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Boxoffice-January.03.1953

. . . . . 9302 Daffy

. . . . . 9302 Daffy Doodles (7) . .lO-U-52 1952-53 SEASON 9301 A Feud There Was (7) 9-13-52 MISCELLANEOUS 8606 Orange Blossoms for Violet •rod. No. Title Rel. Date Rating Rev'd (10) 5-24-52 8-30 BLUE RIBBON HIT PARADE 8607 Daredevil Days (10) 8- 9-52 + 8-23 (Technicolor Reissues) 1952-53 SEASON 8308 Snow Time lor Comedy 9601 Ain't Rio Grand (9).. 9-13-52 + 11- J (7) 4-12-52 9602 1 Saw It Happen (10) . .10-18-52 1309 Hush My Mouse (7).. 5- 3-52 9603 Hunting the Devil Cat 1310 Baby Bottleneck (7)... 6-14-52 (10) 10-18-52 8311 The Bug Parade (7) 7-12-52 9604T0O Much Speed (..).. .1- 3-53 . (7).. 8- 2-52 9605 I Remember When ( . . . 2-14-53 8312 Merrie Old Soul SHORTS CHART 8722 Bird in a Guilty Cage (7) 8-30-52 NAME BAND MUSICALS + 10- 4 1952-53 SEASON 7306 Conriee Boswell and Ada Leonard 9701 Mousewarming (7) 9- 6-52 + 11- 1 (15) 5- 7-52 i 6-28 9702 The Egg-cited Rooster 7307 Buddy Mdrrow and His (7) 10- 4-52 12- 6 Orch. (15) 6-18-52 8- 2 9703 Tree (or Two (7) 10-18-52 + 12- 6 7308 Perez Prado and Orch 9704 The Super Snooper (7).. 11- 1-52 ± 12-20 (15) 7- 2-52 8-23 9705 Terrier-Stricken (7) 11-29-52 7309 Dick Jurgens and Orch 9706 Fool Coverage (7) 12-13-52 (15) 7-30-52 8-30 9707 Don't Give Up the Sheep 7310 Billy May and His Orch. (7) 1-13-53 (15) 8-20-52 9-20 9708 Snow Business (7) 1-17-53 7311 Jimmy Dorsey Varieties 9709 A Mouse Divided (7)... 1-31-53 (15) 9-25-52 10-18 9710 Kiss Me Cat (7) 2-21-53 TWO -REEL SPECIALS 9711 Duck Amuck (7) 2-28-53 .'202 Knights of the Highway SPORTS PARADE (17) 6-18-52 H 8- 2 (Technicolor) LANTZ CARTUNES 8506 Glamour in Tennis (10) 4- 5-52 .... (Technicolor Reissues) 8507 Switzerland Sportland 7328 Poet and Pensant (7)... 4-28-52 + 6-21 (10) 5-10-52 + 7-26 7329 Mousie Come Home (7). 5-26-52 -f 8- 2 8508 Centennial Sports (10) 7330 Fairvveather Fiends (7) 6-23-52 + 8-23 8509 Snow Frolics (10) 7-26-52 8-23 7-21-52 8510 Just lor Sport (10) 8-23-52 + 10- 4 SEASON 7331 Apple Andy 7332 Wacky Weed (7) (7) 8-18-52 1952-53 7333 Musical Moments (7). 915-52 9501 They Fly Through the Air VARIETY VIEWS (10) 10- 4-52 12. 7344 Rhythm on the Reef (9) 4-14-52 9502 Unfamiliar Sports (10).. 11- 1-52 + 12- 7345 Army's Finest (9) 6-16-52 4-19 9503 Fiesta lor Sports (9) . .12-20-52 7346 Future Generals (9) . . . 8- 4-52 8-30 9504 Sporting Courage (..).. .1-31-53 7347 Village Metropolis (9) . . 9- 8-52 9-13 TECHNICOLOR SPECIALS 7348 Man in the Peace Tower 8006 The Seeing Eye (20)... 4-26-52 tt 6-21 (9) 10-13-52 + 11-15 8007 No Pets Allowed (18).. 5-31-52 + 8- 2 WOODY WOODPECKER CARTUNES 8008 Open Up That Golden Gate (20) 7-19-52 (Technicolor) + 8-23 7353 Stage Hoax (7) 4-21-52 1952-53 SEASON + '••IS 7355 Woodpecker in the Rough 9001 Killers of the Swamp (7) 8-11-52 -f 6-28 (17) 9- 6-52 + U- 7354 Scalp Treatment (7) . . . 9- 8-52 + 9-20 9002 Man Without a Country (21) 10-25-52 ?356 The Great Who-Dood-lt (7) 10-26-52 -f 10-18 9003 Cruise of the Zaca (17). 12- 6-52 9004 Flag of Humanity (..).. 1-24-53 9505 Birthplace of Hockey ( . ) . 2-28-53 VITAPHONE NOVELTIES Wtarner Bros. 8605 Animals Have All the Fun (10) 4-19-52 + 6-21 8313 Fresh Airdale (7) 8-30-52 8720 Hoopy-Go-Lucky (7) 9303 A Day at the Zoo (7) .11- 8-52 9304 Early Worm Gets the Bird (7) .11-29-52 1-10-53 9305 Tale of Two Mice (7) 9306 Bashful Buzzard (7) . 2- 7-53 BUGS BUNNY SPECIALS (Technicolor) 8728 Water. Water Every Hare (7) 4-19-52 + 6-28 8729 The Hasty Hare (7) 6- 7-52 8-30 ± 8-23 8730 Oily Hare (7) 7-26-52 1952-53 SEASON 9723 Rabbit Seasoning (7) . . . 9723 Rabbit Seasoning (7)... .... + 12-13 9-20-52 9-20-52 9725 Hare Lift (7) 12-20-52 9726 Forward, March Hare (7) 2-14-53 FEATURETTES 7-26 8105 The Man Killers (20) . . 5-17-52 -f 8106 Trial by Trioger (20).. 7- 8-52 1952-53 SEASON 9101 Monsters of the Deep (20) 9-27-52 9102 Oklahoma Outlaws (20) .11-22-52 9103 Are Animals Actors? (..) 12-27-52 JOE McDOAKES COMEDIES 9401 So You're Going to the Convention (10) 6- 7-52 i: 8- 2 8406 So You Never Tell a Lie (10) 8- 2-52 1952-53 SEASON 9401 So You're Going to the Dentist (10) 9-20-52 ± 12- 6 9402 So You Want to Wear the Pants (10) 11- 8-52 + 12-20 9403 So You Want to Be a Musician . ( ) 1-10-53 . MELODY MASTER BANDS (Reissues) U.S. Navy Band (10) . . . 6-21-52 8805 8806 The Serenaders (10)... 8-16-52 1952-53 SEASON 9801 Freddie Fisher and Band (10) 10-11-52 9802 Junior Jive Bombers (10) U-15-S2 9803 Circus Band (9) 12-27-52 MERRIE MELODIES (Technicolor) 8713 Kidrtin' the Kitten (7). 4- 5-52 + 8714 Little Red Rodent Hood (7) 8715SockaOoodle-Do (7).. 8716 Beep Beep (7) 8716 Ain't She Tweet (7) . . 8718 The Turn-Tale Wolf (7) 8719 Cracked Quack (7) SHORTS REVIEWS i:

