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Boxoffice-January.24.1953

BOXOFFICE BAROMETER This

BOXOFFICE BAROMETER This chort records the performonce of current attractions in the opening week of their first runs in the 20 key cities checked Pictures with fewer than five engagements ore not listed. As new runs ore reported, rotings ore odded and overages revised. Computation is in terms of percentage in relation to normal grosses as determined by the theatre managers With 100 per cent as "normal." the figures show the gross rating above or below that mork. i A A; ( M«-.-t Captain Kidd iWB' 90 90 95 105 135 75 115 140 -I £ 110 95 < > < 75 90 90 100 April in Paris (WB) 121 175 105 150 135 150 100 185 130 140 140 140 90 165 145 200 175 190 146 Blackboard the Pirate (RKO) 140 140 110 130 75 70 100 125 100 140 115 80 115 Blazing: Forest, The (Para) 96 100 90 95 100 75 100 80 95 100 95 60 100 110 90 111 91 Bloodhounds of Broadway (20th-Fox) 100 90 100 100 75 100 90 90 110 100 75 110 95 140 60 120 100 97 Captive Women (RKO) 100 100 90 90 100 90 100 96 Cattle Town (WB) 60 85 105 85 120 90 100 85 75 60 40 85 83 Clouded Yellow, The (Col) 100 80 90 100 100 60 88 Clown, The (MGM) 95 110 105 140 160 120 122 Desperate Search (MGM) 90 100 100 100 100 100 98 Fargo (AA) 100 100 95 100 90 75 100 94 Four Poster, The (Col) 108 125 90 300 125 150 Happy Time, The (Col) 100 85 125 100 75 105 115 85 125 220 90 111 Hour of 13, The (MGM) 85 110 100 100 100 85 95 115 100 105 95 100 100 100 99 Hurricane Smith (Para) 80 120 100 100 90 75 75 100 100 90 60 110 95 70 100 90 91 Iron Mistress, The (WB) 140 130 120 105 145 90 200 100 115 140 110 110 120 110 120 120 100 150 150 125 Kansas City Confidential (UA) 95 105 150 90 110 140 115 190 124 Last Train From Bombay (Col) 100 100 100 85 100 100 100 90 90 95 85 86 94 Limelight (UA) 85 125 150 250 200 125 156 Million Dollar Mermaid (MGM) 140 180 125 120 140 100 135 160 150 175 160 125 140 140 125 105 150 139 Montana Belle (RKO) 110 125 90 90 120 100 110 100 75 115 70 45 80 100 100 95 Montana Territory (Col) 100 100 100 95 65 100 80 95 100 85 85 100 35 50 75 84 Mr. Walkie Talkie (LP) 100 100 95 70 100 80 100 92 My Cousin Rachel (20th-Fox) 120 125 90 125 175 150 80 120 123 No Holds Barred (AA) 100 100 70 90 100 100 100 94 Operation Secret (WB) 120 95 105 100 125 75 90 95 70 125 100 85 70 120 95 120 75 110 95 98 Outlaw Women (LP) 75 85 100 90 100 85 100 85 80 100 100 100 65 115 91 Outpost in Malaya (UA) 70 90 100 100 65 80 90 85 100 90 70 105 70 75 95 86 Pony Soldier (20th-Fox) 125 125 115 115 80 150 85 90 85 90 95 120 100 85 100 110 150 107 Promoter, The (U-I) 114 350 105 200 80 220 400 175 200 135 198 Ring, The (UA) 100 90 65 250 100 100 125 90 140 80 114 Road to Bali (Para) 130 200 150 125 165 195 150 150 100 245 190 190 150 120 80 175 225 161 Ruby Gentry (20th-Fox) 125 125 125 105 90 200 125 120 120 126 Savage, The (Para) 102 115 105 105 100 80 70 80 80 100 100 90 80 115 95 70 75 100 92 Something for the Birds (20th-Pox) 100 70 100 70 65 100 90 65 90 90 95 75 105 100 65 60 84 Spider and the Fly, The (Bell) 100 100 100 100 100 100 Stars and Stripes Forever (20th-Pox) 125 110 130 125 90 150 125 110 200 140 95 110 175 125 105 120 120 126 Stop, You're Killing Me (WB) 105 75 100 90 110 96 Target—Hong Kong (Col) 80 95 75 100 90 100 100 100 93 Turning Point, The (Para) 109 95 90 100 110 75 85 100 110 90 70 110 105 100 55 100 90 94 Young and the Damned. The (M-Ki 105 85 100 115 85 98 i TOP THE OF HITS WEEK Individual runs, not an average. Pictures with leis than five runs do not appear in the chart above. 1. April in Paris (WB) Pittsburgh 200 Seattle 190 Ruby Gentry (20th-Fox) Detroit ..200 Kansas City Confiidential (UA) San Francisco 190 Million Dollar Mermaid (MGM) Buffalo 180 Kansas City 175 Jazz Singer, The (WB) Los Angeles 175 Rood to Bali (Poro) Cincinnati 165 New Haven 150

