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Brasil só deve dominar Leitura em 260 anos, aponta estudo do Banco Mundial Relatorio Banco Mundial _Learning

xvi | ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

xvi | ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Ousmane Dione, Safaa El Tayeb El-Kogali, Marianne Fay, María Marta Ferreyra, Carina Fonseca, Marie Gaarder, Roberta Gatti, Ejaz Syed Ghani, Elena Glinskaya, Markus Goldstein, Melinda Good, David Gould, Sangeeta Goyal, Caren Grown, Keith Hansen, Amer Hasan, Caroline Heider, Katia Herrera, Niels Holm-Nielsen, Dingyong Hou, Elena Ianchovichina, Keiko Inoue, Sandeep Jain, Omer Karasapan, Michel Kerf, Asmeen Khan, Igor Kheyfets, Youssouf Kiendrebeogo, Daniel John Kirkwood, Eva Kloeve, Markus Kostner, Daniel Lederman, Hans Lofgren, Gladys López-Acevedo, Javier Luque, Michael Mahrt, Francisco Mar molejo, Kris McDonall, Mahmoud Mohieldin, Lili Mottaghi, Mary Mulusa, Yoko Nakashima, Shiro Nakata, Muthoni Ngatia, Shinsaku Nomura, Dorota Agata Nowak, Michael O’Sullivan, Arunma Oteh, Aris Panou, Georgi Panterov, Suhas Parandekar, Harry Patrinos, Dhushyanth Raju, Martín Rama, Sheila Redzepi, Lea Marie Rouanet, Jaime Saavedra, Hafida Sahraoui, Sajjad Shah, Sudhir Shetty, Mari Shojo, Lars Sondergaard, Nikola Spatafora, Venkatesh Sundararaman, Janssen Teixeira, Jeff Thindwe, Hans Timmer, Yvonne Tsikata, Laura Tuck, Anuja Utz, Julia Valliant, Axel van Trotsenburg, Carlos Vegh, Binh Thanh Vu, Jan Walliser, Jason Weaver, Michel Welmond, Deborah Wetzel, Christina Wood, and Hanspeter Wyss. The team apologizes to any individuals or organizations inadvertently omitted from this list and expresses its gratitude to all who contributed to this Report, including those whose names may not appear here. The team members would also like to thank their families for their support throughout the preparation of this Report. And finally, the team members thank the many children and youth who have inspired them through interactions in classrooms around the world over the years—as well as the many others whose great potential has motivated this Report. The World Development Report 2018 is dedicated to them.

Abbreviations A4L ASER BRN CAMPE CCT CSEF DISE EGRA GDP GNECC I-BEST ICT IDEB LLECE MDG MENA NAFTA NGO OECD PASEC PIAAC PIRLS PISA PPP SACMEQ SAR SAT SDG SIMCE SNED SNTE TERCE TIMSS TVET UNESCO UNRWA USAID WHO WIDE Assessment for Learning Annual Status of Education Report Big Results Now in Education (Tanzania) Campaign for Popular Education (Bangladesh) conditional cash transfer Civil Society Education Fund District Information System for Education (India) Early Grade Reading Assessment gross domestic product Ghana National Education Campaign Coalition Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training information and communication technology Índice de Desenvolvimento da Educação Básica (Index of Basic Education Development, Brazil) Latin American Laboratory for Assessment of the Quality of Education Millennium Development Goal Middle East and North Africa North American Free Trade Agreement nongovernmental organization Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Programme d’Analyse des Systèmes Éducatifs de la Confemen (Programme for the Analysis of Education Systems) Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies Progress in International Reading Literacy Study Programme for International Student Assessment purchasing power parity Southern and Eastern Africa Consortium for Monitoring Educational Quality special administrative region Scholastic Aptitude Test Sustainable Development Goal Sistema de Medición de la Calidad de la Educación (Education Quality Measurement System, Chile) Sistema Nacional de Evaluación de Desempeño (National Performance Evaluation System, Chile) Sindicato Nacional de Trabajadores de la Educación (National Union of Educational Workers, Mexico) Third Regional Comparative and Explanatory Study Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study technical and vocational education and training United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization United Nations Relief and Works Agency U.S. Agency for International Development World Health Organization World Inequality Database on Education xvii

