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POVERTY REDUCTION STRATEGY TN

c. Third Stage: Rural:

c. Third Stage: Rural: Villages; Urban: Zones/Wards/Slums Within the block, allocation of funds should be done villages or groups of villages again in proportion of total beneficiary population. Gram Panchayats should decide through Gram Sabha: i. Given their entitlement, what schemes (central and centrally sponsored) they would like to administer, and ii. Village level schemes should be administered by them. For schemes that have individual beneficiaries, the beneficiaries may be identified by the Gram Panchayat by looking at SC/ST/Antyodaya/ agricultural landless labourers/single parent households. First priority may be given to families at the intersection of any two criteria, i.e., households that satisfy at least two criteria. d. Fourth State: Households/Individuals There is a major need to improve household level targeting separately for urban and rural areas. The preferred method for such an exercise should be to use the NSS data to generate a set of indicators that provide more targeting power and which could be easily verifiable at reasonable cost. As far as possible, composite indices should not be used. Instead separate indicators for different aspects like health, education, income, and gender issues should be used for different programmes. It will be useful to supplement the listing in BPL Census by additional information. At the village level, the Gram Panchayat may offer the best information. In urban areas this may be more difficult. And NGOs may have a significant role in providing the needed information. For schemes that have individual beneficiaries, the beneficiaries may be identified by the Gram Panchayat by looking at SC/ST/Antyodaya/ agricultural landless labourers/single parent households. First priority may be given to families at the inter-section of any two criteria, i.e., households that satisfy at least two criteria. 6.4 Central and Centrally Sponsored Schemes a. Major Centrally Sponsored Schemes A number of central and centrally sponsored schemes, aimed at one or the other dimension of deprivation (income, health, education, and gender), have evolved over time. These schemes are characterized by many short comings relating to (1) multiplicity schemes for similar or comparable objectives, (2) faulty allocation among states, (3) bypassing state governments in administering these schemes, and (4) implementation 134

inefficiencies. Some of the major centrally sponsored schemes, particularly affecting the rural poor, are listed in Table 6.5. Table 6.5: Some Major Central and Centrally Sponsored Poverty Reduction Schemes Income Generating Schemes Asset Generating Other Schemes Schemes National Rural Employment Bharat Nirman Aam Admi Bima Yojana (AABY) Guarantee Scheme (NREGS) Swarna Jayanti Gram Swarozgar Pradhan Mantri Gram Rajeev Gandhi Gram Vidyutikaran Yojana (SJGSY) Sadak Yojana (PMGSY) Yojana (RGGVY) Sampoorna Grameen Swarozgar Indira Awas Yojana (IAY) Yojana (SGSY) National Old Age Pension Scheme (NOAPS) Some of the major schemes aimed at providing health and education services are listed in Table 6.6. Table 6.6: Schemes for Health, Education, and Safe Drinking Water Health Education Water Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan (SSA) National Programme of Mid-day Meals in Schools (Also impacts on education) Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana (RSBY) Universal Immunization Programme Pulse Polio Immunization Programme National Programme for Education of Girls at Elementary Education (NPEGEL) Kasturba Gandhi Balika Vidyalaya (KGBV) Scheme for Universalisation of Secondary Education Rajiv Gandhi National Drinking Water Mission (RGNDWM) National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme National Aids Control Programme Some of the major national schemes some Tamil Nadu schemes are briefly discussed below: a1. Midday Meal Scheme: Universal Coverage The National Programme of Mid-Day Meals in Schools covers approximately 9.70 crore children studying at the primary stage of education in 9.50 lakh schools. The programme was extended, with effect from 1.10.2007, to children in the upper primary stage of education (classes VI-VIII) in 3479 Educationally Backward Blocks (EBBs). The programme provides a mid-day meal of 450 calories and 12 grams of protein to children at the primary stage. For children at the upper primary stage, the nutritional value is 135

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