CHESTER FRIEDMAN EDITOR OXOfflW HUGH E. FRAZE Associalo Editor SECTION PRACTICAL IDEAS FOR SELLING SEATS BY PRACTICAL SHOWMEN Canning Plant and Food Markets In LA Area Aid 'Bali' Promotion A three-way tieup between seven California theatres playing day-and-date engagements of "Road to Bali." the distributor of Star Kist Tuna and Von's supermarkets was arranged by Paramount pictures exploiteers. with help from the local theatremen who participated in the tieup. The tie-in gimmick was a simple contest, sponsored by the canning company, in 19 supermarkets in the area. Shoppers who purchased a can of Star Kist Tuna during the 12-day period just prior to the opening of the picture were invited to write their name and address on the label and deposit it in a container which was .set up at each store. Three winners were selected in each store, all of whom received authentic replicas of Dorothy Lamour sarongs, dinner for two at the Brown Derby restaurant, and tickets for the opening of "Road to Bali." Huge window streamers and interior displays advertised the contest at the 19 supermarkets. The displays featured lifesize blowups of Lamour and models appearing in the film. In addition, the picture was advertised heavily in full-page newspaper ads paid for by the stores. The ads appeared in leading metropolitan newspapers and 15 suburban dailies with an estimated circulation of almost 2,000,000. Theatremen who participated in the tieup were Howard Williams, Orpheum, Los Angeles; Jack Gageby, Paramount. Hollywood; Jim Haines. Pickwood. Santa Monica; Rube Wolf, Manchester, Inglewood; William Ktasky, Gage Drive-In, Huntington Park; Jack Carver, El Monte Drive-In, Pasadena, and Gene Charlotte, Van Nuys Drive-In, Glendale. Dimes and dollars will help many a to recover normal heolth. Arrange Dimes collections. victim of polio for March of Civil Defense Tieups Plus Army Support Break 'Barrier' A series ot special promotions with the army air force recruiting service proved invaluable in getting extra publicity for "Breaking the Sound Barrier" at the State Theatre in Houston. Tex. The local campaign was handled by Homer McCallon, manager of the State, and H. M. Addison, UA exploiteer. The campaign was launched with a screening for top army personnel and civil defense officials. Army A-boards throughout the city were posted with picture and theatre adverti ing three weeks prior to opening. A large display was set up at Ellington air base, and civil defense officials made available a $10,000 truck with revolving searchlights for a street ballyhoo. Twenty-four sheets were posted and 14x36 lobby cards were displayed in downtown hotels. In the theatre lobby, a broadcasting station was set up by the army, from which the wives ot servicemen could speak to their husbands in Korea. Radio plugs were garnered on station KTHT, KTRH and KATL. A candid camera street photographer passed out dodgers and window displays were ai-ranged in hobby shops beauty salons and the chain of 18 Madings drug stores Local soda fountains featured a jet-propelled sundae. Four co-op ads were promoted. During the run, a recording of a jet plane take-off blast was amplified over the theatre public address system facing the street. C^mpioue tpiou ^ncenti Last week, graduates who completed the AMPA course in showmanship received their diplomas at a luncheon in New York. Walter Reade jr. was the guest speaker. Reade is head of the circuit bearing the name of his father and founder. His theatres are in New York and New Jersey. During his speech, Mr. Reade made several pointed observations which no doubt will raise eyebrows in certain quarters. His comments indicate that as a second generation exhibitor he has vision, foresight and the courage to speak his mind. Said Mr. Reade: "There are many veteran managers and advertising people leaving our business every day because there are greater incentives elsewhere. "It is not enough to give basic and refresher courses to our young people; we must indoctrinate them with the opportunities in our business and demonstrate what those opportunities are." A bit more cautiously, Mr. Reade declared, "We do not have to raise salaries to do this, but we must provide methods whereby employes can benefit from these opportunities." Here the speaker patted his rear pants pocket with the obvious inference that exhibitors have to shell out, in one way or another, with money. Several times in the past two years, we have stated in print what Mr. Reade told the graduates, guests and members of AMP.4 verbally. It is heartening to see a champion arise among circuit owners who believes managers and show advertising people should receive recompense commensurate with ability rather than a scanty living wage. Reports reaching our desk from theatremen in the field indicate that a few circuits have already acted to give managers a greater incentive to remain in the business and to prosper with the theatre. Let us hope Mr. Reade's speech will give added stimulus to make the movement universal. — Chester Friedman BOXOmCE Showmandiser Jan. 24, 1953 — 17 29