  • Page 6 and 7: © 2018 International Bank for Reco
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    Box 1.3 Comparing attainment across

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    74. For OECD countries, see Heckman

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    12757, National Bureau of Economic

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    2 Thegreatschooling expansion—and

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    Figure 2.3 Nationalincomeis correla

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    Box 2.1 Accessdenied:Theeffectsoffr

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    their brightest child to secondary

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    Hanushek, Eric A., and Ludger Woess

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    SPOTLIGHT1 Thebiologyoflearning Res

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    outcomes. Finally, intense stress o

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    Figure 3.1 Mostgrade6studentsinWest

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    Box 3.1 Thosewhocan’treadbytheend

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    Figure 3.4 Learningoutcomesvarygrea

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    meeting global development goals wi

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    language and cognitive abilities ar

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    Box 3.3 Teachersmayperceiveloweffor

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    13. UNESCO (2015). 14. Filmer, Hasa

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    Learning Community of Practice.”

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    SPOTLIGHT2 Povertyhindersbiological

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    early childhood interventions that

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    particularly true in low-income cou

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    In such contexts, learning metrics

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    Learning assessments of key foundat

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    technical challenges. 54 Ex ante li

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    Heckman, James J., Rodrigo Pinto, a

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    SPOTLIGHT3 Themultidimensionality o

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    Notes 1. Schönfeld (2017). 2. For

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    SPOTLIGHT 4 Learning about learning

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    changes in school leadership, schoo

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    5 There is no learning without prep

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    FIGURE 5.1 It pays to invest in hig

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    etter cognitive development, more p

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    Box 5.2 Communities can leverage th

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    Box 5.3 Providing information on ch

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    sometimes mattering more than the e

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    and above and indicates the ability

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    Carneiro, Pedro, Flavio Cunha, and

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    from Poor Rural Areas Go to High Sc

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    ————. 2017. World Developme

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    Table 6.1 Models of human behavior

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    Figure 6.1 Only a small fraction of

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    Box 6.3 Reaching learners in their

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    comparable, suggesting similarly la

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    19. He, Linden, and MacLeod (2008,

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    Harris-Van Keuren, Christine, and I

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    Yoon, Kwang Suk, Teresa Duncan, Sil

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    Table 7.1 Models of human behavior

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    girls. Even beyond building entire

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    Pradesh, India, providing community

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    from a Randomized Experiment in Ecu

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    8 Build on foundations by linking s

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    on their effectiveness is scant. Ev

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    or nonprofits with industry-specifi

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    16. Aubery, Giles, and Sahn (2017).

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    Fares, Jean, and Olga Susana Puerto

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    SPOTLIGHT 5 Technology is changing

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    All of those skills that help indiv

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    PART IV Making the system work for

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    aligned with the overall goal of le

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    many countries they do not routinel

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    thinking, the curriculum alone will

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    Box 9.3 Can private schooling be al

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    financial support in anticipation o

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    Institute for Educational Planning,

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    SPOTLIGHT 6 Spending more or spendi

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    Figure S6.2 The relationship betwee

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    public investment. A central elemen

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    10 Unhealthy politics drives misali

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    Figure 10.1 Contradictory interests

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    Box 10.2 How politics can derail le

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    Trapped in low-accountability, low-

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    Educational Research and Innovation

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    11 How to escape low-learning traps

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    Box 11.1 Using information to align

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    on learning can strengthen incentiv

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    Box 11.4 Using “labs” to build

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    education systems effectively requi

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    Box 11.7 Burundi improved education

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    shift aligned funding with new real

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    Notes 1. Cassen, McNally, and Vigno

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    Working Paper 21825, National Burea

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