The-Tibetan-Book-of-Living-and-Dying

realjannaweiss

The-Tibetan-Book-of-Living-and-Dying

90 THE TIBETAN BOOK OF LIVING AND DYING

The expert and archaeologist of Petra who accompanied

Arthur Flowerdew could not explain this very ordinary

Englishman's uncanny knowledge of the city. He said:

He's filled in details and a lot of it is very consistent with known

archaeological and historical facts and it would require a mind very

different from his to be able to sustain a fabric of deception on the

scale of his memories—at least those which he's reported to me. I

don't think he's a fraud. I don't think he has the capacity to be a

fraud on this scale. 4

What else could explain Arthur Flowerdew's extraordinary

knowledge except rebirth? You could say that he might have

read books about Petra, or that he might have even received

his knowledge by telepathy yet the fact remains that some of

the information he was able to give was unknown even to the

experts.

Then there are fascinating cases of children who can spontaneously

remember details of a previous life. Many of these

cases have been collected by Dr. Ian Stevenson of the University

of Virginia. 5 One startling account of a child's memories of

a past life came to the attention of the Dalai Lama, who sent

a special representative to interview her and verify her

account. 6

Her name was Kamaljit Kour, and she was the daughter of a

schoolteacher in a Sikh family in the Punjab in India. One day,

on a visit to a fair in a local village with her father, she suddenly

asked him to take her to another village, some distance away.

Her father was surprised and asked her why. "I have nothing

here," she told him. "This is not my home. Please take me to

that village. One of my school-friends and I were riding on our

bicycles when suddenly we were hit by a bus. My friend was

killed instantly. I was injured in the head, ear, and nose. I was

taken from the site of the accident and laid on the bench in

front of a small courthouse nearby. Then I was taken to the village

hospital. My wounds were bleeding profusely and my parents

and relatives joined me there. Since there were no facilities

to cure me in the local hospital, they decided to take me to

Ambala. As the doctors said I could not be cured, I asked my

relatives to take me home." Her father was shocked, but when

she insisted, he finally agreed to take her to the village, though

he thought that it was just a child's whim.

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines