Boxoffice-May.12.156

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. . . Raymond

. . Another

. . Mrs.

. . "Cockleshell

. . John

. . Agnes

. .

, . . Naomi

'Stover' and 'Fall' Get

Top Scores in L. A.

LOS ANGELES—Each recording a substantial

150 per cent, "The Revolt of Mamie

Stover" and "The Harder They Fall" proved

the week's strongest opening fii-st run attractions

during a period which found business

generally only tolerable.

(Average Is 100)

in Man the Gray Flannel Chinese The Suit

(20th-Fox), 3rd wk 140

Egyptian, United Artists Oklahomal (Magna),

24tti wk

El Rey— Doctor ot Sea (Rep), 5th wk

125

60

Fine Arts— Patterns (UA), 6th wk 50

Star Four Goby (MGM), 5th wk 90

Fox Wilshire Alexander the Greot 70

(UA), 6th wk.

Hawaii, State Tribute to a Bod Men (MGM). . . I 20

Hillstreet, Vogue The Bold ond the Brave (RKO);.

The Way Out (RKO), 2nd wk 90

Los Angeles, Fox, Ritz, Loyola The Revolt of

Mamie Stover (20th-Fox), The Broken Star (UA), 150

Orpheum, Ins Cockleshell Heroes (Col); Blackjack

Ketchum, Desperado iCol), 2nd wk 100

Pontages, Downtown Paromount, Worners Wilfern

—Serenade (WB), A Day of Fury (U-l) 125

Paramount Hollywood The Birds and the Bees

(Para), 2nd wk 125

(Col), 1 1 th Warners Beverly- Picnic wk 75

Warners Downtown, Fox Hollywood, Uptown

The Harder They Fall (Col); Star in the Dust

lU-l) 150

Warners Hollywood Cinerama Holidoy (Cinerama),

25th wk 130

"Forbidden Planet' Soars

To 155 in Denver Debut

DENVER—Business among the first runs

was generally off and for the first time since

Christmas nothing was held over. Best

grossers were "Forbidden Planet" with "Bride

of the Monster" at the Orpheum and "Miracle

in the Rain" with "Steel Jungle" at the

Paramount.

Aladdin Gaby (MGM) 100

Centre Hilda Crone ;20th-Fox), 2nd wk 85

Denham Glory (RKO) 80

Denver The Maverick Queen (Rep); The Yearling

(MGM), reissue 90

Esquire Samurai 120

(Jocon)

Orpheum Forbidden Planet (MGM); Bride of the

Monster (Realart) 155

Paramount Miracle in the Rain (WB); The Steel

Jungle !WB) 115

Vogue Letters From My Windmill (Tohan), 2nd

wk 100

Tail' and 'Gray Flannel'

Are Frisco Top Grossers

SAN FRANCISCO—Two first run houses

walked away with slightly better than average

grosses to take top honors. The opening

of "The Harder They Fall" at the Paramount

and the third week of "The Man in the Gray

Flannel Suit" at the Fox were the leaders.

Fox—The Man In the Gray Flonnel Suit (20th-Fox),

3rd wk 125

Golden Gate Come Next Spring (Rep); When

Gangland Strikes (Rep) 60

Paramount The Harder They Foil (Col); Over-

Exposed (Col) 125

Francis—Miracle 90

St, in the Roin (WB)

United Artists—World Without End (AA); Indestructible

Man (AA) 90

Worfield The Swan (MGM), 110

2nd wk

'Planet' Grosses Good

170 at Portland

PORTLAND — "Forbidden Planet," the

science-fiction drama, scored 170 per cent at

the Broadway.

Broadway— Forbidden Planet (MGM) 1 70

Fox—Serenade (WB) 1 20

Guild Samurai (Jacon) I 50

Liberty Hot Blood (Col) MO

Orpheum The Horder They Foil ICol) 135

Paramount-One-way Ticket to Hell (Eden) 110

Frisco Clay Gets C'Scope

SAN FRANCISCO—The Clay Theatre, local

art house where "House of Ricordi" now is

playing, is installing Cinemascope and widescreen

projection. The first film to be shown

will be "Gaby."

SAN FRANCISCO

Tack Marpole, property manager for the

Variety Club, presented membership cards

to George Christopher, mayor of Snn Pi'ancisco:

Clifford Ri.shell. mayor of Oakland,

and Wayne Thompson, Oakland city manager,

after they were sworn In as honorary

barkers by Nate Blumenfeld, chief barker.

The presentation was made at a special

luncheon held at the Fairmont Hotel last

week (2).

Glenn Coffey of Hayward has been appointed

by the Roy Cooper Theatres to

manage the Midway Drive-In at Reedley .