Opinions on Current Productions; Exploitips IFOR STORY SYNOPSIS ON EACH PICTURE, SEE REVERSI SIDE Rogue's March MGM (320) 83 Minutes F Rel. Feb. 13 Drama It has been a considerable stretch since the screen has offered a topnotch adventure drama dealing with the heroisms, the traditions, the pomp and ceremony of Queen Victoria's empire-building army. With a backward glance at the popularity of such films while they were much in vogue, and considering the productional excellence oi this one, it is impossible to predict for it anything but profitable bookings. Produced on the grand scale by Leon Gordon, who also wrote the yarn, the picture hasn't a dull moment, is spectacularly caparisoned and is masterfully organized as concerns technical details, atmospheric touches and period accuracies. While the cast boasts no flaming names, it delivers tellingly, with Allan Davis' careful direction restraining performances from becoming hammy, which easily might have happened in view of the subject matter. High adventure and tender romance are the things to sell. Peter Lawlord, Richard Greene, lanice Rule, Leo G. Carroll, John Abbott, Patrick Aheme, John Dodsworth. The Clown MGM (316) 89 Minutes F •53 Comedy Drama Rel. Jan. 16, '53 In view of Red Skelfon's dominant position as a motion picture, radio and television personality, the merchandising problem confronting exhibitors who book his toplining films is virtually nonexistent. The carrot-topped comic's marquee allure has long since been established, and exploitation efforts drafted for his newest starring vehicle can, accordingly, be tailored along standard lines. The story, representing something of a departure from the slapstick school with which Skelton has been most prominently identified in recent years, places a bit more emphasis on heart-tugs and pathos, a factor which probably will widen its audience appeal, but at the same time permits him to indulge his flair for knockabout comedy. It's top-of-lhe-bill fodder in general dual situations, given substantial productional backing by William H. Wright, and beneliting from the veteran directorial hand of Robert Z. Leonard. Red Skelton. Jane Greer. Timothy Considine, Loring Smith, Philip Ober. Lou Lubin. The Importance of Being Earnesf F (tecZicl) Univ.-Infl (381) 95 Minutes Rel. Dec. 22, '52 Oscar Wilde's witty comedy of the Victorian era has been given a superbly acted, brilliantly mounted production, one which is ideally suited to class audiences in the art houses, where the players are name draws. Realizing that the story is a static period piece studded with epigrams and exaggerated posturing. Director Anthony Asquith has wisely filmed the J. Arthur Rank production as a photographed stage play, even to the extent of having a society couple seated in a box raise their opera glasses as the curtain rises. At the end, the curtain falls and the full credits ore shown. The expert cast includes seme of England's best, including Edith Evans, as the haughty Lady Bracknell; Joan Greenwood, who has never looked lovelier or given a better performance; the inimitable Margaret Rutherford, as the skittish Miss Prism, and Michael Redgrave and Michael Denison, as elegant men-about-town. Technicolor enhances the period decor. Michael Redgrave, Joan Greenwood, Michael Denison, Edith Evans, Miles Malleson, Margaret Rutherford, Dorothy Tutin. (0 30) * tonal Texa.'i refit./ Moulin Rouge A Drama (Technicolor) United Artists (1195) 123 Minutes ReL The boundless talents of Oscar-winning Jose Ferrer—aided by a supporting cast oi comparable excellence—and the daring of Producer-Director John Huston combine to make the screen version of a widely known French novel a sheer delight for adults with any appreciation whatsoever of true artistry in picture-making. Further, and fortunately, the film's appeal will not be limited to