linked Lists 337 This tells t

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    Using Linked Lists 339 Each time yo

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    Drawbacks of Sets and Linked Lists

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    Drawbacks of Sets and Linked Lists

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    Chapter 3: Collections and Dictiona

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    Using a Collection 347 Every elemen

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    Using a Collection 349 When you del

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    Using a Collection 351 Figure 3-6:

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    Understanding Hash Tables 353 Every

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    Understanding Hash Tables 355 VP Ke

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    Understanding Hash Tables 357 ✦ D

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    Understanding Hash Tables 359 In ge

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    Chapter 4: Stacks, Queues, and Dequ

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    Using a Stack 363 Like a collection

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    Using Queues 365 Counting and searc

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    Using Queues 367 Adding data to a q

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    Using Queues 369 Figure 4-6: The Pe

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    Using Deques 371 Initially, a deque

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    Using Deques 373 Figure 4-11: The U

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    Chapter 5: Graphs and Trees In This

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    Understanding Graphs 377 457 miles

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    Understanding Graphs 379 Figure 5-4

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    Creating Trees 381 Figure 5-5: A tr

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    Creating Trees 383 For example, an

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    Taking Action on Trees 385 Traversi

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    Taking Action on Trees 387 10 8 12

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    Taking Action on Trees 389 10 8 12

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    Book IV Algorithms

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    Chapter 1: Sorting Algorithms In Th

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    Using Bubble Sort 395 32 9 74 21 Or

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    Using Insertion Sort 397 32 9 74 21

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    Using Shell Sort 399 32 9 74 21 50

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    Using Heap Sort 401 Heap sort dumps

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    Using Merge Sort 403 94 46 74 21 32

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    Using Quick Sort 405 Using Quick So

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    Comparing Sorting Algorithms 407 If

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    Chapter 2: Searching Algorithms In

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    Sequential Search 411 Backward or f

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    Sequential Search 413 Binary search

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    Sequential Search 415 Fibonacci num

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    Using Indexes 417 102 John Smith 55

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    Adversarial Search 419 The more lev

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    Adversarial Search 421 So if the co

  • Page 447 and 448: Chapter 3: String Searching In This
  • Page 449 and 450: Sequential Text Search 425 In this
  • Page 451 and 452: Sequential Text Search 427 The Shif
  • Page 453 and 454: Searching with Regular Expressions
  • Page 455 and 456: Searching Phonetically 431 Both sym
  • Page 457 and 458: Searching Phonetically 433 If you h
  • Page 459 and 460: Chapter 4: Data Compression Algorit
  • Page 461 and 462: Lossless Data Compression Algorithm
  • Page 463 and 464: Lossless Data Compression Algorithm
  • Page 465 and 466: Lossless Data Compression Algorithm
  • Page 467 and 468: Lossy Data Compression 443 Basicall
  • Page 469 and 470: Chapter 5: Encryption Algorithms In
  • Page 471 and 472: The Basics of Encryption 447 in a m
  • Page 473 and 474: The Basics of Encryption 449 Stream
  • Page 475 and 476: The Basics of Encryption 451 Electr
  • Page 477 and 478: Symmetric/Asymmetric Encryption Alg
  • Page 479 and 480: Cracking Encryption 455 Sender’s
  • Page 481 and 482: Cracking Encryption 457 Instead of
  • Page 483 and 484: Cracking Encryption 459 Code cracki
  • Page 485 and 486: Book V Web Programming
  • Page 487 and 488: Chapter 1: HyperText Markup Languag
  • Page 489 and 490: The Structure of an HTML Document 4
  • Page 491 and 492: The Structure of an HTML Document 4
  • Page 493 and 494: Defining the Background 469 Adding
  • Page 495 and 496: Making Tables 471 The anchor point
  • Page 497: Making Tables 473 Book V Chapter 1
  • Page 501 and 502: Chapter 2: CSS In This Chapter Und
  • Page 503 and 504: Creating Style Classes 479 color :
  • Page 505 and 506: Separating Styles in Files 481 Sepa
  • Page 507 and 508: Cascading Stylesheets 483 If you ha
  • Page 509 and 510: Chapter 3: JavaScript In This Chapt
  • Page 511 and 512: Declaring Variables 487 need to def
  • Page 513 and 514: Using Operators 489 The relational
  • Page 515 and 516: Branching Statements 491 To make th
  • Page 517 and 518: Using Arrays 493 A variation of the
  • Page 519 and 520: Designing User Interfaces 495 A con
  • Page 521 and 522: Chapter 4: PHP In This Chapter Und
  • Page 523 and 524: Declaring Variables 499 Declaring V
  • Page 525 and 526: Using Operators 501 Table 4-3 Logic
  • Page 527 and 528: Branching Statements 503 Command; }
  • Page 529 and 530: Creating Functions 505 If you don
  • Page 531 and 532: Creating Objects 507 Creating Objec
  • Page 533 and 534: Chapter 5: Ruby In This Chapter Un
  • Page 535 and 536: Using Operators 511 # long time to
  • Page 537 and 538: Using Operators 513 Table 5-3 Logic
  • Page 539 and 540: Looping Statements 515 Command else
  • Page 541 and 542: Using Data Structures 517 Using Dat
  • Page 543 and 544: Creating Objects 519 To tell an obj
  • Page 545 and 546: Book VI Programming Language Syntax
  • Page 547 and 548: Chapter 1: C and C++ In This Chapte
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    Declaring Variables 525 Despite min