Hannah Oppie died recently following a long

illness. Mrs. Oppie had been associated for

many years with Westland Theatres and once

was executive secretary for the Northern

California branch of Independent Theatre

Deepest sympathy to Hulda Mc-

Owners . . .

Ginn, public relations woman for California

Theatres Ass'n, on the death of her husband

Walter.

Visitors to the Row included Edna Bell,

Altos, Los Altos; Bert Henson, city manager

in Klamath Falls for Redwood Theatres; Tiny

Turner, Coalinga Drive-In, Coalinga; Robert

Gingerich, Westerner Drive-In, Carmichael;

Bill Garren, Albany, Albany; Lou Spitzler,

Auto Movies, Pittsburg, and Dan Tocchini,

Analy, Sebastapol. The latter was contemplating

a trip to Europe.

.

.

The Porter in Woodland was closed, as was

the Rialto in Eureka. Both belong to the

Redwood Theatres chain Newton,

Fair Oaks, Fair Oaks, now operating the theatre

formerly operated by C. J. Remington,

was along the Row visiting with friends.

Newton formerly operated a theatre in Portland

visitor to the Row was

Victor Carlsen, who came from the north

with Newton and has taken over the Lux in

Sacramento with Mary Stevens.

Marvin Fox was named city manager of

the Pittsburg area for Blumenfeld circuit,

replacing Carol Bradley. Fox was an exhibitor

. in Washington Heroes"

will open at the St. Francis May 18. It Is

based on an incident of two men surviving a

war situation and will be promoted by the

personal appearance of one of the survivors,

Cpl. Bill Sparks of the British Royal Marines,

opening day . Leora Nelson is the

new secretary to Jack Stevenson, local Paramount

manager . . . Elizabeth Merritt, cashier,

after 42 years at Paramount, has retired.

Ward Pennington writes to his local pals

that he's very happy at his new post as manager

for Paramount, Milwaukee. Taking over

Ward's spot here as sales manager was

Milton Anderson, promoted from salesman

Lockerman, ledger clerk for

Paramount, was vacationing . . . Eric Smith,

"Tiny" Siita replaced Smith . Sherman

returned from her vacation and Al

Grubstick, WB's sales manager, left on his

vacation.

Jesse Wriglit, 'WB booker, now is called

"Slim Jim" after shedding a few pounds

working out with the Filmrow branch of

VTMCA. Next project in mind for Jesse is

giving up cigarets. Je.s.se claims he lost four

pounds, but everyone on the Row claims It's

English money . . . Francis Bateman, district

manager for Republic, was in town

with Mr. and Mrs. Whelpley. Whelpley

Is the head of the board of directors of Republic

. . . Stew Klein of Columbia had a

tooth pulled. Now, when he bites exhibitors,

they only have imprint of three teeth.

John Bowles has taken over the booking

and buying of the Valley Theatre in Anderson

for owner LewLs E. Blair . . . The Lucky

Drive-In at Turlock was sold to Affiliated as

of April 29. Bob Clark formerly handled the

theatre . . . Je.sse Levin, General Theatrical,

took over as agent for the booking and buying

of the Mountain View Drive-In, Mount

Shasta, owned by Mr. and Mrs. George English.

Charlie Gray left UA to join U-I . . . Jack

Voorhies, apprentice, succeeded Gray at UA

Spring, United ArtLsts, left to wed

... In town on her honeymoon last week was

Blanche Livingston, assistant to Harry Mandel,

national director of publicity and advertising

for RKO theatres , . . Kenneth Morris

was named manager of the State and Porter

in Woodland, replacing Rose Saso who had

been acting manager for the two George

Mann theatres. Morris served with other theatres

in the chain in Klamath Falls, Modesto

and Fortuna. He worked with the Mann theatres

in Woodland in 1949 and 1950. Mrs.

Saso is the regular manager of the State in

Modesto.

Disappearance of $1,498 in Coronet Theatre

receipts over the last ten weeks was reported

in the Examiner (2) as police and

insurance company agents started an investigation.

According to the Examiner,

Manager John A. Dobbs told police that a

check of ticket sales against receipts .showed

that the money began disappearing after

opening of "Oklahoma!" on February 10.

Showless After 30 Years

CATHLAMET, WASH.—Lack of business

has forced the Elco Theatre here to clase

Its doors and the town is without a theatre

for the first time in nearly 30 years. The

house is owned by Eugene Brock, who has

brought first run shows to town and had

installed the latest wldescreen equipment.

Attendance, however, had fallen off to a point

where It is now impossible to keep operating,

he said.

CKICtaO.ILL

IJ27 S. WlltSH

NEW VOIIK.

N.Y.

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