those discriminating customers, .e'sea because Huston, with characteristic dexterity and flexibility, Louis endowed the opus with sufficient rowdyism and sex to assure strong attraction for rank-and-file ticket buyers. Favorable word-of-mouth reaction should, therefore, pyramid the subject into a top grosser. And where showmen take full advantage of its innumerable other assets—all of which are exploitation material—the booking should prove a bonanza. Not the least of these is Technicolor, which, because of a diffused technique, reaches a new high in effectiveness. Jose Ferrer, Zsa Zsa Gabor, Suzanne Flon, Colette Marchand, Katherine Eath, Claude Nollier, Georges Lonnes. The I Don't Care Girl p Musical ' (Teclinicolor) 20th-Fox (302) 78 Minutes Rel. Jan. '53 As every experienced film renter knows, 20th Century-Fox long since perfected an almost infallible formula for building popular and generally profitable filmusicals predicated upon the lives and loves of the former greats of show business. Herein it is applied with expected success to that tumultuous darling oi vaudeville and musical comedy, Eva Tanguay. Producer George Jessel—who, parenthetically, appears in and adds a sizable thespian asset to the picture—tried a few variations of the established recipe, which are welcome, albeit they have a mid-footage tendency to slow up the film's tempo. Nonetheless, all of the tried and true ingredients ore there to please spectators and furnish ammunition for shekel-garnering merchandising: Exciting and imaginative production numbers; glowing Technicolor photography; nostalgia-arousing, toe-tickling songs; an expertly selected, name-weighty cast; the inevitable boy-meels-girl romance; and, to blend them, the skilled direction of Lloyd Bacon. Mitzi Goynor, David Wayne, Oscar Levant, Bob Graham, Craig HilL Warren Stevens, Hazel Brooks. -y roughest Man in Arizona F Western With Music (Trucolor) Republic (5109) 90 Minutes Rel. Oct. 10, '52 A hard-hitting, blood-and-thunder western which has the advantage of Vaughn Monroe's name draw with his recording and radio fans to make it a good booking for general audiences. Exhibitors should stress Monroe, his singing of three songs, including "A Man's Best Friend Is His Horse" and "The Man Don't Live Who Can Die Alone," and the expert portrayals of Joan Leslie, as the "good girl," and Jean Parker, ag a jealous dance hall girl, to sell it in regular runs—the action fans will be attracted by the title and theme. While Monroe gives a rather stolid performance, he displays the strong, silent personality that swept Gary Cooper to fame and, of course, his singing is topnotch. Victor Jory is a standout as a vicious bandit who seems to ht the title more than does the mild-mannered Monroe. R. G. Springsteen directed, Sidney Picker is associate producer. Vaughn Monroe, Joan Leslie, Edgar Buchanan. Victor Jory, Jean Parker, Henry Morgan, Ian MacDonald, Bobby Hyatt. The Maverick F Western Allied Artists (5322) 70 Minutes HeL Dec. '52 Audiences which have come to expect a plentiful supply of fast-paced action, gunplay, hard riding, heroics and villainy as exemplified in the Wild Bill Elliott gallopers, produced for this company by Vincent M. Fennelly, will find all of those ingredients present and accounted for in adequate measure in this latest in the series. As usual, Wild Bill outwits and oulshoots the heavies, turning in his customary rugged portrayal, while the oater achieves some measure of lushness through the utilization of sepia tone photography to accentuate the beauties of the outdoor locations employed. Performances by the supporting players are satisfactory, and Thomas Carr directed the opus in standard sagebrush fashion. Exploitation can best be built around Elliott's allure as one of the screen's top western personalities, such merchandising campaign being directed primarily, of course, toward the juvenile customers patronizing weekend action bills. Wild Bill Elliott, Phyllis Coates, Florence Lake, Myron Healey, Bob Bray, Randy Brooks, Terry Frost. 1440 BOXOFFICE okersi or o\ Si January 3, 1953 Write— YOUR REPORT OF THE PICTURE YOU HAVE JUST PLAYED FOR THE GUIDANCE OF FELLOW EXHIBITORS. USE THE BLANK ON REVERSE SIDE — Right Now lust Paste It on a 2c GovermnenI Postcard and Mail. 1439