Hungarian and Eskimo-Aleut

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Hungarian and Eskimo-Aleut

ALFRÉD TÓTH : HUNGARIAN AND ESKIMO-ALEUT — with Paleo-Siberian Cognates

Hungarian tár “depot, warehouse”

Proto-Inuit *qaRiaq “storage alcove”

Sumerian tur (277x: ED IIIb, Ur III, Old Babylonian) wr. tur3; e2tur3 “animal

stall”

Rhaetic *torva “granary, warehouse” (Brunner and Tóth 1987, p. 98)

Hungarian tárni “to open up wide”

Proto-Finno-Ugric *tara(-) “free, open; to open”

Proto-Eskimo *q∂łpaR- “to open”

Sumerian dar (402x: ED IIIb, Old Akkadian, Lagash II, Ur III, Early Old

Babylonian, Old Babylonian, Middle Babylonian) wr. dar “to cut open”

Hungarian taraj “comb, crest; rowel”

Proto-Eskimo *il(l)aγiRun “comb”

Sumerian dirig (2166x: ED IIIb, Old Akkadian, Lagash II, Ur III, Early Old

Babylonian, Old Babylonian, Middle Babylonian) wr. diri; RI “(to be)

big, huge; on, over, above; to build high”

Hungarian tarhonya “granulated dried pastry made of flour and eggs, ‘eggbarley’”

Turkish tarhana “a kind of soup made of flour and milk”

Proto-Eskimo *∂vt∂R “juice”

Sumerian tar (237x: ED IIIb, Old Akkadian, Lagash II, Ur III, Old Babylonian)

wr. tar; tarar “to cut down; to untie, loosen; to cut; to scatter, disperse;

to decide” + kana (3x: Old Babylonian) wr. kana6; kana5; kana3 “(to

be) dark”. The Tarhonya dough is traditionally pressed through/cut by

a special sieve in order to get the “egg-barleys” (so the American name,

derived from Austrian German “Eiergerstel”: Germ. Gerste “barley”).

After the tarhonya are dry, they are roasted (“darkened”) in lard. Our

etymology thus shows that the pastry is primary and the soup

secondary. Therefore, the Hung. word cannot be borrowed (as usually

assumed; cf. EWU, p. 1484) from the Turkish word, but the Turkish

word is borrowed from the Hung., which explains that the two words

are phonetically almost identical. Both words, however, go back to

Sumerian.

Hungarian tarja “spare rib”

Proto-Finno-Ugric *turja

Proto-Eskimo *tulimaR “rib”

Sumerian dirig (2166x: ED IIIb, Old Akkadian, Lagash II, Ur III, Early Old

Babylonian, Old Babylonian, Middle Babylonian) wr. diri; RI “(to be)

big, huge; on, over, above; to build high”. Same etymology as taraj

(v.s.), but with already Sum. metathesis dirig > *dirgi > tarja. The spare

rib is taken from the neck part of the animal, thus from there where

the “crest” is (cf. German Kamm “crest; spare rib”).

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© Copyright Mikes International 2001-2007, Alfréd Tóth 2007 - 149 -

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