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    Declaring Variables 527 All integer

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    Using Operators 529 Relational oper

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    Branching Statements 531 Table 1-6

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    Looping Statements 533 switch (expr

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    Data Structures 535 If a function d

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    Using Objects 537 Now you can decla

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    Using Objects 539 To inherit from m

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    Chapter 2: Java and C# In This Chap

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    Declaring Variables 543 The double

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    Using Operators 545 Declaring float

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    Using Operators 547 The increment o

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    Branching Statements 549 if (condit

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    Looping Statements 551 Because no b

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    Data Structures 553 If the function

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    Data Structures 555 You can create

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    Using Objects 557 So if you created

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    Chapter 3: Perl and Python In This

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    Using Operators 561 You can write b

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    Using Operators 563 The relational

  • Page 589 and 590:

    Branching Statements 565 Table 3-5

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    Looping Statements 567 In Python, t

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    Perl Data Structures 569 A typical

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    Python Data Structures 571 Creating

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    Using Objects 573 After you define

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    Chapter 4: Pascal and Delphi In Thi

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    Declaring Variables 577 Creating Co

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    Declaring Constants 579 Declaring d

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    Branching Statements 581 Table 4-5

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    Looping Statements 583 Looping Stat

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    Data Structures 585 FUNCTION Functi

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    Creating Objects 587 clear a dynami

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    Chapter 5: Visual Basic and REALbas

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    The Structure of a BASIC Program 59

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    Declaring Variables 593 Declaring i

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    Declaring Constants 595 Declaring B

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    Branching Statements 597 Table 5-7

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    Branching Statements 599 The preced

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    Creating Subprograms and Functions

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    Data Structures 603 Data Structures

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    Creating Objects 605 Creating Objec

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    Book VII Applications

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    Chapter 1: Database Management In T

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    The Basics of Databases 611 To retr

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    The Basics of Databases 613 Althoug

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    The Basics of Databases 615 Employe

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    Manipulating Data 617 Tables divide

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    Manipulating Data 619 The Join comm

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    Manipulating Data 621 SET PhoneNumb

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    Database Programming 623 Figure 1-1

  • Page 649 and 650:

    Chapter 2: Bioinformatics In This C

  • Page 651 and 652:

    The Basics of Bioinformatics 627 Un

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    Searching Databases 629 ✦ Swiss-P

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    Bioinformatics Programming 631 Alth

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    Chapter 3: Computer Security In Thi

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    Stopping Malware 635 Worms Similar

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    Stopping Hackers 637 Stopping Hacke

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    Secure Computing 639 Forensics If y

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    Secure Computing 641 start. The ide

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    Chapter 4: Artificial Intelligence

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    Problem Solving 645 Game-playing Be

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    Problem Solving 647 Expert System K

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    Problem Solving 649 Humans can unde

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    Problem Solving 651 Such speech rec

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    Machine Learning 653 With LISP, eve

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    Machine Learning 655 Robotics and a

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    `Chapter 5: The Future of Computer

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    Picking an Operating System 659 opt

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    Cross-Platform Programming 661 Unfo

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    Cross-Platform Programming 663 The

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    Cross-Platform Programming 665 Anot

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    The Programming Language of the Fut

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    The Programming Language of the Fut

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    Index Numerics 0 (zero) initializin

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    Index 673 blocks of commands in cur

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    Index 675 dictionaries versus, 352

  • Page 701 and 702:

    Index 677 database management conne

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    Index 679 enumerated variables (C/C

  • Page 705 and 706:

    Index 681 hybrid OOP languages, 246

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    Index 683 knowledge base, 646, 647

  • Page 709 and 710:

    Index 685 modeling, 44-45 Modula-2

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    Index 687 advantages and disadvanta

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    Index 689 looping statements, 600-6

  • Page 715 and 716:

    Index 691 extreme programming metho

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    Index 693 source code as, 264 tab-d

  • Page 719 and 720:

    Index 695 as event-driven programmi

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    BUSINESS, CAREERS & PERSONAL FINANC

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