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"Sieh da! Sieh da, Timotheus,

Die KranichedesIbykus!"

Es ist nichtdraussen,dasucht esder Tor,

Es ist in dir, du bringstes ewig hervor.*

The Secret Knowledge

of Friedrich

Schiller

I

by Helga Zepp LaRouche

nyone who writes about Friedrich Schiller must begin

invoking the words Beethoven had intended for the

opening recitative of his Ninth Symphony: "Let us sing

the song of the immortal Schiller." Nothing could be more

appropriate to celebrate the memory of Schiller than Beethoven's

setting of the "Ode to Joy" a composition which the greatest

musician mankind has yet produced grappled with all his life, until

finally unfolding it with supreme mastery in his last symphony.

Indeed, before even picking up our pen we experience a moment

of reverence and exultation in encompassing the colossal achievement

of Schiller, this passionate teacher of humanity, this great,

beautiful soul. His memory awakens a "state of greatest calm and

greatest motion, engendering that fundamental emotion of which

the understanding has no concept and languages no name." For

Schiller casts a spark into our souls that time's passage can never

extinguish.

Friedrich Schiller, the German poet, ranks among those great

geniuses who have enabled humanity to stand today on-_the

threshold of the age of reason, having waged a never-ending battle

in which Schiller fought with his own characteristic furor poeticus.

He was a creative genius; moreover, historically, he was the thinker

who most consciously and explicitly worked toward educating all

mankind to be geniuses, to achieve the method by which it would

eventually be possible to educate every single human being to be a

genius.

Schiller not "only appropriated the innermost secrets of the

Neoplatonic elite, but as is the character of genius he advanced

*" 'Look! Look there, Timotheus, / There are the cranesoflbykus!' " (From Schiller's "Die Kraniche

des Ibykus.") "It's not outside, only fools seek it there; / It is within you, you eternally create it."

(From Schiller's "Die Worte desWahns.")

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